2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/602876
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
Caring for the Nurse in the Hospital Environment
Author(s):
Lott, Tanya F.; Clerico, Elizabeth T.; Clerico, Elizabeth T.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Gamma Omicron-at-Large
Author Details:
Tanya F. Lott, RN-BC, tanya.lott@rsfh.com; Elizabeth T. Clerico, RN, CGRN
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, November 7, 2015 and Sunday, November 8, 2015: Nurses at this Magnet hospital adopted Jean Watson’s Theory of Caring as their foundational theory of practice. The Nursing Research Council (NRC) wanted to investigate nurses’ perceptions of the hospital environment as caring and the degree to which nurses felt cared for within the hospital environment. The Caring Factor Scale© was modified from reflecting patients’ perceptions of being cared for by providers to measure nurses’ perception of feeling cared for within the hospital work environment.  The BSSF Caring Work Environment Survey© is administered electronically each year to all RNs in this healthcare system.  It consists of 12 questions that measure four domains:  physical needs, spiritual needs, intellectual stimulation and authentic relationships. Additional questions related to demographics and caring initiatives that the nurse has participated in vary slightly from year to year. Participation is voluntary and confidential. The overall mean caring score is calculated and item analysis is completed to provide comparison of the domains and comparison of responses among different demographics. Overall, the nurses feel cared for within the work environment.  Questions relating to spiritual needs and intellectual stimulation score highest; physical needs score lowest.  In 2012, the NRC questioned: Is there a difference in caring scores for nurses who take breaks as compared to those who do not? Two survey questions relating to breaks were added. Nurses who always or usually take breaks had significantly higher mean caring scores than those who take breaks less frequently or never (p<.01). Nurses who take an uninterrupted 30-minute break had significantly higher mean caring scores than those whose break gets interrupted (p<.01).  ANA Code of Ethics states that healthcare workers have a moral obligation to care for themselves so they can care for others effectively.  Taking breaks, and the benefits of breaks both for the nurse and for the patient, was promoted in 2013.  Analysis of the 2013 survey results demonstrated that nurses who take breaks have higher scores and perceive their environment as more caring; those who don’t take breaks have lower scores and perceive their work environment as less caring.   These results indicated that interventions during 2013 were effective and nurses associate taking breaks with a more caring environment.  The research team plans to: Continue to identify:  1 ) barriers to nurses taking breaks; and 2 ) strategies to allow nurses to take breaks. Promote the importance of nurse self-care and care of others on the healthcare team, including breaks, and the subsequent benefits that this will have on patient care and patient outcomes. Re-administer the BSSF Caring Work Environment Survey© at annual intervals to evaluate caring initiatives over time that affect the nurses’ perception of feeling cared for within the hospital environment. The nurses share a vision of caring and the survey allows them to be engaged in a scientific approach to strengthen caring among nurses with the ultimate goal of improving patient outcomes.
Keywords:
Magnet Showcase; Caring Work Environment
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15MG1.4
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleCaring for the Nurse in the Hospital Environmenten
dc.contributor.authorLott, Tanya F.en
dc.contributor.authorClerico, Elizabeth T.en
dc.contributor.authorClerico, Elizabeth T.en
dc.contributor.departmentGamma Omicron-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsTanya F. Lott, RN-BC, tanya.lott@rsfh.comen
dc.author.detailsElizabeth T. Clerico, RN, CGRNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/602876en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, November 7, 2015 and Sunday, November 8, 2015: Nurses at this Magnet hospital adopted Jean Watson’s Theory of Caring as their foundational theory of practice. The Nursing Research Council (NRC) wanted to investigate nurses’ perceptions of the hospital environment as caring and the degree to which nurses felt cared for within the hospital environment. The Caring Factor Scale© was modified from reflecting patients’ perceptions of being cared for by providers to measure nurses’ perception of feeling cared for within the hospital work environment.  The BSSF Caring Work Environment Survey© is administered electronically each year to all RNs in this healthcare system.  It consists of 12 questions that measure four domains:  physical needs, spiritual needs, intellectual stimulation and authentic relationships. Additional questions related to demographics and caring initiatives that the nurse has participated in vary slightly from year to year. Participation is voluntary and confidential. The overall mean caring score is calculated and item analysis is completed to provide comparison of the domains and comparison of responses among different demographics. Overall, the nurses feel cared for within the work environment.  Questions relating to spiritual needs and intellectual stimulation score highest; physical needs score lowest.  In 2012, the NRC questioned: Is there a difference in caring scores for nurses who take breaks as compared to those who do not? Two survey questions relating to breaks were added. Nurses who always or usually take breaks had significantly higher mean caring scores than those who take breaks less frequently or never (p<.01). Nurses who take an uninterrupted 30-minute break had significantly higher mean caring scores than those whose break gets interrupted (p<.01).  ANA Code of Ethics states that healthcare workers have a moral obligation to care for themselves so they can care for others effectively.  Taking breaks, and the benefits of breaks both for the nurse and for the patient, was promoted in 2013.  Analysis of the 2013 survey results demonstrated that nurses who take breaks have higher scores and perceive their environment as more caring; those who don’t take breaks have lower scores and perceive their work environment as less caring.   These results indicated that interventions during 2013 were effective and nurses associate taking breaks with a more caring environment.  The research team plans to: Continue to identify:  1 ) barriers to nurses taking breaks; and 2 ) strategies to allow nurses to take breaks. Promote the importance of nurse self-care and care of others on the healthcare team, including breaks, and the subsequent benefits that this will have on patient care and patient outcomes. Re-administer the BSSF Caring Work Environment Survey© at annual intervals to evaluate caring initiatives over time that affect the nurses’ perception of feeling cared for within the hospital environment. The nurses share a vision of caring and the survey allows them to be engaged in a scientific approach to strengthen caring among nurses with the ultimate goal of improving patient outcomes.en
dc.subjectMagnet Showcaseen
dc.subjectCaring Work Environmenten
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:38:36Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:38:36Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
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