Is Sitting Time Associated with Increased Health Risks in Nurses?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/602935
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Is Sitting Time Associated with Increased Health Risks in Nurses?
Other Titles:
Can Nurses Care for Themselves? [Session]
Author(s):
Sturgeon, Lizbeth P.; Garrett-Wright, Dawn; Main, Eve; Jones, Susan; Blackburn, Donna S.; Garrett-Wright, Dawn; Main, Eve; Jones, M. Susan; Blackburn, Donna S.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Kappa Theta
Author Details:
Lizbeth P. Sturgeon, RN, CNE, liz.sturgeon@wku.edu; Dawn Garrett-Wright, PhD, PMHNP, CNE; Eve Main, DNP; M. Susan Jones, PhD, MSN, RN, CNE, ANEF; Donna S. Blackburn, PhD, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Tuesday, November 10, 2015: Title:  Is Sitting Time Associated with Increased Health Risks in Nurses? Background: Sitting time (ST) has increased substantially in the last 50 years and is an emerging health risk. There is evidence that prolonged ST is a risk factor for all-cause mortality, independent of physical activity. Nurses are particularly at risk due to low baseline physical activity, older age, and the increasing use of computers in patient care, education, and research facilities.  There are no studies of nurses in the United States that examine their average daily ST in relation to health risk.  Objective: The purpose of this descriptive correlational study was to explore the ST of nurses in the United States in relation to general health. Method: A convenience sample (n = 86) was recruited from a 2014 Annual Research Conference held in the southwestern U.S. Participants completed demographic items, general health questions, and the Workforce Sitting Questionnaire (Chau, 2011), which asked ST while traveling, working , watching TV, using the computer at home, and doing other leisure activities on work and non-work days. Data were analyzed using descriptive and correlational statistics. Results: The average age of the participants was 47.4 years and 91% of the sample was female. The average BMI was 26.6 (SD ± 5.0) and 75.9 % of the participants described their general health as excellent or very good. The percentage of participants indicating that they were currently taking a medicine for blood pressure was 25.3 %, for high cholesterol was 17.7 %, and/or for diabetes was 3.8 %.  Total average ST was 10.5 hr (SD ± 3.7) on workdays and 10.3 hr (SD ± 4.9) on non-workdays. Across domains on workdays the average ST was 1.3 hr (transportation), 5.5 hr (at work), 1.3 hr (watching TV), 1.9 hr (home computer use), and 0.9 hr (other leisure activities). Total ST and ST domains for work days were not associated with self-reported BMI.  Sitting time domain for working on a non-work day did correlate with BMI (r = -.26). There was also an association in the average ST for non-work days with current usage of blood pressure medications (r = -.44). Discussion:  Evidence from earlier studies indicates that sitting for prolonged periods of time each day leads to negative health outcomes; this study demonstrated a relationship between working on a non-work day and BMI.  In addition, the usage of blood pressure medications was associated with average ST on a non-work day.  These findings support and add to our understanding of the effects of sitting time on increased health risks.
Keywords:
Sitting time; Cardiovascular risk; Sedentary behavior
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15H03
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleIs Sitting Time Associated with Increased Health Risks in Nurses?en
dc.title.alternativeCan Nurses Care for Themselves? [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorSturgeon, Lizbeth P.en
dc.contributor.authorGarrett-Wright, Dawnen
dc.contributor.authorMain, Eveen
dc.contributor.authorJones, Susanen
dc.contributor.authorBlackburn, Donna S.en
dc.contributor.authorGarrett-Wright, Dawnen
dc.contributor.authorMain, Eveen
dc.contributor.authorJones, M. Susanen
dc.contributor.authorBlackburn, Donna S.en
dc.contributor.departmentKappa Thetaen
dc.author.detailsLizbeth P. Sturgeon, RN, CNE, liz.sturgeon@wku.edu; Dawn Garrett-Wright, PhD, PMHNP, CNE; Eve Main, DNP; M. Susan Jones, PhD, MSN, RN, CNE, ANEF; Donna S. Blackburn, PhD, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/602935en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Tuesday, November 10, 2015: Title:  Is Sitting Time Associated with Increased Health Risks in Nurses? Background: Sitting time (ST) has increased substantially in the last 50 years and is an emerging health risk. There is evidence that prolonged ST is a risk factor for all-cause mortality, independent of physical activity. Nurses are particularly at risk due to low baseline physical activity, older age, and the increasing use of computers in patient care, education, and research facilities.  There are no studies of nurses in the United States that examine their average daily ST in relation to health risk.  Objective: The purpose of this descriptive correlational study was to explore the ST of nurses in the United States in relation to general health. Method: A convenience sample (n = 86) was recruited from a 2014 Annual Research Conference held in the southwestern U.S. Participants completed demographic items, general health questions, and the Workforce Sitting Questionnaire (Chau, 2011), which asked ST while traveling, working , watching TV, using the computer at home, and doing other leisure activities on work and non-work days. Data were analyzed using descriptive and correlational statistics. Results: The average age of the participants was 47.4 years and 91% of the sample was female. The average BMI was 26.6 (SD ± 5.0) and 75.9 % of the participants described their general health as excellent or very good. The percentage of participants indicating that they were currently taking a medicine for blood pressure was 25.3 %, for high cholesterol was 17.7 %, and/or for diabetes was 3.8 %.  Total average ST was 10.5 hr (SD ± 3.7) on workdays and 10.3 hr (SD ± 4.9) on non-workdays. Across domains on workdays the average ST was 1.3 hr (transportation), 5.5 hr (at work), 1.3 hr (watching TV), 1.9 hr (home computer use), and 0.9 hr (other leisure activities). Total ST and ST domains for work days were not associated with self-reported BMI.  Sitting time domain for working on a non-work day did correlate with BMI (r = -.26). There was also an association in the average ST for non-work days with current usage of blood pressure medications (r = -.44). Discussion:  Evidence from earlier studies indicates that sitting for prolonged periods of time each day leads to negative health outcomes; this study demonstrated a relationship between working on a non-work day and BMI.  In addition, the usage of blood pressure medications was associated with average ST on a non-work day.  These findings support and add to our understanding of the effects of sitting time on increased health risks.en
dc.subjectSitting timeen
dc.subjectCardiovascular risken
dc.subjectSedentary behavioren
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:39:49Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:39:49Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
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