Interprofessional Education to Enhance Health-Related Outcomes for LGBT Clients: How One Academic Medical Center is Leading the Way

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/602945
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Interprofessional Education to Enhance Health-Related Outcomes for LGBT Clients: How One Academic Medical Center is Leading the Way
Other Titles:
Leading Interprofessional Health Education [Session]
Author(s):
Friese, Tanya R.; Kent, Paul; Behel, Jay; Cvengros, Jamie; Ward, Edward; Hardacker, Cecilia; Logan, Antonio; Kent, Paul; Behel, Jay; Cvengros, Jamie; Ward, Edward; Hardacker, Cecilia; Logan, Antonio
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Gamma Phi
Author Details:
Tanya R. Friese, RN, CNL, tanya_r_friese@rush.edu; Paul Kent, MD; Jay Behel; Jamie Cvengros; Edward Ward; Cecilia Hardacker, RN; Antonio Logan
Abstract:
Session presented on Tuesday, November 10, 2015: Healthy People 2020 and the Institute of Medicine are among recent reports that underline the need for culturally competent healthcare for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals. In November of 2014, the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) released guidelines for training physicians to care for people who are LGBT, gender nonconforming, or born with differences of sex development. This is the first set of formal comprehensive standards to help medical schools and health care organizations train providers in the health care needs of these patients.  The American Nurses Association (ANA) concurs through their Diversity Awareness in Professional Nursing. In order to provide appropriate care, it is necessary to properly educate health professions students in the academic and clinical setting. Biases held by students must be addressed during their educational careers if these individuals are to become effective providers. Currently, in Canada and the United States medical and nursing students report only 5 hours of LGBT content in school. Gaps in LGBT related content create barriers and inhibit a beneficial patient-provider relationship. Rush University has been formally educating medical and nursing students to work with individuals who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) since 2011. Curriculum focuses on the historical context of identifying and livings as LGBT, healthcare barriers and disparities experienced by the LGBT population, sex and sexuality, legal concerns, association with youth experiencing homelessness and exploitation, risks of suicide and substance abuse, the transgender community, HIV /STIs, and strategies to promote engagement and retention in healthcare. Students also meet self-identified gay faculty members, students, and patients through panel presentations. In the College of Medicine, LGBT content is introduced in the first week of medical school during clinical skills intensive. It is also included in the social determinants of medicine, “Physicianship” modules during student’s M1 and M2 year. Prior to the M2 module, medical students complete the Implicit Association Test for sexuality, race, and a third test of their choosing. In the most recent cohort, over 98% of students attending the classes reported they were able to identify challenges in obtaining appropriate healthcare experienced by sexual minorities. In addition the medical school uses simulated patient extensively. In a random fashion, simulated patients will identify as LGBT to help the student become comfortable and to learn not to assume a patients LGBT status is necessarily connected to their clinical complaint. In the College of Nursing, LGBT content has been integrated into several courses including Mental Health Nursing, Community and Public Health Nursing and is being added to the Advanced Health Assessment course. Students meet LGBT faculty during the first week of nursing school as part of their introduction to diverse populations. During the third term, in Mental Health nursing, students attend a 6-hour Health Education about LGBT Elders (HEALE) cultural competency curriculum. To date, over 250 individuals, largely Generalist Entry-level Masters’ nursing students, have attended these sessions. Remarks are overwhelmingly positive with comments speaking to the great need for this type of education for example “I never knew how to address patients who were transgendered-now I know how to do that”.  In Community and Public Health, students are asked to formulate questions for an expert panel discussion and report they appreciate the candid responses panel members share. Students are tested about LGBT related content in each course. Moving forward, Rush University is working with the curricular recommendations of the AAMC  and ANA and to fully integrate LGBT content into our course with an emphasis on interprofessional education. Physicians and nurses, working together, with education based on a common set of knowledge, attitudes, and skills are most able to provide the highest standard of care in a safe, non-judgmental environment.
Keywords:
LGBT healthcare; Interprofessional Education; Curriculum integration
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15H11
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleInterprofessional Education to Enhance Health-Related Outcomes for LGBT Clients: How One Academic Medical Center is Leading the Wayen
dc.title.alternativeLeading Interprofessional Health Education [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorFriese, Tanya R.en
dc.contributor.authorKent, Paulen
dc.contributor.authorBehel, Jayen
dc.contributor.authorCvengros, Jamieen
dc.contributor.authorWard, Edwarden
dc.contributor.authorHardacker, Ceciliaen
dc.contributor.authorLogan, Antonioen
dc.contributor.authorKent, Paulen
dc.contributor.authorBehel, Jayen
dc.contributor.authorCvengros, Jamieen
dc.contributor.authorWard, Edwarden
dc.contributor.authorHardacker, Ceciliaen
dc.contributor.authorLogan, Antonioen
dc.contributor.departmentGamma Phien
dc.author.detailsTanya R. Friese, RN, CNL, tanya_r_friese@rush.edu; Paul Kent, MD; Jay Behel; Jamie Cvengros; Edward Ward; Cecilia Hardacker, RN; Antonio Loganen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/602945en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Tuesday, November 10, 2015: Healthy People 2020 and the Institute of Medicine are among recent reports that underline the need for culturally competent healthcare for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals. In November of 2014, the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) released guidelines for training physicians to care for people who are LGBT, gender nonconforming, or born with differences of sex development. This is the first set of formal comprehensive standards to help medical schools and health care organizations train providers in the health care needs of these patients.  The American Nurses Association (ANA) concurs through their Diversity Awareness in Professional Nursing. In order to provide appropriate care, it is necessary to properly educate health professions students in the academic and clinical setting. Biases held by students must be addressed during their educational careers if these individuals are to become effective providers. Currently, in Canada and the United States medical and nursing students report only 5 hours of LGBT content in school. Gaps in LGBT related content create barriers and inhibit a beneficial patient-provider relationship. Rush University has been formally educating medical and nursing students to work with individuals who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) since 2011. Curriculum focuses on the historical context of identifying and livings as LGBT, healthcare barriers and disparities experienced by the LGBT population, sex and sexuality, legal concerns, association with youth experiencing homelessness and exploitation, risks of suicide and substance abuse, the transgender community, HIV /STIs, and strategies to promote engagement and retention in healthcare. Students also meet self-identified gay faculty members, students, and patients through panel presentations. In the College of Medicine, LGBT content is introduced in the first week of medical school during clinical skills intensive. It is also included in the social determinants of medicine, “Physicianship” modules during student’s M1 and M2 year. Prior to the M2 module, medical students complete the Implicit Association Test for sexuality, race, and a third test of their choosing. In the most recent cohort, over 98% of students attending the classes reported they were able to identify challenges in obtaining appropriate healthcare experienced by sexual minorities. In addition the medical school uses simulated patient extensively. In a random fashion, simulated patients will identify as LGBT to help the student become comfortable and to learn not to assume a patients LGBT status is necessarily connected to their clinical complaint. In the College of Nursing, LGBT content has been integrated into several courses including Mental Health Nursing, Community and Public Health Nursing and is being added to the Advanced Health Assessment course. Students meet LGBT faculty during the first week of nursing school as part of their introduction to diverse populations. During the third term, in Mental Health nursing, students attend a 6-hour Health Education about LGBT Elders (HEALE) cultural competency curriculum. To date, over 250 individuals, largely Generalist Entry-level Masters’ nursing students, have attended these sessions. Remarks are overwhelmingly positive with comments speaking to the great need for this type of education for example “I never knew how to address patients who were transgendered-now I know how to do that”.  In Community and Public Health, students are asked to formulate questions for an expert panel discussion and report they appreciate the candid responses panel members share. Students are tested about LGBT related content in each course. Moving forward, Rush University is working with the curricular recommendations of the AAMC  and ANA and to fully integrate LGBT content into our course with an emphasis on interprofessional education. Physicians and nurses, working together, with education based on a common set of knowledge, attitudes, and skills are most able to provide the highest standard of care in a safe, non-judgmental environment.en
dc.subjectLGBT healthcareen
dc.subjectInterprofessional Educationen
dc.subjectCurriculum integrationen
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:40:01Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:40:01Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
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