Beyond Survival: An Interpretive Phenomenological Investigation Into Being the Father of a Very Low Birth Weight Infant

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/602972
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Beyond Survival: An Interpretive Phenomenological Investigation Into Being the Father of a Very Low Birth Weight Infant
Other Titles:
The Psychological Impact of Disease and Illness of Families [Session]
Author(s):
Johnston, Donald
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Chi
Author Details:
Donald Johnston, RN, RRT, johnstond@nsula.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, November 9, 2015: Abstract This phenomenological study, based on the writings of Martin Heidegger, describes what it was like for eleven fathers of very low birth weight infants during their infants’ stay in a neonatal intensive care unit.  Each participant was interviewed up to three times.  Interviews were semi-structured, digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim.  Data were analyzed using Max van Manen’s methodology, along with a metaphorical illustration to illuminate meanings of experiences.  Analysis was structured using Heidegger’s philosophical concepts of Being-in-the-world and Being-with-others, as well as the added concept of Being a changed man.  The themes that emerged were: shock; exploring hostile terrain; fearing the unnatural; feeling powerless; unpredictability; surviving; baggage; feeling left out; feeling misunderstood; needing/accepting support; holding back from Mom; and doubting/accepting paternity.  The findings revealed that fathers struggle with powerlessness as they attempt to acclimate to the foreign environment of NICU and respond best when given tasks to perform.  They tend to choose their battles based on the wisest expenditure of energy, and may leave an environment where they perceive they are not needed.  Fathers benefit from developing close relationships with NICU nurses, but often feel misunderstood and require that trust be earned.  Keywords: phenomenology, qualitative, fathers, dads, neonatal intensive care, premature, VLBW infant
Keywords:
qualitative research; fathers; neonatal intensive care
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15D24
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleBeyond Survival: An Interpretive Phenomenological Investigation Into Being the Father of a Very Low Birth Weight Infanten
dc.title.alternativeThe Psychological Impact of Disease and Illness of Families [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, Donalden
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Chien
dc.author.detailsDonald Johnston, RN, RRT, johnstond@nsula.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/602972en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, November 9, 2015: Abstract This phenomenological study, based on the writings of Martin Heidegger, describes what it was like for eleven fathers of very low birth weight infants during their infants’ stay in a neonatal intensive care unit.  Each participant was interviewed up to three times.  Interviews were semi-structured, digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim.  Data were analyzed using Max van Manen’s methodology, along with a metaphorical illustration to illuminate meanings of experiences.  Analysis was structured using Heidegger’s philosophical concepts of Being-in-the-world and Being-with-others, as well as the added concept of Being a changed man.  The themes that emerged were: shock; exploring hostile terrain; fearing the unnatural; feeling powerless; unpredictability; surviving; baggage; feeling left out; feeling misunderstood; needing/accepting support; holding back from Mom; and doubting/accepting paternity.  The findings revealed that fathers struggle with powerlessness as they attempt to acclimate to the foreign environment of NICU and respond best when given tasks to perform.  They tend to choose their battles based on the wisest expenditure of energy, and may leave an environment where they perceive they are not needed.  Fathers benefit from developing close relationships with NICU nurses, but often feel misunderstood and require that trust be earned.  Keywords: phenomenology, qualitative, fathers, dads, neonatal intensive care, premature, VLBW infanten
dc.subjectqualitative researchen
dc.subjectfathersen
dc.subjectneonatal intensive careen
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:40:35Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:40:35Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
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