Cardiovascular Risk Factors among College Students: Knowledge, Perception and Risk Assessment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/603036
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cardiovascular Risk Factors among College Students: Knowledge, Perception and Risk Assessment
Other Titles:
Cardiovascular Issues: Engaging Risk and Care [Session]
Author(s):
Tran, Dieu-My T.; Zimmerman, Lani M.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Pi Gamma
Author Details:
Dieu-My T. Tran, RN, dttran@unmc.edu; Lani M. Zimmerman, PhD, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, November 7, 2015: Background: Young adults in the United States�are not realistic about their health and eating habits; one-third do not understand the association between their current health behaviors and the impact on their future cardiovascular disease�risk. Purpose: To assess a college population of young adults' knowledge and perception of cardiovascular risk factors�and to screen for their cardiovascular risks and cluster subgroups with similar characteristics. Conceptual Framework: The conceptual models guiding this study were the Health Belief Model and the Information, Motivation and Behavioral Skills Model. Method: A descriptive research study was conducted in 158 college students, who attended a Midwestern university. The average age of the participants were 24.33 years old (ages 19-39). Participants' socio-demographics, knowledge (Heart Disease Fact Questionnaire) and perception (Health Beliefs Related to Cardiovascular Disease) of cardiovascular risk factors, and biomarkers (random blood glucose, blood pressure, lipid panels, height and weight) were assessed. The Pooled Cohort risk equations and 30-year�cardiovascular disease�assessments were generated for cardiovascular risk estimates. Hierarchical clustering analysis was used to identify subgroups of high risk individuals. Results: College students were knowledgeable ( M =13.9, SD =2.30) about cardiovascular risk factors, but did not perceived themselves at risk for cardiovascular disease. There were no significant relationships found between knowledge and perception of cardiovascular risk factors. Knowledge of cardiovascular risk factors was correlated with the lifetime risk estimates rho =.17, p =.048, and perception of cardiovascular risk factors were positively associated with the 30-year�cardiovascular disease�estimates rho =.16, p =.048. The average lifetime risk assessment (31.4%) was higher compared to the average 30-year�cardiovascular disease�assessment (4.8%). The cluster technique identified white, single males with a family history of heart disease, overweight/obese, hypertensive, and occasionally (weekly) consumed red meats were considered the higher risk group to target for cardiovascular risk reduction intervention compared to other subgroups. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that high knowledge level of cardiovascular risk factors is not sufficient to maintain an optimal cardiovascular risk estimates, but changing perception of�cardiovascular risk factors may play a bigger role in long-term cardiovascular risks. It also identified a high risk subgroup of a population that should be targeted for cardiovascular risk reduction.
Keywords:
risk assessment; college students; cardiovascular risk factors
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15A01
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleCardiovascular Risk Factors among College Students: Knowledge, Perception and Risk Assessmenten
dc.title.alternativeCardiovascular Issues: Engaging Risk and Care [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorTran, Dieu-My T.en
dc.contributor.authorZimmerman, Lani M.en
dc.contributor.departmentPi Gammaen
dc.author.detailsDieu-My T. Tran, RN, dttran@unmc.edu; Lani M. Zimmerman, PhD, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/603036en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, November 7, 2015: Background: Young adults in the United States�are not realistic about their health and eating habits; one-third do not understand the association between their current health behaviors and the impact on their future cardiovascular disease�risk. Purpose: To assess a college population of young adults' knowledge and perception of cardiovascular risk factors�and to screen for their cardiovascular risks and cluster subgroups with similar characteristics. Conceptual Framework: The conceptual models guiding this study were the Health Belief Model and the Information, Motivation and Behavioral Skills Model. Method: A descriptive research study was conducted in 158 college students, who attended a Midwestern university. The average age of the participants were 24.33 years old (ages 19-39). Participants' socio-demographics, knowledge (Heart Disease Fact Questionnaire) and perception (Health Beliefs Related to Cardiovascular Disease) of cardiovascular risk factors, and biomarkers (random blood glucose, blood pressure, lipid panels, height and weight) were assessed. The Pooled Cohort risk equations and 30-year�cardiovascular disease�assessments were generated for cardiovascular risk estimates. Hierarchical clustering analysis was used to identify subgroups of high risk individuals. Results: College students were knowledgeable ( M =13.9, SD =2.30) about cardiovascular risk factors, but did not perceived themselves at risk for cardiovascular disease. There were no significant relationships found between knowledge and perception of cardiovascular risk factors. Knowledge of cardiovascular risk factors was correlated with the lifetime risk estimates rho =.17, p =.048, and perception of cardiovascular risk factors were positively associated with the 30-year�cardiovascular disease�estimates rho =.16, p =.048. The average lifetime risk assessment (31.4%) was higher compared to the average 30-year�cardiovascular disease�assessment (4.8%). The cluster technique identified white, single males with a family history of heart disease, overweight/obese, hypertensive, and occasionally (weekly) consumed red meats were considered the higher risk group to target for cardiovascular risk reduction intervention compared to other subgroups. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that high knowledge level of cardiovascular risk factors is not sufficient to maintain an optimal cardiovascular risk estimates, but changing perception of�cardiovascular risk factors may play a bigger role in long-term cardiovascular risks. It also identified a high risk subgroup of a population that should be targeted for cardiovascular risk reduction.en
dc.subjectrisk assessmenten
dc.subjectcollege studentsen
dc.subjectcardiovascular risk factorsen
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:41:58Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:41:58Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
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