Cardiovascular Risk Factors among College Students: Knowledge, Perception and Risk Assessment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/603036
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cardiovascular Risk Factors among College Students: Knowledge, Perception and Risk Assessment
Other Titles:
Cardiovascular Issues: Engaging Risk and Care [Session]
Author(s):
Tran, Dieu-My T.; Zimmerman, Lani M.; Zimmerman, Lani M.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Pi Gamma
Author Details:
Dieu-My T. Tran, RN, dttran@unmc.edu; Lani M. Zimmerman, PhD, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, November 7, 2015: Background: Young adults in the United States are not realistic about their health and eating habits; one-third do not understand the association between their current health behaviors and the impact on their future cardiovascular disease risk. Purpose: To assess a college population of young adults’ knowledge and perception of cardiovascular risk factors and to screen for their cardiovascular risks and cluster subgroups with similar characteristics. Conceptual Framework: The conceptual models guiding this study were the Health Belief Model and the Information, Motivation and Behavioral Skills Model. Method: A descriptive research study was conducted in 158 college students, who attended a Midwestern university. The average age of the participants were 24.33 years old (ages 19-39). Participants’ socio-demographics, knowledge (Heart Disease Fact Questionnaire) and perception (Health Beliefs Related to Cardiovascular Disease) of cardiovascular risk factors , and biomarkers (random blood glucose, blood pressure, lipid panels, height and weight) were assessed. The Pooled Cohort risk equations and 30-year cardiovascular disease assessments were generated for cardiovascular risk estimates. Hierarchical clustering analysis was used to identify subgroups of high risk individuals. Results: College students were knowledgeable ( M =13.9, SD =2.30) about cardiovascular risk factors , but did not perceived themselves at risk for cardiovascular disease. There were no significant relationships found between knowledge and perception of cardiovascular risk factors . Knowledge of cardiovascular risk factors  was correlated with the lifetime risk estimates rho =.17, p =.048, and perception of cardiovascular risk factors were positively associated with the 30-year cardiovascular disease estimates rho =.16, p =.048. The average lifetime risk assessment (31.4%) was higher compared to the average 30-year cardiovascular disease assessment (4.8%). The cluster technique identified white, single males with a family history of heart disease, overweight/obese, hypertensive, and occasionally (weekly) consumed red meats were considered the higher risk group to target for cardiovascular risk reduction intervention compared to other subgroups. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that high knowledge level of  cardiovascular risk factors  is not sufficient to maintain an optimal cardiovascular risk estimates, but changing perception of cardiovascular risk factors  may play a bigger role in long-term cardiovascular risks. It also identified a high risk subgroup of a population that should be targeted for cardiovascular risk reduction.
Keywords:
risk assessment; college students; cardiovascular risk factors
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15A01
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleCardiovascular Risk Factors among College Students: Knowledge, Perception and Risk Assessmenten
dc.title.alternativeCardiovascular Issues: Engaging Risk and Care [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorTran, Dieu-My T.en
dc.contributor.authorZimmerman, Lani M.en
dc.contributor.authorZimmerman, Lani M.en
dc.contributor.departmentPi Gammaen
dc.author.detailsDieu-My T. Tran, RN, dttran@unmc.edu; Lani M. Zimmerman, PhD, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/603036en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, November 7, 2015: Background: Young adults in the United States are not realistic about their health and eating habits; one-third do not understand the association between their current health behaviors and the impact on their future cardiovascular disease risk. Purpose: To assess a college population of young adults’ knowledge and perception of cardiovascular risk factors and to screen for their cardiovascular risks and cluster subgroups with similar characteristics. Conceptual Framework: The conceptual models guiding this study were the Health Belief Model and the Information, Motivation and Behavioral Skills Model. Method: A descriptive research study was conducted in 158 college students, who attended a Midwestern university. The average age of the participants were 24.33 years old (ages 19-39). Participants’ socio-demographics, knowledge (Heart Disease Fact Questionnaire) and perception (Health Beliefs Related to Cardiovascular Disease) of cardiovascular risk factors , and biomarkers (random blood glucose, blood pressure, lipid panels, height and weight) were assessed. The Pooled Cohort risk equations and 30-year cardiovascular disease assessments were generated for cardiovascular risk estimates. Hierarchical clustering analysis was used to identify subgroups of high risk individuals. Results: College students were knowledgeable ( M =13.9, SD =2.30) about cardiovascular risk factors , but did not perceived themselves at risk for cardiovascular disease. There were no significant relationships found between knowledge and perception of cardiovascular risk factors . Knowledge of cardiovascular risk factors  was correlated with the lifetime risk estimates rho =.17, p =.048, and perception of cardiovascular risk factors were positively associated with the 30-year cardiovascular disease estimates rho =.16, p =.048. The average lifetime risk assessment (31.4%) was higher compared to the average 30-year cardiovascular disease assessment (4.8%). The cluster technique identified white, single males with a family history of heart disease, overweight/obese, hypertensive, and occasionally (weekly) consumed red meats were considered the higher risk group to target for cardiovascular risk reduction intervention compared to other subgroups. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that high knowledge level of  cardiovascular risk factors  is not sufficient to maintain an optimal cardiovascular risk estimates, but changing perception of cardiovascular risk factors  may play a bigger role in long-term cardiovascular risks. It also identified a high risk subgroup of a population that should be targeted for cardiovascular risk reduction.en
dc.subjectrisk assessmenten
dc.subjectcollege studentsen
dc.subjectcardiovascular risk factorsen
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:41:58Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:41:58Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
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