Health as Expanding Consciousness: Patterns of Clinical Reasoning in Senior Baccalaureate Nursing Students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/603055
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health as Expanding Consciousness: Patterns of Clinical Reasoning in Senior Baccalaureate Nursing Students
Other Titles:
Undergraduate Nursing Education Research [Session]
Author(s):
Stec, Mary W.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Iota Kappa
Author Details:
Mary W. Stec, RN, CNE, BobMary1@verizon.net
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, November 7, 2015: Clinical reasoning has been identified as a necessary skill to practice nursing.  Multiple studies suggest that a gap exists between the education of nurses and their ability to transition into practice.  In addition to possessing necessary knowledge and skills specific to the discipline of nursing, nurses must possess clinical reasoning skills to think through a situation as the patient’s condition changes.  To make a clinical judgment, nurses use an analytical process that includes pattern recognition, an attribute of clinical reasoning.  Newman’s theory of Health as Expanding Consciousness and Research as Praxis methodology was used to collect and analyze data.  Patterns of individual and across participants revealed the emergence of patterns of relating, knowing, and clinical decision-making as contributing to the evolving pattern of clinical reasoning.   The findings of this study were consistent with Newman’s theory and support the theoretical framework and methodology.  An implication for nursing science was that the nurse-patient interaction broadened the use of this theory to how study participants think in the clinical area.  In nursing education and practice the importance of the nurse-patient interaction and pattern recognition facilitated knowing the patient to make effective decisions.  Trusting relationships with faculty and members of the interdisciplinary team, confirmed participants’ thinking related to a clinical decision.  Future research included a longitudinal qualitative study of the emergence of clinical reasoning over time as participants evolve from novice to experience nurses.  A quantitative study to measure patterns of relating, knowing and decision-making will further clarify the definition of clinical reasoning.
Keywords:
clinical reasoning; Pattern Recognition; Health as Expanding Consciousness
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15A19
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleHealth as Expanding Consciousness: Patterns of Clinical Reasoning in Senior Baccalaureate Nursing Studentsen
dc.title.alternativeUndergraduate Nursing Education Research [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorStec, Mary W.en
dc.contributor.departmentIota Kappaen
dc.author.detailsMary W. Stec, RN, CNE, BobMary1@verizon.neten
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/603055en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, November 7, 2015: Clinical reasoning has been identified as a necessary skill to practice nursing.  Multiple studies suggest that a gap exists between the education of nurses and their ability to transition into practice.  In addition to possessing necessary knowledge and skills specific to the discipline of nursing, nurses must possess clinical reasoning skills to think through a situation as the patient’s condition changes.  To make a clinical judgment, nurses use an analytical process that includes pattern recognition, an attribute of clinical reasoning.  Newman’s theory of Health as Expanding Consciousness and Research as Praxis methodology was used to collect and analyze data.  Patterns of individual and across participants revealed the emergence of patterns of relating, knowing, and clinical decision-making as contributing to the evolving pattern of clinical reasoning.   The findings of this study were consistent with Newman’s theory and support the theoretical framework and methodology.  An implication for nursing science was that the nurse-patient interaction broadened the use of this theory to how study participants think in the clinical area.  In nursing education and practice the importance of the nurse-patient interaction and pattern recognition facilitated knowing the patient to make effective decisions.  Trusting relationships with faculty and members of the interdisciplinary team, confirmed participants’ thinking related to a clinical decision.  Future research included a longitudinal qualitative study of the emergence of clinical reasoning over time as participants evolve from novice to experience nurses.  A quantitative study to measure patterns of relating, knowing and decision-making will further clarify the definition of clinical reasoning.en
dc.subjectclinical reasoningen
dc.subjectPattern Recognitionen
dc.subjectHealth as Expanding Consciousnessen
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:42:21Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:42:21Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
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