African-American Non-Nursing Science Majors' Perceptions of Nursing in the Context of Career Ideals

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/603078
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
African-American Non-Nursing Science Majors' Perceptions of Nursing in the Context of Career Ideals
Other Titles:
Nursing as a Career: Student Perspectives [Session]
Author(s):
Alexander, Robbi K.; Diefenbeck, Cynthia A.; Diefenbeck, Cynthia A.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Xi
Author Details:
Robbi K. Alexander, RN, PMHCNS-BC, rkalexan@udel.edu; Cynthia A. Diefenbeck, RN, PMHCNS-BC
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, November 9, 2015: The racial/ethnic distribution of the Registered Nurse (RN) workforce (African Americans 5.4%) differs substantially from the United States population (African Americans 13.1%).  It has been suggested that a career in nursing is not the path to upward social and professional mobility that it once was for African American women.  Researchers suggest that views students hold about nursing as a career option contribute to the lack of RN workforce diversity.  Much of the nursing education literature that addresses nursing students from underrepresented minority groups focuses on the recruitment, support and retention of disadvantaged and academically underprepared students.  This qualitative descriptive study was designed to explore the career behaviors of African American undergraduate non-nursing science majors and describe their perceptions about the nursing profession and the desirability of a nursing career for themselves.  The results of this study indicate that for this group of STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) oriented African American non-nursing science majors, the most desirable careers are those that afford one the power to, (a) live and work with a high degree of choice an autonomy, (b) help others and personally affect change, (c) be a positive role model of African American culture and (d) disprove negative stereotypes about African Americans.  Strategies to recruit students from this underrepresented racial/ethnic group to nursing should include those which improve the visibility of the profession, highlight APN and leadership roles, and demonstrate the profession's power to affect change. 
Keywords:
Nursing Workforce; Diversity; African American
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15D16
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleAfrican-American Non-Nursing Science Majors' Perceptions of Nursing in the Context of Career Idealsen
dc.title.alternativeNursing as a Career: Student Perspectives [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorAlexander, Robbi K.en
dc.contributor.authorDiefenbeck, Cynthia A.en
dc.contributor.authorDiefenbeck, Cynthia A.en
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Xien
dc.author.detailsRobbi K. Alexander, RN, PMHCNS-BC, rkalexan@udel.edu; Cynthia A. Diefenbeck, RN, PMHCNS-BCen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/603078en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, November 9, 2015: The racial/ethnic distribution of the Registered Nurse (RN) workforce (African Americans 5.4%) differs substantially from the United States population (African Americans 13.1%).  It has been suggested that a career in nursing is not the path to upward social and professional mobility that it once was for African American women.  Researchers suggest that views students hold about nursing as a career option contribute to the lack of RN workforce diversity.  Much of the nursing education literature that addresses nursing students from underrepresented minority groups focuses on the recruitment, support and retention of disadvantaged and academically underprepared students.  This qualitative descriptive study was designed to explore the career behaviors of African American undergraduate non-nursing science majors and describe their perceptions about the nursing profession and the desirability of a nursing career for themselves.  The results of this study indicate that for this group of STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) oriented African American non-nursing science majors, the most desirable careers are those that afford one the power to, (a) live and work with a high degree of choice an autonomy, (b) help others and personally affect change, (c) be a positive role model of African American culture and (d) disprove negative stereotypes about African Americans.  Strategies to recruit students from this underrepresented racial/ethnic group to nursing should include those which improve the visibility of the profession, highlight APN and leadership roles, and demonstrate the profession's power to affect change. en
dc.subjectNursing Workforceen
dc.subjectDiversityen
dc.subjectAfrican Americanen
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:42:50Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:42:50Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.