Effective Use of Employee Vaccination Data to Improve Healthcare Workers' Seasonal influenza Vaccination Rates

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/603083
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effective Use of Employee Vaccination Data to Improve Healthcare Workers' Seasonal influenza Vaccination Rates
Other Titles:
Can Nurses Care for Themselves? [Session]
Author(s):
Dogani, Fatsani L.; Mendelsohn, Aaron; Lockett, Cassius; Mendelsohn, Aaron; Lockett, Cassius
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Fatsani L. Dogani, RN, fatsanidogani@gmail.com; Aaron Mendelsohn; Cassius Lockett
Abstract:
Session presented on Tuesday, November 10, 2015: Influenza is a global health problem annually resulting in excess mortality and morbidity.  Vaccination is a well-established preventative measure for influenza and is especially encouraged in healthcare workers to prevent passing disease to patients. The objective of this study was to use employee vaccination data to assess factors associated with vaccination uptake (the percentage immunized) among workers at a large, healthcare institution in California during the 2006/2007 through 2011/2012 seasons. A combined cohort/cross sectional study design was utilized. Basic descriptive analyses were used to describe vaccination rates and reasons for vaccination declination by important subgroups.  A logistic regression model was fit to examine factors (i.e., age, gender, job category, and work department) associated with vaccination uptake. The vaccination rates increased from 48% in 2006/2007 to 74.9% in 2011/2012. During the 2009 influenza pandemic, 72% of employees were vaccinated with the seasonal flu vaccine versus 68% who were vaccinated with the 2009 H1N1 vaccine. The most common reason for declination across all job categories was “personal reasons” (58%), followed by “I get ill from the flu vaccine” (16%). Data from the 2011/2012 season showed that vaccination rates varied by age (OR=1.005) and employee type (nursing assistants versus nurses, OR =1.408), and location (working in a procedure area compared with working in medical surgical units, OR= .840). Although statistical differences were found, there were no real clinical differences seen as evidenced by small differences in percentage vaccination rates. The identification of factors related to vaccination uptake is an important step in developing targeted strategies to increase compliance with vaccination recommendations.
Keywords:
Healthcare workers; Influenza; Seasonal Vaccination
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15H03
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleEffective Use of Employee Vaccination Data to Improve Healthcare Workers' Seasonal influenza Vaccination Ratesen
dc.title.alternativeCan Nurses Care for Themselves? [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorDogani, Fatsani L.en
dc.contributor.authorMendelsohn, Aaronen
dc.contributor.authorLockett, Cassiusen
dc.contributor.authorMendelsohn, Aaronen
dc.contributor.authorLockett, Cassiusen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsFatsani L. Dogani, RN, fatsanidogani@gmail.com; Aaron Mendelsohn; Cassius Locketten
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/603083en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Tuesday, November 10, 2015: Influenza is a global health problem annually resulting in excess mortality and morbidity.  Vaccination is a well-established preventative measure for influenza and is especially encouraged in healthcare workers to prevent passing disease to patients. The objective of this study was to use employee vaccination data to assess factors associated with vaccination uptake (the percentage immunized) among workers at a large, healthcare institution in California during the 2006/2007 through 2011/2012 seasons. A combined cohort/cross sectional study design was utilized. Basic descriptive analyses were used to describe vaccination rates and reasons for vaccination declination by important subgroups.  A logistic regression model was fit to examine factors (i.e., age, gender, job category, and work department) associated with vaccination uptake. The vaccination rates increased from 48% in 2006/2007 to 74.9% in 2011/2012. During the 2009 influenza pandemic, 72% of employees were vaccinated with the seasonal flu vaccine versus 68% who were vaccinated with the 2009 H1N1 vaccine. The most common reason for declination across all job categories was “personal reasons” (58%), followed by “I get ill from the flu vaccine” (16%). Data from the 2011/2012 season showed that vaccination rates varied by age (OR=1.005) and employee type (nursing assistants versus nurses, OR =1.408), and location (working in a procedure area compared with working in medical surgical units, OR= .840). Although statistical differences were found, there were no real clinical differences seen as evidenced by small differences in percentage vaccination rates. The identification of factors related to vaccination uptake is an important step in developing targeted strategies to increase compliance with vaccination recommendations.en
dc.subjectHealthcare workersen
dc.subjectInfluenzaen
dc.subjectSeasonal Vaccinationen
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:42:57Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:42:57Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
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