Impact of Multicontextual Teaching/Learning on Minority BSN Student Engagement: A Qualitative Research Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/603088
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of Multicontextual Teaching/Learning on Minority BSN Student Engagement: A Qualitative Research Study
Other Titles:
Education Strategies in Undergraduate Nursing [Session]
Author(s):
Dolan, Scott C.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Rho Omicron
Author Details:
Scott C. Dolan, RN, sdolan@mccn.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Tuesday, November 10, 2015: Lack of diversity among nursing and student nursing populations is not a new issue.  As early as 2004, the Sullivan Report called on the healthcare professions to increase the number of minorities within the ranks.  Many healthcare professions, including nursing, answered this call by focusing efforts on increased minority student recruitment.  However, despite the increased focus on recruitment, numbers of ethnically diverse healthcare professionals still remain low.  Statistics provided by the Budden, Zhong, Moulton, and Cimiotti (2013) indicated that only 19 percent of registered nurses were of a racial or ethnic background.  In light of the continued lack of diversity within the ranks of the registered nursing population, the National League for Nursing (2009) cited the measurement of academic outcomes of diverse nursing student populations as a priority research area.  Despite attempts to increase enrollment of minority nursing students, retention while in the traditional pre-licensure nursing programs remains a problem.  Increased rates of minority student attrition have been attributed to several factors.  Multiple research studies that cite lack of academic preparation as a key factor contributing to increased rates of attrition among minority (Martinez, Sher, Krull, & Wood, 2009; The Sullivan Commission, 2004).  Additionally, researchers from Brown and Marshall (2008) noted poor test taking skills caused increased levels of attrition among minority baccalaureate nursing students.  Lofton, Newman, Dumas, Gilden, and Bond (2012) reported that a lack of consistent documentation regarding attrition rates and that some have estimated attrition rates for minority nursing students to as high as 85%.  Clearly, the learning needs of minority baccalaureate degree nursing students are not being met.  It is evident that nursing educators need to focus more on retention strategies for minority student populations.  One method of increasing minority student retention is a shift in pedagogical approach away from the traditional nursing education of low-context pedagogy: reading assignments, lectures, and examinations.  This approach may not meet the needs of minority student populations (Bednarz, Schim, & Doorenbos, 2010).  Research conducted by Giddens (2008) cited that the creation of a student-centered pedagogy based on Ibarra’s Theory of Multi-Contextual Learning may be one means of addressing minority student retention.  This theory purports that the incongruence between student learning preferences and faculty teaching methods is problematic.  Students from diverse cultural backgrounds typically prefer high-context learning environments, such as telling stories, using case studies and simulation, and opportunities to learn together in groups. A qualitative study was designed to assess minority students’ perceptions of learning in a multi-contextual teaching/learning environment.  Minority was defined as someone who is a member of an ethnic or racial minority group and enrolled in a baccalaureate program of nursing.  The study took place in a single-purpose, private, Catholic nursing college in a single academic semester.  Appropriate IRB approvals were obtained.  Six minority students were recruited and completed a semi-structured interview of their perceptions of the multi-contextual teaching/learning environment.  Some of the qualitative data themes arising from the student interviews were: (1) preference for group work, (2) appreciation of personalized, student-centered, active teaching/learning strategies, and (3) preference for rapid application of knowledge.  This data points to the positive impact of multi-contextual teaching/learning environments on pre-licensure minority nursing student perceptions of learning.
Keywords:
Multi-contextual learning; Student-centered pedagogy; Minority student experience
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15H08
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleImpact of Multicontextual Teaching/Learning on Minority BSN Student Engagement: A Qualitative Research Studyen
dc.title.alternativeEducation Strategies in Undergraduate Nursing [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorDolan, Scott C.en
dc.contributor.departmentRho Omicronen
dc.author.detailsScott C. Dolan, RN, sdolan@mccn.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/603088en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Tuesday, November 10, 2015: Lack of diversity among nursing and student nursing populations is not a new issue.  As early as 2004, the Sullivan Report called on the healthcare professions to increase the number of minorities within the ranks.  Many healthcare professions, including nursing, answered this call by focusing efforts on increased minority student recruitment.  However, despite the increased focus on recruitment, numbers of ethnically diverse healthcare professionals still remain low.  Statistics provided by the Budden, Zhong, Moulton, and Cimiotti (2013) indicated that only 19 percent of registered nurses were of a racial or ethnic background.  In light of the continued lack of diversity within the ranks of the registered nursing population, the National League for Nursing (2009) cited the measurement of academic outcomes of diverse nursing student populations as a priority research area.  Despite attempts to increase enrollment of minority nursing students, retention while in the traditional pre-licensure nursing programs remains a problem.  Increased rates of minority student attrition have been attributed to several factors.  Multiple research studies that cite lack of academic preparation as a key factor contributing to increased rates of attrition among minority (Martinez, Sher, Krull, & Wood, 2009; The Sullivan Commission, 2004).  Additionally, researchers from Brown and Marshall (2008) noted poor test taking skills caused increased levels of attrition among minority baccalaureate nursing students.  Lofton, Newman, Dumas, Gilden, and Bond (2012) reported that a lack of consistent documentation regarding attrition rates and that some have estimated attrition rates for minority nursing students to as high as 85%.  Clearly, the learning needs of minority baccalaureate degree nursing students are not being met.  It is evident that nursing educators need to focus more on retention strategies for minority student populations.  One method of increasing minority student retention is a shift in pedagogical approach away from the traditional nursing education of low-context pedagogy: reading assignments, lectures, and examinations.  This approach may not meet the needs of minority student populations (Bednarz, Schim, & Doorenbos, 2010).  Research conducted by Giddens (2008) cited that the creation of a student-centered pedagogy based on Ibarra’s Theory of Multi-Contextual Learning may be one means of addressing minority student retention.  This theory purports that the incongruence between student learning preferences and faculty teaching methods is problematic.  Students from diverse cultural backgrounds typically prefer high-context learning environments, such as telling stories, using case studies and simulation, and opportunities to learn together in groups. A qualitative study was designed to assess minority students’ perceptions of learning in a multi-contextual teaching/learning environment.  Minority was defined as someone who is a member of an ethnic or racial minority group and enrolled in a baccalaureate program of nursing.  The study took place in a single-purpose, private, Catholic nursing college in a single academic semester.  Appropriate IRB approvals were obtained.  Six minority students were recruited and completed a semi-structured interview of their perceptions of the multi-contextual teaching/learning environment.  Some of the qualitative data themes arising from the student interviews were: (1) preference for group work, (2) appreciation of personalized, student-centered, active teaching/learning strategies, and (3) preference for rapid application of knowledge.  This data points to the positive impact of multi-contextual teaching/learning environments on pre-licensure minority nursing student perceptions of learning.en
dc.subjectMulti-contextual learningen
dc.subjectStudent-centered pedagogyen
dc.subjectMinority student experienceen
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:43:03Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:43:03Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
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