2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/603090
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
In Their Shoes: A Poverty Simulation
Other Titles:
Technology That is Transforming Nursing [Session]
Author(s):
Paik, Jacqueline; Wright, Dolores J.; Wright, Dolores J.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Gamma Alpha
Author Details:
Jacqueline Paik, RN, PHN, jpaik@llu.edu; Dolores J. Wright, RN, PHN
Abstract:
Session presented on Tuesday, November 10, 2015: Abstract Background: Poverty is the most influential social determinant of health. Because nurses care for people from all socioeconomic groups, they will encounter people who live in poverty who often feel that health care providers are frequently insensitive to their needs and concerns. Therefore it is incumbent upon nursing faculty to address poverty-related-to-health issues with their students. Purpose: The goal of this educational experience was to use and evaluate a poverty simulation that explores undergraduate public health nursing (PHN) students’ attitudes about those living in poverty. Description: A four hour poverty simulation was included as part of the students’ clinical experience. The simulation was conducted within a school of nursing’s conference rooms and classrooms, each of which offered an experience that a family in poverty likely has. These experiences included taking public transportation, paying bills, dealing with daily needs (groceries and school crises), filling out annual paperwork for various agencies, attending health care appointments, and interacting with the police. Prior to proceeding through these experiences, students completed attitudes toward poverty (ATP) scale and were preassigned to a “family” of three to four members. After completing the simulation the students again completed the ATP scale and participated in a debriefing session. Findings: Debriefings with students illuminated themes, including: 1) Receiving government assistance is harder than people think; 2) Poverty isn’t about being lazy; 3) Poverty creates a snowball effect in the family. Based on student feedback, the simulation was successful in sensitizing PHN students to the experiences of living in poverty.
Keywords:
Nursing education; Poverty simulation; Affective domain
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15H04
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleIn Their Shoes: A Poverty Simulationen
dc.title.alternativeTechnology That is Transforming Nursing [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorPaik, Jacquelineen
dc.contributor.authorWright, Dolores J.en
dc.contributor.authorWright, Dolores J.en
dc.contributor.departmentGamma Alphaen
dc.author.detailsJacqueline Paik, RN, PHN, jpaik@llu.edu; Dolores J. Wright, RN, PHNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/603090en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Tuesday, November 10, 2015: Abstract Background: Poverty is the most influential social determinant of health. Because nurses care for people from all socioeconomic groups, they will encounter people who live in poverty who often feel that health care providers are frequently insensitive to their needs and concerns. Therefore it is incumbent upon nursing faculty to address poverty-related-to-health issues with their students. Purpose: The goal of this educational experience was to use and evaluate a poverty simulation that explores undergraduate public health nursing (PHN) students’ attitudes about those living in poverty. Description: A four hour poverty simulation was included as part of the students’ clinical experience. The simulation was conducted within a school of nursing’s conference rooms and classrooms, each of which offered an experience that a family in poverty likely has. These experiences included taking public transportation, paying bills, dealing with daily needs (groceries and school crises), filling out annual paperwork for various agencies, attending health care appointments, and interacting with the police. Prior to proceeding through these experiences, students completed attitudes toward poverty (ATP) scale and were preassigned to a “family” of three to four members. After completing the simulation the students again completed the ATP scale and participated in a debriefing session. Findings: Debriefings with students illuminated themes, including: 1) Receiving government assistance is harder than people think; 2) Poverty isn’t about being lazy; 3) Poverty creates a snowball effect in the family. Based on student feedback, the simulation was successful in sensitizing PHN students to the experiences of living in poverty.en
dc.subjectNursing educationen
dc.subjectPoverty simulationen
dc.subjectAffective domainen
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:43:06Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:43:06Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
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