Reflection Beyond Action: A Modified Version of Tanner's Clinical Judgment Model

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/603110
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Reflection Beyond Action: A Modified Version of Tanner's Clinical Judgment Model
Other Titles:
Evaluation of Clinically Relevant Tools and Methods [Session]
Author(s):
Peisachovich, Eva
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Eva Peisachovich, RN, peva@yorku.ca
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, November 9, 2015: The concept of Reflection-Beyond-Action emerged from the data analysis of a recent study that explored internationally educated nurses’ (IENs) experience and understanding of clinical judgment when engaged in a simulated clinical environment. I observed that all participants corroborated that their worldview changed due to their experience in this study; further, participants illustrated this point as, through their participation, they gained a broader and more inclusive understanding of the influence of cultural differences and its overall impact on professional competence and clinical judgment. This understanding stemmed from the participants’ reflection-in-action and reflection-on-action, which ultimately led participants to self-awareness and critical consciousness of the meaning of patient care and overall nursing practice. In the context of this study, I refer to this awareness as reflection-beyond-action. In this context, reflection-beyond-action refers to provide an ability to recognize how the reflection of societal influences and the dynamics of culture and communication impact the way one perceives oneself and others. Reflection-beyond-action is an approach that provides one with the ability to interpret and view practice as a holistic approach to care. This process of reflection elicited the participants’ interpretations by gaining access to their thoughts, feelings, values, and actions. In doing so, it led participants to recognize the challenges they face as they transition to practice, as illustrated by the notion of unlearning and unknowing. The findings of the study suggest that unlearning is a process of building expertise and that old knowledge is foundational to the creation of new knowledge. Through reflection, participants were able to recognize the need for self-observation in order to be self  informed and to unlearn.  Unlearning brings one closer to developing as a professional and to gaining professional competence, as it provides a broader perception of both the world and the individual’s role in it. Unknowing emerged through participants’ experience of being underexposed or unexposed to circumstances presented in the study and was determined to be a prerequisite to knowing. Both unlearning and unknowing are integral to the education of IENs, as they call upon the learner to examine prior beliefs and assumptions and to consider their implications for practice. This, in turn, impacts practice, as who we are is who we bring to practice.   The analysis of this study led to a modified Tanner’s Model of Clinical Judgment by adding another layer to the “reflecting” stage. The modified version includes the concepts of unlearning and unknowing.  Ultimately, this integration provides the practitioner with the ability to reflect beyond action. This paper provides potential approaches to apply the concept of reflection-beyond-action in the context of clinical judgment in both the education of IENs and the nursing profession.
Keywords:
TYPE NEW KEYWORD HERE; TYPE NEW KEYWORD HERE; TYPE NEW KEYWORD HERE
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15E03
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleReflection Beyond Action: A Modified Version of Tanner's Clinical Judgment Modelen
dc.title.alternativeEvaluation of Clinically Relevant Tools and Methods [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorPeisachovich, Evaen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsEva Peisachovich, RN, peva@yorku.caen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/603110en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, November 9, 2015: The concept of Reflection-Beyond-Action emerged from the data analysis of a recent study that explored internationally educated nurses’ (IENs) experience and understanding of clinical judgment when engaged in a simulated clinical environment. I observed that all participants corroborated that their worldview changed due to their experience in this study; further, participants illustrated this point as, through their participation, they gained a broader and more inclusive understanding of the influence of cultural differences and its overall impact on professional competence and clinical judgment. This understanding stemmed from the participants’ reflection-in-action and reflection-on-action, which ultimately led participants to self-awareness and critical consciousness of the meaning of patient care and overall nursing practice. In the context of this study, I refer to this awareness as reflection-beyond-action. In this context, reflection-beyond-action refers to provide an ability to recognize how the reflection of societal influences and the dynamics of culture and communication impact the way one perceives oneself and others. Reflection-beyond-action is an approach that provides one with the ability to interpret and view practice as a holistic approach to care. This process of reflection elicited the participants’ interpretations by gaining access to their thoughts, feelings, values, and actions. In doing so, it led participants to recognize the challenges they face as they transition to practice, as illustrated by the notion of unlearning and unknowing. The findings of the study suggest that unlearning is a process of building expertise and that old knowledge is foundational to the creation of new knowledge. Through reflection, participants were able to recognize the need for self-observation in order to be self  informed and to unlearn.  Unlearning brings one closer to developing as a professional and to gaining professional competence, as it provides a broader perception of both the world and the individual’s role in it. Unknowing emerged through participants’ experience of being underexposed or unexposed to circumstances presented in the study and was determined to be a prerequisite to knowing. Both unlearning and unknowing are integral to the education of IENs, as they call upon the learner to examine prior beliefs and assumptions and to consider their implications for practice. This, in turn, impacts practice, as who we are is who we bring to practice.   The analysis of this study led to a modified Tanner’s Model of Clinical Judgment by adding another layer to the “reflecting” stage. The modified version includes the concepts of unlearning and unknowing.  Ultimately, this integration provides the practitioner with the ability to reflect beyond action. This paper provides potential approaches to apply the concept of reflection-beyond-action in the context of clinical judgment in both the education of IENs and the nursing profession.en
dc.subjectTYPE NEW KEYWORD HEREen
dc.subjectTYPE NEW KEYWORD HEREen
dc.subjectTYPE NEW KEYWORD HEREen
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:43:31Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:43:31Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
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