Meaningful Lifelong Learning in Nursing Education: Barriers, Facilitators, and Outcomes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/603120
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Meaningful Lifelong Learning in Nursing Education: Barriers, Facilitators, and Outcomes
Other Titles:
Outcomes of Professional and Student Nursing Practice [Session]
Author(s):
Coffey, Sue; Zitzelsberger, Hilde; Graham, Leslie L. M.; Lindsay, Gail M.; Anyinam, Charles; Vanderlee, Rick; Zitzelsberger, Hilde; Graham, Leslie L. M.; Lindsay, Gail M.; Anyinam, Charles; Vanderlee, Rick
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Zeta Nu
Author Details:
Sue Coffey, RN, sue.coffey@uoit.ca; Hilde Zitzelsberger, RN; Leslie L. M. Graham, RN, BScN, MN; Gail M. Lindsay, RN; Charles Anyinam, RN; Rick Vanderlee, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Tuesday, November 10, 2015: Education of nurses from one level to another is a global phenomenon that is increasing in visibility (Cook, Dover, Dickson & Engh, 2010; Cubit & Lopez, 2011; Rapley, Davidson, Nathan, & Dhaliwal, 2008). However, it is not without challenges. Within the North American context, educational innovation continues to be met with resistance. For example, some nurse educators still believe that Registered Practical Nurses (RPNs) should not be able to bridge into a BScN Program, while being awarded credit for Practical Nursing courses. Nursing bridging education is often referred to disparagingly as a ‘backdoor’ route to becoming a Registered Nurse. In this sense, old politics of post-secondary education have infused the debate, with the college/university traditional divide rearing its head. This is an unsettling context within which to offer an RPN to BScN Bridging Program, prompting the need for rigorous evaluation of this type of educational offering. This presentation provides an overview of an expanded, six-partner evaluation of RPN-to-BScN bridging education in Ontario, Canada. Using a mixed-method design, student and faculty perceptions of barriers, facilitators, and outcomes of this type of educational innovation across a variety of program offerings was explored. Qualitative analysis of student perceptions of the impact of bridging education on personal and professional levels will be summarized. Quantitative analysis of student performance and behaviours will be discussed, including indicators such as transfer credit, time to program completion, attrition/retention rates, and average years out between the completion of a Practical Nursing diploma and the start of a bridging program. Academic performance of nursing bridging students compared to other nursing students and health sciences students will be described. Finally, this presentation will discuss the merits and challenges of creating meaningful lifelong learning opportunities for nurses that lead to both enhanced professional development for individual nurses and overall advancement of the nursing profession.
Keywords:
briding education; educational innovation
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15G25
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleMeaningful Lifelong Learning in Nursing Education: Barriers, Facilitators, and Outcomesen
dc.title.alternativeOutcomes of Professional and Student Nursing Practice [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorCoffey, Sueen
dc.contributor.authorZitzelsberger, Hildeen
dc.contributor.authorGraham, Leslie L. M.en
dc.contributor.authorLindsay, Gail M.en
dc.contributor.authorAnyinam, Charlesen
dc.contributor.authorVanderlee, Ricken
dc.contributor.authorZitzelsberger, Hildeen
dc.contributor.authorGraham, Leslie L. M.en
dc.contributor.authorLindsay, Gail M.en
dc.contributor.authorAnyinam, Charlesen
dc.contributor.authorVanderlee, Ricken
dc.contributor.departmentZeta Nuen
dc.author.detailsSue Coffey, RN, sue.coffey@uoit.ca; Hilde Zitzelsberger, RN; Leslie L. M. Graham, RN, BScN, MN; Gail M. Lindsay, RN; Charles Anyinam, RN; Rick Vanderlee, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/603120en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Tuesday, November 10, 2015: Education of nurses from one level to another is a global phenomenon that is increasing in visibility (Cook, Dover, Dickson & Engh, 2010; Cubit & Lopez, 2011; Rapley, Davidson, Nathan, & Dhaliwal, 2008). However, it is not without challenges. Within the North American context, educational innovation continues to be met with resistance. For example, some nurse educators still believe that Registered Practical Nurses (RPNs) should not be able to bridge into a BScN Program, while being awarded credit for Practical Nursing courses. Nursing bridging education is often referred to disparagingly as a ‘backdoor’ route to becoming a Registered Nurse. In this sense, old politics of post-secondary education have infused the debate, with the college/university traditional divide rearing its head. This is an unsettling context within which to offer an RPN to BScN Bridging Program, prompting the need for rigorous evaluation of this type of educational offering. This presentation provides an overview of an expanded, six-partner evaluation of RPN-to-BScN bridging education in Ontario, Canada. Using a mixed-method design, student and faculty perceptions of barriers, facilitators, and outcomes of this type of educational innovation across a variety of program offerings was explored. Qualitative analysis of student perceptions of the impact of bridging education on personal and professional levels will be summarized. Quantitative analysis of student performance and behaviours will be discussed, including indicators such as transfer credit, time to program completion, attrition/retention rates, and average years out between the completion of a Practical Nursing diploma and the start of a bridging program. Academic performance of nursing bridging students compared to other nursing students and health sciences students will be described. Finally, this presentation will discuss the merits and challenges of creating meaningful lifelong learning opportunities for nurses that lead to both enhanced professional development for individual nurses and overall advancement of the nursing profession.en
dc.subjectbriding educationen
dc.subjecteducational innovationen
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:43:42Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:43:42Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.