2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/603151
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Changing the Behavior of the Caribbean Immigrants in Toronto
Other Titles:
Evidence-Based Practices to Promote Quality of Life in Patients with Chronic Diseases [Session]
Author(s):
Persaud, Khelesh
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Omicron Delta
Author Details:
Khelesh Persaud, RN, kpersaud@ryerson.ca
Abstract:
Session presented on Tuesday, November 10, 2015: Changing the Behavior of the Caribbean Immigrants in Toronto The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the Canadian diabetes health education program in changing the behavior of Caribbean immigrants in Toronto with Type 2 diabetes using the health belief model. There is limited information in the literature about this topic. Previous studies conducted on the Caribbean population's Type 2 diabetics did not include sufficient educational information to meet the needs of the Caribbean people to decrease further health complications. This quasiexperimental study built upon existing research that suggested there is an overwhelming desire for culturally- sensitive diabetes self-management education. The sample consisted of 128 adults between the ages of 35 to 60 years with a history of Type 2 diabetes in the Scarborough community in Toronto. Participants were randomly assigned to the intervention or control groups by recruitment number to assess the effect of education using a pretest and posttest design. Data were analyzed via t tests, which showed significant differences between the intervention and control groups. The implications for social change included practitioners working with the Caribbean immigrant population for the reduction of total national health care expenditures through improved diabetes health care education, particularly in handling culturally-specific cases. Providing culturally-tailored education to the diabetic Type 2 population will not only decrease acute and chronic complications but will also promote a better quality of life, self-care, knowledge, and understanding of the disease process.
Keywords:
Diabetes; Education; Caribbean
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15G08
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleChanging the Behavior of the Caribbean Immigrants in Torontoen
dc.title.alternativeEvidence-Based Practices to Promote Quality of Life in Patients with Chronic Diseases [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorPersaud, Kheleshen
dc.contributor.departmentOmicron Deltaen
dc.author.detailsKhelesh Persaud, RN, kpersaud@ryerson.caen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/603151en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Tuesday, November 10, 2015: Changing the Behavior of the Caribbean Immigrants in Toronto The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the Canadian diabetes health education program in changing the behavior of Caribbean immigrants in Toronto with Type 2 diabetes using the health belief model. There is limited information in the literature about this topic. Previous studies conducted on the Caribbean population's Type 2 diabetics did not include sufficient educational information to meet the needs of the Caribbean people to decrease further health complications. This quasiexperimental study built upon existing research that suggested there is an overwhelming desire for culturally- sensitive diabetes self-management education. The sample consisted of 128 adults between the ages of 35 to 60 years with a history of Type 2 diabetes in the Scarborough community in Toronto. Participants were randomly assigned to the intervention or control groups by recruitment number to assess the effect of education using a pretest and posttest design. Data were analyzed via t tests, which showed significant differences between the intervention and control groups. The implications for social change included practitioners working with the Caribbean immigrant population for the reduction of total national health care expenditures through improved diabetes health care education, particularly in handling culturally-specific cases. Providing culturally-tailored education to the diabetic Type 2 population will not only decrease acute and chronic complications but will also promote a better quality of life, self-care, knowledge, and understanding of the disease process.en
dc.subjectDiabetesen
dc.subjectEducationen
dc.subjectCaribbeanen
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:44:23Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:44:23Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
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