Exploring Cervical Cancer Treatments, Coping and Women's Sexual Self-Concept after Cervical Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/603198
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Exploring Cervical Cancer Treatments, Coping and Women's Sexual Self-Concept after Cervical Cancer
Other Titles:
Health Promotion in the Oncology Patient [Session]
Author(s):
Hollie, Barbara
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Pi Delta
Author Details:
Barbara Hollie, RN, ANP-BC, jbhollie@umflint.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, November 9, 2015: Background:  There is a long history of physical, psychological and sexual sequalae and stress associated with cervical cancer and treatment. The disease is stressful and it dramatically impairs sexuality and how women adjust after the disease and treatment. Yet, women and their families usually content with these circumstances in silence and for prolonged periods of time. How well women cope with cervical cancer and the related issues has long been thought to be important to their survivorship. Which strategies would help and when, was equally important. No empirical studies were found that focused on the relationship between coping and its association to women’s sexual self-concept. Sexual self-concept was defined as a combination of perceptions, beliefs, attitudes, and feelings that women hold about their sexual selves (Vickberg & Deaux, 2005). Just as self-concept is believed to be integral to being whole (Roy, 2009), sexual self-concept is conjectured to be an important part of women’s holism.  Purpose:  The purpose of this study was to identify predictor sexual self-concept variables and examine associations among cervical cancer treatment, select demographic variables, coping and women’s sexual self-concept. Methods:  A cross-sectional, descriptive correlational design was utilized to examine relationships among cervical cancer treatment (e.g. surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy and combinations), select demographic variables (e.g. age, race, cervical cancer stage, SES, subjective-objective health status, time since treatment began), coping (e.g. cognitive coping, positive or negative religious coping), and sexual self-concept (e.g. sexual-esteem and sexual satisfaction).  Results:  No significant relations were identified between age, race, and cancer treatment. Cognitive coping concepts were important predictors of sexual self-concept and important associations between the coping variables and selected demographics were found. Significant relationships were found between health status and religious coping and overall the further women were from treatment the less cognitive coping was used. The sample of 99 women was diverse with 55% white women, 17% women of color that included African American, Hispanic, American Indian/Alaska Native and mixed race, including heterosexual and homosexual women from 20 years to over 70 years of age, 70% had some college or a degree and reported a $35, 000 or more income. Findings revealed support for the coping variables as predictors related to women’s sexual self-concept.   Conclusions:  Understanding how women cope prior to cancer treatment can be instructive to strategies to maintain/encourage a positive sexual self-concept and lessen stress during cervical cancer treatment.    Vicksberg, S. M. J. & Deaux, K. (2005). Measuring the dimensions of women’s sexuality:  The women’s sexual self-concept scale. Sex Roles, 53(5/6), 361-369. Roy, C. (2009). The Roy adaptation model (3rd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.
Keywords:
Sexual Self-Concept; Coping
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15F01
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleExploring Cervical Cancer Treatments, Coping and Women's Sexual Self-Concept after Cervical Canceren
dc.title.alternativeHealth Promotion in the Oncology Patient [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorHollie, Barbaraen
dc.contributor.departmentPi Deltaen
dc.author.detailsBarbara Hollie, RN, ANP-BC, jbhollie@umflint.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/603198en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, November 9, 2015: Background:  There is a long history of physical, psychological and sexual sequalae and stress associated with cervical cancer and treatment. The disease is stressful and it dramatically impairs sexuality and how women adjust after the disease and treatment. Yet, women and their families usually content with these circumstances in silence and for prolonged periods of time. How well women cope with cervical cancer and the related issues has long been thought to be important to their survivorship. Which strategies would help and when, was equally important. No empirical studies were found that focused on the relationship between coping and its association to women’s sexual self-concept. Sexual self-concept was defined as a combination of perceptions, beliefs, attitudes, and feelings that women hold about their sexual selves (Vickberg & Deaux, 2005). Just as self-concept is believed to be integral to being whole (Roy, 2009), sexual self-concept is conjectured to be an important part of women’s holism.  Purpose:  The purpose of this study was to identify predictor sexual self-concept variables and examine associations among cervical cancer treatment, select demographic variables, coping and women’s sexual self-concept. Methods:  A cross-sectional, descriptive correlational design was utilized to examine relationships among cervical cancer treatment (e.g. surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy and combinations), select demographic variables (e.g. age, race, cervical cancer stage, SES, subjective-objective health status, time since treatment began), coping (e.g. cognitive coping, positive or negative religious coping), and sexual self-concept (e.g. sexual-esteem and sexual satisfaction).  Results:  No significant relations were identified between age, race, and cancer treatment. Cognitive coping concepts were important predictors of sexual self-concept and important associations between the coping variables and selected demographics were found. Significant relationships were found between health status and religious coping and overall the further women were from treatment the less cognitive coping was used. The sample of 99 women was diverse with 55% white women, 17% women of color that included African American, Hispanic, American Indian/Alaska Native and mixed race, including heterosexual and homosexual women from 20 years to over 70 years of age, 70% had some college or a degree and reported a $35, 000 or more income. Findings revealed support for the coping variables as predictors related to women’s sexual self-concept.   Conclusions:  Understanding how women cope prior to cancer treatment can be instructive to strategies to maintain/encourage a positive sexual self-concept and lessen stress during cervical cancer treatment.    Vicksberg, S. M. J. & Deaux, K. (2005). Measuring the dimensions of women’s sexuality:  The women’s sexual self-concept scale. Sex Roles, 53(5/6), 361-369. Roy, C. (2009). The Roy adaptation model (3rd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.en
dc.subjectSexual Self-Concepten
dc.subjectCopingen
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:45:25Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:45:25Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
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