Enhancing the Patient Safety Culture of ABSN Students through Instruction on Medical Error Recovery

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/603250
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Enhancing the Patient Safety Culture of ABSN Students through Instruction on Medical Error Recovery
Other Titles:
Engaging Students in Research and Practice [Session]
Author(s):
Burke, Darlene Mary
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Gamma Gamma
Author Details:
Darlene Mary Burke, RN, darlene.burke@gmail.com
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, November 9, 2015: Attitudes toward patient safety are the foundation of patient safety culture. Nursing students begin to formulate their patient safety attitudes while in educational programs. Nursing faculty have been challenged in their efforts to enhance the patient safety culture of students because there is a lack of empirical evidence as to which teaching strategies positively affect student attitudes toward patient safety. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between a 50-minute teaching module based upon the concept of medical error recovery and 9 dimensions of patient safety culture as measured by the Attitudes to Patient Safety Questionnaire (APSQ III). The guiding framework for the study was the reciprocal interactive theory of patient safety culture in nursing. The conceptual model used to illuminate the role of nurses in recovering medical errors in the educational intervention was the modified Eindhoven model of near-miss events. The sample comprised 4 student cohorts (N = 142) enrolled in an accelerated bachelor of science in nursing (ABSN) program at one university, with 4 participants lost to follow-up (n = 138). A quasi-experimental, nonequivalent control group, pretest/posttest design was used to compare mean attitude scores between the control (n = 75) group and the intervention group (n = 63) after statistically controlling for the pretest. ANCOVA revealed statistically higher mean attitude scores for the intervention group in 5 of 9 dimensions of patient safety culture with a small-medium effect size associated with the intervention: patient safety training, error inevitability, professional incompetence as error cause, patient's role in error, and importance of patient safety culture in curriculum. The results supported the use of a short-duration educational session on medical error recovery to enhance a subset of patient safety culture dimensions among ABSN students.
Keywords:
patient safety culture; medical error recovery; nursing students
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15E24
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleEnhancing the Patient Safety Culture of ABSN Students through Instruction on Medical Error Recoveryen
dc.title.alternativeEngaging Students in Research and Practice [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorBurke, Darlene Maryen
dc.contributor.departmentGamma Gammaen
dc.author.detailsDarlene Mary Burke, RN, darlene.burke@gmail.comen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/603250en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, November 9, 2015: Attitudes toward patient safety are the foundation of patient safety culture. Nursing students begin to formulate their patient safety attitudes while in educational programs. Nursing faculty have been challenged in their efforts to enhance the patient safety culture of students because there is a lack of empirical evidence as to which teaching strategies positively affect student attitudes toward patient safety. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between a 50-minute teaching module based upon the concept of medical error recovery and 9 dimensions of patient safety culture as measured by the Attitudes to Patient Safety Questionnaire (APSQ III). The guiding framework for the study was the reciprocal interactive theory of patient safety culture in nursing. The conceptual model used to illuminate the role of nurses in recovering medical errors in the educational intervention was the modified Eindhoven model of near-miss events. The sample comprised 4 student cohorts (N = 142) enrolled in an accelerated bachelor of science in nursing (ABSN) program at one university, with 4 participants lost to follow-up (n = 138). A quasi-experimental, nonequivalent control group, pretest/posttest design was used to compare mean attitude scores between the control (n = 75) group and the intervention group (n = 63) after statistically controlling for the pretest. ANCOVA revealed statistically higher mean attitude scores for the intervention group in 5 of 9 dimensions of patient safety culture with a small-medium effect size associated with the intervention: patient safety training, error inevitability, professional incompetence as error cause, patient's role in error, and importance of patient safety culture in curriculum. The results supported the use of a short-duration educational session on medical error recovery to enhance a subset of patient safety culture dimensions among ABSN students.en
dc.subjectpatient safety cultureen
dc.subjectmedical error recoveryen
dc.subjectnursing studentsen
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:46:32Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:46:32Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
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