Fewer Ventilator Days with Dexmedetomidine Use for Patients Difficult to Extubate Implementation Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/603261
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Fewer Ventilator Days with Dexmedetomidine Use for Patients Difficult to Extubate Implementation Study
Other Titles:
Respiratory Related Illness and Care [Session]
Author(s):
Becker, Susan
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Eta Alpha
Author Details:
Susan Becker, RN, CNS, CCRN, CCNS, susan.becker@marymount.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Tuesday, November 10, 2015: Background Traditional sedation for mechanically ventilated patients causes delirium which increases the patients’ length of stay while hospitalized. When extubation is attempted, these medications must be discontinued due to the side effect of respiratory depression, leaving patients anxious and agitated, delaying extubation and prolonging the need for mechanical ventilation. Dexmedetomidine is an alternative sedative that does not cause delirium or respiratory depression. During the weaning process, dexmedetomidine can be continued, allowing the patient to remain calm and successfully extubated. Objectives To decrease the length of stay for mechanically ventilated patients by implementing a dexmedetomidine protocol for difficult to extubate patients during the weaning process. Methods A pre/post design study was done comparing the patient mean of length of stay on mechanical ventilation. A Mann-Whitney U-Test was used due to the small sample size. Results Over the three-month implementation period, 15 patients received dexmedetomidine. None of the patients experienced adverse reactions while on dexmedetomidine. There was a trend of decreasing mechanical ventilation length of stay but no significant difference was noted between the pre-implementation group and the post. Conclusion Dexmedetomidine was a safe alternative to traditional sedation for difficult to extubate patients when a bolus dose was not given.
Keywords:
dexmedetomidine; mechanical ventilation; sedation
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15H24
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleFewer Ventilator Days with Dexmedetomidine Use for Patients Difficult to Extubate Implementation Studyen
dc.title.alternativeRespiratory Related Illness and Care [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorBecker, Susanen
dc.contributor.departmentEta Alphaen
dc.author.detailsSusan Becker, RN, CNS, CCRN, CCNS, susan.becker@marymount.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/603261en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Tuesday, November 10, 2015: Background Traditional sedation for mechanically ventilated patients causes delirium which increases the patients’ length of stay while hospitalized. When extubation is attempted, these medications must be discontinued due to the side effect of respiratory depression, leaving patients anxious and agitated, delaying extubation and prolonging the need for mechanical ventilation. Dexmedetomidine is an alternative sedative that does not cause delirium or respiratory depression. During the weaning process, dexmedetomidine can be continued, allowing the patient to remain calm and successfully extubated. Objectives To decrease the length of stay for mechanically ventilated patients by implementing a dexmedetomidine protocol for difficult to extubate patients during the weaning process. Methods A pre/post design study was done comparing the patient mean of length of stay on mechanical ventilation. A Mann-Whitney U-Test was used due to the small sample size. Results Over the three-month implementation period, 15 patients received dexmedetomidine. None of the patients experienced adverse reactions while on dexmedetomidine. There was a trend of decreasing mechanical ventilation length of stay but no significant difference was noted between the pre-implementation group and the post. Conclusion Dexmedetomidine was a safe alternative to traditional sedation for difficult to extubate patients when a bolus dose was not given.en
dc.subjectdexmedetomidineen
dc.subjectmechanical ventilationen
dc.subjectsedationen
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:46:45Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:46:45Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
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