Academic/Clinical Partnerships and the Team Approach to DNP Practice Improvement Projects

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/603280
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Academic/Clinical Partnerships and the Team Approach to DNP Practice Improvement Projects
Other Titles:
Examples of Doctoral Education in Nursing [Session]
Author(s):
Levin, Rona
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Upsilon
Author Details:
Rona Levin, RN, rfl2039@nyu.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Tuesday, November 10, 2015: This presentation will focus on the win-win situation of partnering with clinical agencies for DNP Capstone Projects and five necessary components of such an approach. First, the philosophical and academic approach to capstone projects at New York University is to mimic the evidence-based practice improvement (EBPI) culture that graduates will be expected to facilitate/lead upon graduation. There is a clear differentiation between research and EBPI, which will be delineated. Implementing this approach in practice necessitates partnering with clinical agencies for improvement efforts. Key is focusing on the themes for improvement identified by the clinical agency. Second, students are placed in clinical agencies where they are not employed in order to avoid conflicts of interest related to student vs. employee performance. Three, teams consist of 2 to 3 students, a faculty mentor from the University and clinical mentor from the agency where students are placed. Fourth, teams are configured at the beginning of the first semester of study so that there is sufficient time (2 ½ years) for students to conduct an in depth assessment and become integrated into the agency culture. Fifth, most courses in the DNP curriculum have assignments related to the capstone project so that course content is immediately applied to development, implementation, and evaluation of projects. The first cohort to experience this team approach is completing studies in December 2014 and so data on their experiences and projects will be available for presentation as well as their overall program evaluation data.
Keywords:
Evidence-Based Practice Improvement; Capstone Projects; DNP
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15G06
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleAcademic/Clinical Partnerships and the Team Approach to DNP Practice Improvement Projectsen
dc.title.alternativeExamples of Doctoral Education in Nursing [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorLevin, Ronaen
dc.contributor.departmentUpsilonen
dc.author.detailsRona Levin, RN, rfl2039@nyu.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/603280en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Tuesday, November 10, 2015: This presentation will focus on the win-win situation of partnering with clinical agencies for DNP Capstone Projects and five necessary components of such an approach. First, the philosophical and academic approach to capstone projects at New York University is to mimic the evidence-based practice improvement (EBPI) culture that graduates will be expected to facilitate/lead upon graduation. There is a clear differentiation between research and EBPI, which will be delineated. Implementing this approach in practice necessitates partnering with clinical agencies for improvement efforts. Key is focusing on the themes for improvement identified by the clinical agency. Second, students are placed in clinical agencies where they are not employed in order to avoid conflicts of interest related to student vs. employee performance. Three, teams consist of 2 to 3 students, a faculty mentor from the University and clinical mentor from the agency where students are placed. Fourth, teams are configured at the beginning of the first semester of study so that there is sufficient time (2 ½ years) for students to conduct an in depth assessment and become integrated into the agency culture. Fifth, most courses in the DNP curriculum have assignments related to the capstone project so that course content is immediately applied to development, implementation, and evaluation of projects. The first cohort to experience this team approach is completing studies in December 2014 and so data on their experiences and projects will be available for presentation as well as their overall program evaluation data.en
dc.subjectEvidence-Based Practice Improvementen
dc.subjectCapstone Projectsen
dc.subjectDNPen
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:47:10Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:47:10Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
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