Exploring Symptom Experiences in Women with Peripartum Cardiomyopathy: A Mixed Method Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/603308
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Exploring Symptom Experiences in Women with Peripartum Cardiomyopathy: A Mixed Method Study
Other Titles:
Perinatal Innovations in Healthcare Promotion [Session]
Author(s):
Patel, Harshida
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Tau Omega
Author Details:
Harshida Patel, RN, MNSC, Senior Lecturer, harshida.patel@gu.se
Abstract:
Session presented on Tuesday, November 10, 2015: Exploring symptom experiences in women with peripartum cardiomyopathy: a mixed method study Harshida Patel, PhD, RN, APN, Senior Lecturer, Inst. Health Care & Science, Inst. of Health Care & Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe and explore women’s experiences of symptoms in PPCM. Methods: A triangulation of methods was performed comprising individual interviews with 19 women in Sweden with PPCM, and data were also collected from their medical records. Qualitative data from interviews were analysed by inductive content analysis, and quantitative data using descriptive statistics. Results: The meaning of onset and occurrence of symptoms is captured in the metaphor: being caught in a spider web , comprising the invasion of symptoms and feeling of helplessness. Symptoms related to PPCM started at gestational weeks 14-38 (median 32) and time from symptoms to diagnosis varied between 3–190 days (median 40). The physical symptoms were: shortness of breath, excessive fatigue and swelling, bloatedness, tachycardia, nausea, but also palpitation, coughing, chest tightness, bodily pain, headache, fever, tremor, dizziness, syncope, restless and tingly body and oliguria. Emotional symptoms were: fear, anxiety, feelings of panic, and thoughts of impending death. Conclusion: Symptoms of PPCM are debilitating, exhausting and frightening for women. Health care professionals, especially midwives, should be equipped with the skills needed to identify PPCM for early referral to a specialist. More research to elaborate midwives’ knowledge and attitude about PPCM is essential. Key words: Peripartum Cardiomyopathy; Pregnancy; Heart disease; Symptoms; Qualitative methods; Content analysis; Childbirth
Keywords:
Peripartum Cardiomyopathy; Pregnancy; Heart disease and symptoms
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15G19
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleExploring Symptom Experiences in Women with Peripartum Cardiomyopathy: A Mixed Method Studyen
dc.title.alternativePerinatal Innovations in Healthcare Promotion [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorPatel, Harshidaen
dc.contributor.departmentTau Omegaen
dc.author.detailsHarshida Patel, RN, MNSC, Senior Lecturer, harshida.patel@gu.seen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/603308en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Tuesday, November 10, 2015: Exploring symptom experiences in women with peripartum cardiomyopathy: a mixed method study Harshida Patel, PhD, RN, APN, Senior Lecturer, Inst. Health Care & Science, Inst. of Health Care & Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe and explore women’s experiences of symptoms in PPCM. Methods: A triangulation of methods was performed comprising individual interviews with 19 women in Sweden with PPCM, and data were also collected from their medical records. Qualitative data from interviews were analysed by inductive content analysis, and quantitative data using descriptive statistics. Results: The meaning of onset and occurrence of symptoms is captured in the metaphor: being caught in a spider web , comprising the invasion of symptoms and feeling of helplessness. Symptoms related to PPCM started at gestational weeks 14-38 (median 32) and time from symptoms to diagnosis varied between 3–190 days (median 40). The physical symptoms were: shortness of breath, excessive fatigue and swelling, bloatedness, tachycardia, nausea, but also palpitation, coughing, chest tightness, bodily pain, headache, fever, tremor, dizziness, syncope, restless and tingly body and oliguria. Emotional symptoms were: fear, anxiety, feelings of panic, and thoughts of impending death. Conclusion: Symptoms of PPCM are debilitating, exhausting and frightening for women. Health care professionals, especially midwives, should be equipped with the skills needed to identify PPCM for early referral to a specialist. More research to elaborate midwives’ knowledge and attitude about PPCM is essential. Key words: Peripartum Cardiomyopathy; Pregnancy; Heart disease; Symptoms; Qualitative methods; Content analysis; Childbirthen
dc.subjectPeripartum Cardiomyopathyen
dc.subjectPregnancyen
dc.subjectHeart disease and symptomsen
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:47:47Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:47:47Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
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