2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/603406
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Being a Leader in Chinese Nursing Education
Other Titles:
Promoting Global Nursing Education Through Ongoing Engagement [Symposium]
Author(s):
Liu, Qian
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Qian Liu, RN, liuqianpumc@sina.com
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, November 8, 2015: Chinese educators discuss the evolution of an international cooperation program at Wuhan HOPE School of Nursing, Wuhan, China.  They reflect on the adoption of a concept-based curriculum being taught in English and a Chinese dialect, integration of nursing simulation as a teaching strategy, the development of a nursing simulation lab, the opening of a comprehensive rehabilitation center at the School of Nursing and the changing role of Chinese nurse educators in this program.  They review the personal and professional growth that has occurred as young faculty members, influenced by Western thinking, have moved into leadership positions by virtue of interest, motivation and expectations of nursing administrators.  They discuss their concerns about the differing perspectives of traditionally trained mature nurse educators and those who have received enhanced educational opportunities and interacted with nurse educators from other countries.  They discuss the differences in the backgrounds of nurse leaders in health care practice and those in education settings.  They review the current Chinese perspective of the nursing profession and the changing health care culture.  They discuss their concerns about the need for nurses to assume larger roles in the community, enhanced independent practice, and health education. The economic reality of low nursing salaries, the changing dynamic of financing the Chinese health care system and the lack of understanding of Chinese people about nursing’s role are challenges in educating future nurse leaders.  Two Chinese educators share their personal perspectives in fulfilling full-time nurse educator positons and balancing the Chinese cultural expectations of advancing their education within the context of the role of a Chinese woman as a wife and mother.   There is also the looming concern of expectation of the role of the health care provider in meeting the demands of Chinese patients and the threat of violence and intimidation. Balancing the practice of traditional Chinese medicine with new advances in health care and technology has resulted in public distrust of an unregulated pharmaceutical industry which raises the tension between providers and patients.  The need for Chinese people to assume greater financial responsibility for their health care has also resulted in the widespread assumption that direct care providers, specifically physicians and nurses, are reaping financial benefits by providing specific treatments and practices.  The result is a lack of continuity in the provision of care.
Keywords:
transformational leadership; global educators; collaboration exchange
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15B16
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleBeing a Leader in Chinese Nursing Educationen
dc.title.alternativePromoting Global Nursing Education Through Ongoing Engagement [Symposium]en
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Qianen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsQian Liu, RN, liuqianpumc@sina.comen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/603406en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, November 8, 2015: Chinese educators discuss the evolution of an international cooperation program at Wuhan HOPE School of Nursing, Wuhan, China.  They reflect on the adoption of a concept-based curriculum being taught in English and a Chinese dialect, integration of nursing simulation as a teaching strategy, the development of a nursing simulation lab, the opening of a comprehensive rehabilitation center at the School of Nursing and the changing role of Chinese nurse educators in this program.  They review the personal and professional growth that has occurred as young faculty members, influenced by Western thinking, have moved into leadership positions by virtue of interest, motivation and expectations of nursing administrators.  They discuss their concerns about the differing perspectives of traditionally trained mature nurse educators and those who have received enhanced educational opportunities and interacted with nurse educators from other countries.  They discuss the differences in the backgrounds of nurse leaders in health care practice and those in education settings.  They review the current Chinese perspective of the nursing profession and the changing health care culture.  They discuss their concerns about the need for nurses to assume larger roles in the community, enhanced independent practice, and health education. The economic reality of low nursing salaries, the changing dynamic of financing the Chinese health care system and the lack of understanding of Chinese people about nursing’s role are challenges in educating future nurse leaders.  Two Chinese educators share their personal perspectives in fulfilling full-time nurse educator positons and balancing the Chinese cultural expectations of advancing their education within the context of the role of a Chinese woman as a wife and mother.   There is also the looming concern of expectation of the role of the health care provider in meeting the demands of Chinese patients and the threat of violence and intimidation. Balancing the practice of traditional Chinese medicine with new advances in health care and technology has resulted in public distrust of an unregulated pharmaceutical industry which raises the tension between providers and patients.  The need for Chinese people to assume greater financial responsibility for their health care has also resulted in the widespread assumption that direct care providers, specifically physicians and nurses, are reaping financial benefits by providing specific treatments and practices.  The result is a lack of continuity in the provision of care.en
dc.subjecttransformational leadershipen
dc.subjectglobal educatorsen
dc.subjectcollaboration exchangeen
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:49:58Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:49:58Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
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