2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/603414
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Residency Development, Design, and Implementation
Other Titles:
RNs in Transition: From Concept to Practice [Symposium]
Author(s):
Franqueiro, Tammy
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Alpha
Author Details:
Tammy Franqueiro, RN, RN-BC, tfranqueiro@versant.org
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, November 8, 2015: This session provides an overview of processes, models, and effective design principles that were foundational in developing a successful residency program. In 1999, the residency development team used a DACUM process for initial role delineation. The results, along with Benner’s (1984) Novice to Expert framework, provided the initial structure of the program. Presenters will describe how core and specialty competencies and supporting curricula have been identified and developed.  As a competency-based program, the Competency Outcomes Performance Assessment (COPA) Model is used as a framework to identify and develop essential competencies needed for clinical practice.  These competencies are then organized into categories and performance criteria using Quality & Safety Education for Nurses (Cronenwett, Sherwood, & Gelmon, 2009 ) as a framework and statement of objective.  To ensure currency and relevance competency and curricula development also rely on national professional nursing organization scope and standards of practice.The education and development of the interprofessional team is another key aspect of the residency described in this section. Subject matter experts, preceptors, mentors and debriefers are critical to the long term success of the program and have their own unique learning needs. The presentation will outline the education and support needed for these roles. Lastly, a description of practice-based learning will depict tools and strategies used to support the residents learning experiences at the point of care for it is when working directly with patients and their families that learning takes place (Benner, Hooper-Kyriakidis, & Stannard, 2011). Both initial and ongoing competency management are important aspects of the program. For residency stakeholders having the tools, support, and resources they need to support learning is essential for professional role development and the provision of safe patient-centered care.
Keywords:
Residency; competency development; program design
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15C15
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleResidency Development, Design, and Implementationen
dc.title.alternativeRNs in Transition: From Concept to Practice [Symposium]en
dc.contributor.authorFranqueiro, Tammyen
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Alphaen
dc.author.detailsTammy Franqueiro, RN, RN-BC, tfranqueiro@versant.orgen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/603414en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, November 8, 2015: This session provides an overview of processes, models, and effective design principles that were foundational in developing a successful residency program. In 1999, the residency development team used a DACUM process for initial role delineation. The results, along with Benner’s (1984) Novice to Expert framework, provided the initial structure of the program. Presenters will describe how core and specialty competencies and supporting curricula have been identified and developed.  As a competency-based program, the Competency Outcomes Performance Assessment (COPA) Model is used as a framework to identify and develop essential competencies needed for clinical practice.  These competencies are then organized into categories and performance criteria using Quality & Safety Education for Nurses (Cronenwett, Sherwood, & Gelmon, 2009 ) as a framework and statement of objective.  To ensure currency and relevance competency and curricula development also rely on national professional nursing organization scope and standards of practice.The education and development of the interprofessional team is another key aspect of the residency described in this section. Subject matter experts, preceptors, mentors and debriefers are critical to the long term success of the program and have their own unique learning needs. The presentation will outline the education and support needed for these roles. Lastly, a description of practice-based learning will depict tools and strategies used to support the residents learning experiences at the point of care for it is when working directly with patients and their families that learning takes place (Benner, Hooper-Kyriakidis, & Stannard, 2011). Both initial and ongoing competency management are important aspects of the program. For residency stakeholders having the tools, support, and resources they need to support learning is essential for professional role development and the provision of safe patient-centered care.en
dc.subjectResidencyen
dc.subjectcompetency developmenten
dc.subjectprogram designen
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:50:09Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:50:09Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
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