2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/603446
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Transforming an Educational Culture through a Model of Care
Other Titles:
Improving Institutional and Student Outcomes by Transformation to a Culture of Care [Symposium]
Author(s):
Groenwald, Susan L.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Phi Pi
Author Details:
Susan L. Groenwald, RN, ANEF, FAAN, sgroenwald@chamberlain.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, November 9, 2015: A recent Gallup poll revealed that a primary factor in an individual’s success in school and the workplace was having a faculty member who cared about them as a person; yet only 22 percent of those surveyed reported receiving such support in college.  At many educational institutions, students are left on their own to figure out how to persevere and are expected to be self-sufficient. Though this environment works for some students, particularly at elite institutions, many college students feel lost, lonely, confused, inadequate and anxious. To make matters worse, negative cultures at some institutions are discouraging graduates from becoming educators. At the January 2015 AACN Doctoral Forum, researchers reported a common theme across five studies funded by RWJF that evaluated DNP and PHD preparation:  The majority of students in both programs do not want an academic career because of the negative cultures they experienced while pursuing their education.  At the institution that is the focus of this symposium, there exists a belief that if we take extraordinary care of our students, they are more likely to be successful – motivated instead of pushed down, encouraged instead of berated. We believe that if we model the kinds of values and behaviors we want in extraordinary nurses, students are more likely to develop those important values and behaviors.  From these beliefs a model of student success was developed with three elements of care as the underpinning:  care of self, care of students, and care of faculty/staff.  The presenter is the institutional president who led the transformation of the institution to a culture of care and service so that it would be part of the organization’s DNA.  The presenter will describe the steps in the transformational process and provide examples of specific initiatives focused on the care of faculty and students including specific results of those initiatives.
Keywords:
Cultural transformation; Academic Leadership; Institutional Outcomes
Repository Posting Date:
21-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
21-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
CONV15D14
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
43rd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Description:
43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleTransforming an Educational Culture through a Model of Careen
dc.title.alternativeImproving Institutional and Student Outcomes by Transformation to a Culture of Care [Symposium]en
dc.contributor.authorGroenwald, Susan L.en
dc.contributor.departmentPhi Pien
dc.author.detailsSusan L. Groenwald, RN, ANEF, FAAN, sgroenwald@chamberlain.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/603446en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, November 9, 2015: A recent Gallup poll revealed that a primary factor in an individual’s success in school and the workplace was having a faculty member who cared about them as a person; yet only 22 percent of those surveyed reported receiving such support in college.  At many educational institutions, students are left on their own to figure out how to persevere and are expected to be self-sufficient. Though this environment works for some students, particularly at elite institutions, many college students feel lost, lonely, confused, inadequate and anxious. To make matters worse, negative cultures at some institutions are discouraging graduates from becoming educators. At the January 2015 AACN Doctoral Forum, researchers reported a common theme across five studies funded by RWJF that evaluated DNP and PHD preparation:  The majority of students in both programs do not want an academic career because of the negative cultures they experienced while pursuing their education.  At the institution that is the focus of this symposium, there exists a belief that if we take extraordinary care of our students, they are more likely to be successful – motivated instead of pushed down, encouraged instead of berated. We believe that if we model the kinds of values and behaviors we want in extraordinary nurses, students are more likely to develop those important values and behaviors.  From these beliefs a model of student success was developed with three elements of care as the underpinning:  care of self, care of students, and care of faculty/staff.  The presenter is the institutional president who led the transformation of the institution to a culture of care and service so that it would be part of the organization’s DNA.  The presenter will describe the steps in the transformational process and provide examples of specific initiatives focused on the care of faculty and students including specific results of those initiatives.en
dc.subjectCultural transformationen
dc.subjectAcademic Leadershipen
dc.subjectInstitutional Outcomesen
dc.date.available2016-03-21T16:50:52Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-21en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T16:50:52Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name43rd Biennial Conventionen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen
dc.description43rd Biennial Convention 2015 Theme: Serve Locally, Transform Regionally, Lead Globally.`en
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