Transition to Practice After Participation in a Student Nurse Associate Program: A Qualitative Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/603762
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Transition to Practice After Participation in a Student Nurse Associate Program: A Qualitative Study
Other Titles:
Student Issues: How They Feel [Session]
Author(s):
Hopkins, Kathleen W.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Mu Beta
Author Details:
Kathleen W. Hopkins, RN, CNE, khopkins@sunyrockland.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Friday, April 8, 2016: The aim of this qualitative, phenomenological study was to explore the lived experience of new graduate nurses who have completed a Student Nurse Associate Program during the summer between their junior and senior year of their baccalaureate nursing program.  This pre-licensure program was designed to support transition to professional practice by fostering confidence and competence, thus reducing fear and anxiety.  Purposive sampling in addition to the use of the snowball technique was used which yielded data saturation with a of sample of 12 nurses.  Data were generated by asking the participants to respond to four research questions during individual interviews.  The naturalistic inquiry of Lincoln and Guba and the data analysis method of Colaizzi were germane to the study.  This study revealed eight themes which were significant for new graduates to facilitate a smooth transition to professional practice.  These included: 1. Confidence: Growth during the program; 2. Delegation: A difficult challenge; 3. Communication: Learning how to interact with patients, families, and other healthcare professionals; 4. Competence: Perfecting basic skills; 5. Time Management: Developing organizational systems;   6. Work Environment: Learning practices, policies, and people; 7. Prioritization: Critical thinking in action; and 8. Collaboration: Becoming a team player.  The participants in the study reported improved abilities in all areas with the exception of delegation and prioritization; these two areas were not mastered to the same extent.  Most participants confirmed these areas were not perfected until they had been working as a registered nurse for a period of time.  This study has contributed to the science of nursing and knowledge development regarding transition to practice.  Further research  is needed to include a larger and more diverse sample.  Additional research should focus on comparisons between pre-licensure and post-licensure programs in terms of cost, efficacy, and outcomes. Transition support programs are becoming a reality due to recommendations by the Institute of Medicine, the Joint Commission, and the National Council of State Boards of Nursing.  Nursing leaders in academia and practice need to collaborate to determine best practices to support new nurses which leads to increased retention and nurse satisfaction.
Keywords:
Transition to practice; New graduate readiness; Pre-licensure support programs
Repository Posting Date:
29-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
29-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
NERC16A04
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2016
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, and National League for Nursing
Conference Location:
Washington, DC
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference Theme: Research as a Catalyst for Transformative Practice

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleTransition to Practice After Participation in a Student Nurse Associate Program: A Qualitative Studyen
dc.title.alternativeStudent Issues: How They Feel [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorHopkins, Kathleen W.en
dc.contributor.departmentMu Betaen
dc.author.detailsKathleen W. Hopkins, RN, CNE, khopkins@sunyrockland.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/603762en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Friday, April 8, 2016: The aim of this qualitative, phenomenological study was to explore the lived experience of new graduate nurses who have completed a Student Nurse Associate Program during the summer between their junior and senior year of their baccalaureate nursing program.  This pre-licensure program was designed to support transition to professional practice by fostering confidence and competence, thus reducing fear and anxiety.  Purposive sampling in addition to the use of the snowball technique was used which yielded data saturation with a of sample of 12 nurses.  Data were generated by asking the participants to respond to four research questions during individual interviews.  The naturalistic inquiry of Lincoln and Guba and the data analysis method of Colaizzi were germane to the study.  This study revealed eight themes which were significant for new graduates to facilitate a smooth transition to professional practice.  These included: 1. Confidence: Growth during the program; 2. Delegation: A difficult challenge; 3. Communication: Learning how to interact with patients, families, and other healthcare professionals; 4. Competence: Perfecting basic skills; 5. Time Management: Developing organizational systems;   6. Work Environment: Learning practices, policies, and people; 7. Prioritization: Critical thinking in action; and 8. Collaboration: Becoming a team player.  The participants in the study reported improved abilities in all areas with the exception of delegation and prioritization; these two areas were not mastered to the same extent.  Most participants confirmed these areas were not perfected until they had been working as a registered nurse for a period of time.  This study has contributed to the science of nursing and knowledge development regarding transition to practice.  Further research  is needed to include a larger and more diverse sample.  Additional research should focus on comparisons between pre-licensure and post-licensure programs in terms of cost, efficacy, and outcomes. Transition support programs are becoming a reality due to recommendations by the Institute of Medicine, the Joint Commission, and the National Council of State Boards of Nursing.  Nursing leaders in academia and practice need to collaborate to determine best practices to support new nurses which leads to increased retention and nurse satisfaction.en
dc.subjectTransition to practiceen
dc.subjectNew graduate readinessen
dc.subjectPre-licensure support programsen
dc.date.available2016-03-29T13:08:52Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-29en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-29T13:08:52Zen
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2016en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, and National League for Nursingen
dc.conference.locationWashington, DCen
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference Theme: Research as a Catalyst for Transformative Practiceen
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