Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP) Burnout: Differences Between Acute/Inpatient PMHNPs and Outpatient PMHNPs

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/603767
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Poster
Title:
Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP) Burnout: Differences Between Acute/Inpatient PMHNPs and Outpatient PMHNPs
Author(s):
Pourzand, Miriam
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Miriam Pourzand, RN, PMHNP-BC, mpour001@odu.edu
Abstract:

This item is part of a CNE course. The material is freely available in the Henderson Repository. The CNE course (and associated fee, if any) is not part of the Henderson Repository. To access the course please click on the applicable link on the CNE collection homepage: http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/620073. Note the start and end dates for the course. If the links to the CNE collection homepage or course are invalid, the course has ended. The item record and file will remain as a permanent entry in the repository in its original collection.

Session presented on Saturday, April 9, 2016, and Friday, April 8, 2016: Problem: Burnout has been shown to be problematic for those who care for patients with mental illness. Studies have shown that between 21 to 67 % of mental health providers have indicated high levels of burnout. It is important for mental health professionals to understand the symptoms associated with burnout; however, few studies have addressed primary mental health provider burnout. Little is known with regard to factors that influence Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP) burnout. PMHNPs are playing a an ever increasing role in behavioral health care in the United States, thus providing individuals that otherwise would not receive specialized care with much needed mental health services with the Department of Human Services Division of Mental Health Services, the Advanced Practice Nurse Initiative implemented recruitment of psychiatric nurse practitioners to fill the void. Thus increasing access to care for individuals suffering from psychiatric conditions primarily in outpatient behavioral health settings, serving over 3,000 individuals, including medication management and psychotherapy. Therefore, it is important to address provider burnout in this population to promote staff retention and quality care. EBP Questions: What is the level of burnout in PMHNPs? What are the factors contributing to burnout in PMHNPs? Is there a significant difference in the levels of burnout between acute/inpatient PMHNPs and outpatient PMHNPs?  Is there a significant difference in components of burnout between exhaustion, depersonalization, lack of feeling accomplished, job resources, job performance, and personal resources and components between acute/inpatient PMHNPs and outpatient PMHNPs? Methods: This study utilizes a casual comparative design to examine group differences in burnout between 50 PMHNPs working in acute/inpatient and 50 PMHNs working in outpatient behavioral health. A database of Nurse Practitioners will be implemented to locate participants to complete An anonymous, one time online self-report survey comprised of several questionnaires. Analyses include descriptive statistics, Independent sample t-tests to identify and compare differences in the levels of burnout and components of burnout amongst two groups of PMHNPS those working in acute and PMHNPs working in non-acute settings. Outcomes: Differences in levels of burnout and components of burnout between PMHNPs working in acute/inpatient and outpatient settings will be determined by The Maslach Burnout Inventory and Areas of Worklife questionnaire. Significance: This study will examine PMHNP burnout, a phenomenon that has not yet been explored in this group. With this knowledge, employers, policy makers, and practitioners can develop strategies to reduce burnout and improve job satisfaction, retention rates, and quality of life for PMHNPs.
Keywords:
Burnout; Values; Depersonalization
Repository Posting Date:
29-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
29-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
NERC16PST67
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2016
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, and National League for Nursing
Conference Location:
Washington, DC
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference Theme: Research as a Catalyst for Transformative Practice

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titlePsychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP) Burnout: Differences Between Acute/Inpatient PMHNPs and Outpatient PMHNPsen
dc.contributor.authorPourzand, Miriamen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsMiriam Pourzand, RN, PMHNP-BC, mpour001@odu.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/603767en
dc.description.abstract<p><font color="red"><em>This item is part of a CNE course. The material is freely available in the Henderson Repository. The CNE course (and associated fee, if any) is not part of the Henderson Repository. To access the course please click on the applicable link on the CNE collection homepage: <a href="http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/620073" target="_blank"> http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/620073</a>. Note the start and end dates for the course. If the links to the CNE collection homepage or course are invalid, the course has ended. The item record and file will remain as a permanent entry in the repository in its original collection.</em></font></p>Session presented on Saturday, April 9, 2016, and Friday, April 8, 2016: Problem: Burnout has been shown to be problematic for those who care for patients with mental illness. Studies have shown that between 21 to 67 % of mental health providers have indicated high levels of burnout. It is important for mental health professionals to understand the symptoms associated with burnout; however, few studies have addressed primary mental health provider burnout. Little is known with regard to factors that influence Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP) burnout. PMHNPs are playing a an ever increasing role in behavioral health care in the United States, thus providing individuals that otherwise would not receive specialized care with much needed mental health services with the Department of Human Services Division of Mental Health Services, the Advanced Practice Nurse Initiative implemented recruitment of psychiatric nurse practitioners to fill the void. Thus increasing access to care for individuals suffering from psychiatric conditions primarily in outpatient behavioral health settings, serving over 3,000 individuals, including medication management and psychotherapy. Therefore, it is important to address provider burnout in this population to promote staff retention and quality care. EBP Questions: What is the level of burnout in PMHNPs? What are the factors contributing to burnout in PMHNPs? Is there a significant difference in the levels of burnout between acute/inpatient PMHNPs and outpatient PMHNPs?  Is there a significant difference in components of burnout between exhaustion, depersonalization, lack of feeling accomplished, job resources, job performance, and personal resources and components between acute/inpatient PMHNPs and outpatient PMHNPs? Methods: This study utilizes a casual comparative design to examine group differences in burnout between 50 PMHNPs working in acute/inpatient and 50 PMHNs working in outpatient behavioral health. A database of Nurse Practitioners will be implemented to locate participants to complete An anonymous, one time online self-report survey comprised of several questionnaires. Analyses include descriptive statistics, Independent sample t-tests to identify and compare differences in the levels of burnout and components of burnout amongst two groups of PMHNPS those working in acute and PMHNPs working in non-acute settings. Outcomes: Differences in levels of burnout and components of burnout between PMHNPs working in acute/inpatient and outpatient settings will be determined by The Maslach Burnout Inventory and Areas of Worklife questionnaire. Significance: This study will examine PMHNP burnout, a phenomenon that has not yet been explored in this group. With this knowledge, employers, policy makers, and practitioners can develop strategies to reduce burnout and improve job satisfaction, retention rates, and quality of life for PMHNPs.en
dc.subjectBurnouten
dc.subjectValuesen
dc.subjectDepersonalizationen
dc.date.available2016-03-29T13:09:21Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-29en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-29T13:09:21Zen
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2016en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, and National League for Nursingen
dc.conference.locationWashington, DCen
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference Theme: Research as a Catalyst for Transformative Practiceen
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