Developing Nursing Student's Critical Thinking Ability Through Concept Mapping

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/603777
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Poster
Title:
Developing Nursing Student's Critical Thinking Ability Through Concept Mapping
Author(s):
Perry, Julie A.; Panepinto, Robingale A.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Iota
Author Details:
Julie A. Perry, RN, julie.perry@vanderbilt.edu; Robingale A. Panepinto, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, April 9, 2016, and Friday, April 8, 2016: Nursing concept mapping is a model that allows for organization of client problems and provides connections between the problems that is physically drawn to show the student’s knowledge of the connection (Gerdeman, J.L., Lux, K., & Jacko, J., 2013).  Concept mapping development was piloted in our fundamental clinical to help students develop an overall picture of their client and their situation.  Student and instructor feedback was acknowledged and utilized in development of the process and later implemented in all clinical rotations.  Fluidity in client care is captured within the development of the concept mapping process.  During the clinical experience students start prioritizing the major problem, but are able to visualize all the other problems and how they interact and influence the direction of care the student needs to take.  Students utilize critical thinking to see how all the mapping components play a role in the priority problem.  This process allowed for engagement of their critical thinking skills and in a clinical setting put it into practice to facilitate care of the client.  The five phases of the nursing process of assessment, diagnosis, planning, implementation, and evaluation are highly utilized in how the student approaches the development of the concept map (NANDA International, n.d.).  Clinical judgement, observation, specific outcome criteria, interventions, and review of current progress and potential intervention revisions are all aspects leading to the students focusing on the well-being and individualized care of the client.  During the clinical day, the initiates categorizing of the client priorities by asking the student “What is your priority problem”?, prompting the student to initiate critical thinking skills.  This allows the student to demonstrate and verbalize their thought process following the initial assessment phase to then determine the patient’s priority problem.  Instructors guide the student through prioritizing by asking related client questions.  During post conference, facilitated by the clinical instructor, students engage as a group in discussion regarding individual student client concept maps for alternative interventions, outcomes, and agreement on the priority problem. As students reflect on care provided for the client they determine alternative goals and modifications to interventions.  Through reflective activities and student, faculty, and clinical site feedback, outcome evaluation of the student’s critical thinking, through the use of concept mapping was found to be enhanced as students progressed through the nursing program.
Keywords:
concept mapping; critical thinking; student learning
Repository Posting Date:
29-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
29-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
NERC16PST63
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2016
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, and National League for Nursing
Conference Location:
Washington, DC
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference Theme: Research as a Catalyst for Transformative Practice

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleDeveloping Nursing Student's Critical Thinking Ability Through Concept Mappingen
dc.contributor.authorPerry, Julie A.en
dc.contributor.authorPanepinto, Robingale A.en
dc.contributor.departmentIotaen
dc.author.detailsJulie A. Perry, RN, julie.perry@vanderbilt.edu; Robingale A. Panepinto, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/603777en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, April 9, 2016, and Friday, April 8, 2016: Nursing concept mapping is a model that allows for organization of client problems and provides connections between the problems that is physically drawn to show the student’s knowledge of the connection (Gerdeman, J.L., Lux, K., & Jacko, J., 2013).  Concept mapping development was piloted in our fundamental clinical to help students develop an overall picture of their client and their situation.  Student and instructor feedback was acknowledged and utilized in development of the process and later implemented in all clinical rotations.  Fluidity in client care is captured within the development of the concept mapping process.  During the clinical experience students start prioritizing the major problem, but are able to visualize all the other problems and how they interact and influence the direction of care the student needs to take.  Students utilize critical thinking to see how all the mapping components play a role in the priority problem.  This process allowed for engagement of their critical thinking skills and in a clinical setting put it into practice to facilitate care of the client.  The five phases of the nursing process of assessment, diagnosis, planning, implementation, and evaluation are highly utilized in how the student approaches the development of the concept map (NANDA International, n.d.).  Clinical judgement, observation, specific outcome criteria, interventions, and review of current progress and potential intervention revisions are all aspects leading to the students focusing on the well-being and individualized care of the client.  During the clinical day, the initiates categorizing of the client priorities by asking the student “What is your priority problem”?, prompting the student to initiate critical thinking skills.  This allows the student to demonstrate and verbalize their thought process following the initial assessment phase to then determine the patient’s priority problem.  Instructors guide the student through prioritizing by asking related client questions.  During post conference, facilitated by the clinical instructor, students engage as a group in discussion regarding individual student client concept maps for alternative interventions, outcomes, and agreement on the priority problem. As students reflect on care provided for the client they determine alternative goals and modifications to interventions.  Through reflective activities and student, faculty, and clinical site feedback, outcome evaluation of the student’s critical thinking, through the use of concept mapping was found to be enhanced as students progressed through the nursing program.en
dc.subjectconcept mappingen
dc.subjectcritical thinkingen
dc.subjectstudent learningen
dc.date.available2016-03-29T13:09:36Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-29en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-29T13:09:36Zen
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2016en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, and National League for Nursingen
dc.conference.locationWashington, DCen
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference Theme: Research as a Catalyst for Transformative Practiceen
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