Methods for the Development and Validation of New Assessment Instruments

10.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/603778
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Methods for the Development and Validation of New Assessment Instruments
Other Titles:
Selection and Development of Tools [Session]
Author(s):
Jimenez, Francisco; Kleinheksel, A. J.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Francisco Jimenez, Psychologist, francisco@shadowhealth.com; A. J. Kleinheksel, Med
Abstract:
Session presented on Friday, April 8, 2016: INTRODUCTION Clinical reasoning is the non-linear analytical process of making decisions for the prevention, diagnosis, or treatment of problems facing a particular patient (Forsberg, Georg, Ziegert, & Fors, 2011; Shellenbarger & Robb, 2015). Nursing faculty often use virtual patients to assess their students’ clinical reasoning abilities. Cook and Triola (2009) identified clinical reasoning as the only valid learning objective for a virtual patient simulation, yet they also found that most assessment instruments within virtual patient programs employed an algorithmic approach, scoring the completeness of information elicited, instead of the cognitive process of clinical reasoning. At the time of this study, there were still no valid and reliable instruments designed to evaluate clinical reasoning in a virtual patient program. METHODS To measure the higher order thinking skill of clinical reasoning within a virtual patient program, the researchers first developed a conceptual framework of clinical reasoning within a virtual environment, then validated it with a group of subject matter experts in the field clinical reasoning. After the conceptual framework was validated, discrete components of the clinical reasoning framework were identified as areas for student assessment. Instruments were developed to measure these discrete components of clinical reasoning for BSN, RN-BSN, and MSN students in parallel, to control for differences in the learning populations. RESULTS A conceptual framework for clinical reasoning within a virtual patient simulation was constructed and content validated with a group of experts in clinical reasoning. Assessment instruments were developed to measure three components of clinical reasoning within the framework: data collection, therapeutic communication, and information processing. Each instrument was examined for evidence of internal consistency reliability and validity for BSN, RN-BSN, and MSN populations. All items showed high quality, and the instruments showed evidence of reliability and validity for each population. CONCLUSION Attendees of this presentation will understand the development and validation process involved in identifying a new conceptual framework, as well as the methods used to develop valid and reliable assessment instruments to measure their conceptual framework.
Keywords:
Assessment; Instrument development; Conceptual framework
Repository Posting Date:
29-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
29-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
NERC16C03
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2016
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, and National League for Nursing
Conference Location:
Washington, DC
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference Theme: Research as a Catalyst for Transformative Practice

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleMethods for the Development and Validation of New Assessment Instrumentsen
dc.title.alternativeSelection and Development of Tools [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorJimenez, Franciscoen
dc.contributor.authorKleinheksel, A. J.en
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsFrancisco Jimenez, Psychologist, francisco@shadowhealth.com; A. J. Kleinheksel, Meden
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/603778en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Friday, April 8, 2016: INTRODUCTION Clinical reasoning is the non-linear analytical process of making decisions for the prevention, diagnosis, or treatment of problems facing a particular patient (Forsberg, Georg, Ziegert, & Fors, 2011; Shellenbarger & Robb, 2015). Nursing faculty often use virtual patients to assess their students’ clinical reasoning abilities. Cook and Triola (2009) identified clinical reasoning as the only valid learning objective for a virtual patient simulation, yet they also found that most assessment instruments within virtual patient programs employed an algorithmic approach, scoring the completeness of information elicited, instead of the cognitive process of clinical reasoning. At the time of this study, there were still no valid and reliable instruments designed to evaluate clinical reasoning in a virtual patient program. METHODS To measure the higher order thinking skill of clinical reasoning within a virtual patient program, the researchers first developed a conceptual framework of clinical reasoning within a virtual environment, then validated it with a group of subject matter experts in the field clinical reasoning. After the conceptual framework was validated, discrete components of the clinical reasoning framework were identified as areas for student assessment. Instruments were developed to measure these discrete components of clinical reasoning for BSN, RN-BSN, and MSN students in parallel, to control for differences in the learning populations. RESULTS A conceptual framework for clinical reasoning within a virtual patient simulation was constructed and content validated with a group of experts in clinical reasoning. Assessment instruments were developed to measure three components of clinical reasoning within the framework: data collection, therapeutic communication, and information processing. Each instrument was examined for evidence of internal consistency reliability and validity for BSN, RN-BSN, and MSN populations. All items showed high quality, and the instruments showed evidence of reliability and validity for each population. CONCLUSION Attendees of this presentation will understand the development and validation process involved in identifying a new conceptual framework, as well as the methods used to develop valid and reliable assessment instruments to measure their conceptual framework.en
dc.subjectAssessmenten
dc.subjectInstrument developmenten
dc.subjectConceptual frameworken
dc.date.available2016-03-29T13:09:37Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-29en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-29T13:09:37Zen
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2016en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, and National League for Nursingen
dc.conference.locationWashington, DCen
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference Theme: Research as a Catalyst for Transformative Practiceen
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