2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/603779
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Authentic Learning: A Concept Analysis
Other Titles:
Real-World Teaching Through Simulation and Authentic Learning [Session]
Author(s):
Ndawo, Gugu
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Chi Xi
Author Details:
Gugu Ndawo, RN, RM, RCN, RPN, RCCN, gugun@uj.ac.za
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, April 9, 2016: Higher education is generally characterised by decontextualised and abstract teaching that do not engage learners in authentic learning. Failure to engage learner nurses in authentic learning leads learners to acquire superficial atomistic learning. This type of instructivistic teaching ignores the integration of theory to practice, and such ignorance makes it difficult for learner nurses to retrieve and use the knowledge when it is needed in real-life contexts. Superficial learning leads to solid, rigid and contextualised knowledge, hence failure to solve problems and make rational decisions in real-life situations. Although authentic learning can be viewed as simple, its meaning is broad and complex rendering this concept abstract and ambiguous (Cua, Shantapriyan & Rayeva, 2013). The concept analysis of authentic learning was done in order to fully understand the meaning and interpretation of authentic learning. The researcher addressed the research question that was: What is the meaning of authentic learning within the context of nursing education? This paper seeks to explore and describe the conceptual meaning of authentic learning within the context of nursing education using the method of concept analysis as described by Walker and Avant (2011:157-176). The concept analysis of authentic learning constitutes the first phase of a doctoral study to develop a model to facilitate authentic learning in learner nurses at a higher education institution in Gauteng. Therefore, the concept analysis ensures the theoretical validity of the study model. An extensive examination of dictionaries, thesauri, encyclopaedias, conference papers, research reports, recent journal articles, and subject-related books was explored through the use of databases from the library and internet searches.  The purpose of this intense exploration was to identify as many definitions and uses of authentic learning as possible in order to describe authentic learning within the context of nursing education. Through the processes of concept analysis, concept synthesis and concept derivation, the similarities and variations in the use and interpretation of authentic learning within the context of nursing education were drawn from the available literature. Through deductive reasoning and drawing of inferences, the defining attributes, three categories and related connotations were identified.   The results of the concept analysis of authentic learning within the context of nursing education included the following components: Antecedents (Cognitive and Affective thinking skills). Process (The three phases of the authentic learning) and the Outcome (A competent, critical, autonomous, independent life-long graduate desirable for the 21st century global healthcare system). Authentic learning was considered as a cyclic learning approach to intentional real-life meaningful learning since nursing practice takes place in the fluid and dynamic healthcare environment. It is also recommended that a model to facilitate authentic learning in learner nurses be developed based on the results of this concept analysis.
Keywords:
Authentic learning; Concept analysis; Defining attributes
Repository Posting Date:
29-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
29-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
NERC16E03
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2016
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, and National League for Nursing
Conference Location:
Washington, DC
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference Theme: Research as a Catalyst for Transformative Practice

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleAuthentic Learning: A Concept Analysisen
dc.title.alternativeReal-World Teaching Through Simulation and Authentic Learning [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorNdawo, Guguen
dc.contributor.departmentChi Xien
dc.author.detailsGugu Ndawo, RN, RM, RCN, RPN, RCCN, gugun@uj.ac.zaen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/603779en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, April 9, 2016: Higher education is generally characterised by decontextualised and abstract teaching that do not engage learners in authentic learning. Failure to engage learner nurses in authentic learning leads learners to acquire superficial atomistic learning. This type of instructivistic teaching ignores the integration of theory to practice, and such ignorance makes it difficult for learner nurses to retrieve and use the knowledge when it is needed in real-life contexts. Superficial learning leads to solid, rigid and contextualised knowledge, hence failure to solve problems and make rational decisions in real-life situations. Although authentic learning can be viewed as simple, its meaning is broad and complex rendering this concept abstract and ambiguous (Cua, Shantapriyan & Rayeva, 2013). The concept analysis of authentic learning was done in order to fully understand the meaning and interpretation of authentic learning. The researcher addressed the research question that was: What is the meaning of authentic learning within the context of nursing education? This paper seeks to explore and describe the conceptual meaning of authentic learning within the context of nursing education using the method of concept analysis as described by Walker and Avant (2011:157-176). The concept analysis of authentic learning constitutes the first phase of a doctoral study to develop a model to facilitate authentic learning in learner nurses at a higher education institution in Gauteng. Therefore, the concept analysis ensures the theoretical validity of the study model. An extensive examination of dictionaries, thesauri, encyclopaedias, conference papers, research reports, recent journal articles, and subject-related books was explored through the use of databases from the library and internet searches.  The purpose of this intense exploration was to identify as many definitions and uses of authentic learning as possible in order to describe authentic learning within the context of nursing education. Through the processes of concept analysis, concept synthesis and concept derivation, the similarities and variations in the use and interpretation of authentic learning within the context of nursing education were drawn from the available literature. Through deductive reasoning and drawing of inferences, the defining attributes, three categories and related connotations were identified.   The results of the concept analysis of authentic learning within the context of nursing education included the following components: Antecedents (Cognitive and Affective thinking skills). Process (The three phases of the authentic learning) and the Outcome (A competent, critical, autonomous, independent life-long graduate desirable for the 21st century global healthcare system). Authentic learning was considered as a cyclic learning approach to intentional real-life meaningful learning since nursing practice takes place in the fluid and dynamic healthcare environment. It is also recommended that a model to facilitate authentic learning in learner nurses be developed based on the results of this concept analysis.en
dc.subjectAuthentic learningen
dc.subjectConcept analysisen
dc.subjectDefining attributesen
dc.date.available2016-03-29T13:09:39Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-29en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-29T13:09:39Zen
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2016en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, and National League for Nursingen
dc.conference.locationWashington, DCen
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference Theme: Research as a Catalyst for Transformative Practiceen
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