International Immersion Experience Impact on Nurse Practitioner and Medical Students Readiness for Interprofessional Education

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/603799
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
International Immersion Experience Impact on Nurse Practitioner and Medical Students Readiness for Interprofessional Education
Other Titles:
Immersion Experience [Session]
Author(s):
Kosko, Debra A.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Phi Epsilon
Author Details:
Debra A. Kosko, RN, FNP
Abstract:
Session presented on Friday, April 8, 2016: Background: Fragmentation of care and poor communication between healthcare professions contributes to poor quality, high cost healthcare, while care delivered by well-functioning team�s decreases costs and improves clinical outcomes.�Health professions students are educated in silos which are a source of fragmented care.�Educating health professions students about team-based care and how to work with other health professionals, known as Interprofessional Education (IPE), provides them the necessary skills to transform our healthcare delivery system.�Therefore, educational models that successfully teach interprofessional core competencies to our health professions students are needed. Objective: The purpose of this project was to evaluate the impact of a 2 week interprofessional study abroad program on health professions student�s readiness for interprofessional education (IPE).�� Methods: This outcome-based summative program evaluation had a convenience sample of four family nurse practitioner (FNP) students and seven medical students.�The education model was a two week immersion study abroad in Nicaragua where students provided patient care in FNP/medical student teams in a variety of clinical settings.�The students attended debrief sessions throughout the experience that included discussions about IPE.�Everyone stayed at the same hotel, ate meals together and shared free time.�The Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS) was administered before departure to Nicaragua, immediately upon returning from Nicaragua and 2 months post-intervention.�Results: Three of the four RIPLS sub-scales; teamwork and collaboration, negative professional identity, positive professional identity, all had internal consistency reliabilities exceeding 0.90.�Pre-intervention mean subscale scores exceeded 4.3 out of a maximum 5.0, indicating a strong ceiling effect.�These high mean scores dipped slightly, never below 4.0, at post-intervention.�Mean scores 2 months later rebounded and were greater than 4.5 for all three subscales.�Conclusions: Although RIPLS was a reliable instrument for this program evaluation, the high pre-intervention scores made it difficult to evaluate substantial change between pre-intervention and post-intervention.�The interprofessional educational program may have produced important changes, but the RIPLS could not detect these changes because of the high pre-intervention ceiling effect.�More research in the area of IPE, particularly in the development of valid and reliable instruments, is needed in order to create interprofessional education models that can transform clinical practice.�The implication of study abroad models of education can also serve to promote interprofessional clinical practice globally.
Keywords:
interprofessional education; core competencies; transform healthcare
Repository Posting Date:
29-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
29-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
NERC16A03
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2016
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, and National League for Nursing
Conference Location:
Washington, DC
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference Theme: Research as a Catalyst for Transformative Practice

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleInternational Immersion Experience Impact on Nurse Practitioner and Medical Students Readiness for Interprofessional Educationen
dc.title.alternativeImmersion Experience [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorKosko, Debra A.en
dc.contributor.departmentPhi Epsilonen
dc.author.detailsDebra A. Kosko, RN, FNPen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/603799en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Friday, April 8, 2016: Background: Fragmentation of care and poor communication between healthcare professions contributes to poor quality, high cost healthcare, while care delivered by well-functioning team�s decreases costs and improves clinical outcomes.�Health professions students are educated in silos which are a source of fragmented care.�Educating health professions students about team-based care and how to work with other health professionals, known as Interprofessional Education (IPE), provides them the necessary skills to transform our healthcare delivery system.�Therefore, educational models that successfully teach interprofessional core competencies to our health professions students are needed. Objective: The purpose of this project was to evaluate the impact of a 2 week interprofessional study abroad program on health professions student�s readiness for interprofessional education (IPE).�� Methods: This outcome-based summative program evaluation had a convenience sample of four family nurse practitioner (FNP) students and seven medical students.�The education model was a two week immersion study abroad in Nicaragua where students provided patient care in FNP/medical student teams in a variety of clinical settings.�The students attended debrief sessions throughout the experience that included discussions about IPE.�Everyone stayed at the same hotel, ate meals together and shared free time.�The Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS) was administered before departure to Nicaragua, immediately upon returning from Nicaragua and 2 months post-intervention.�Results: Three of the four RIPLS sub-scales; teamwork and collaboration, negative professional identity, positive professional identity, all had internal consistency reliabilities exceeding 0.90.�Pre-intervention mean subscale scores exceeded 4.3 out of a maximum 5.0, indicating a strong ceiling effect.�These high mean scores dipped slightly, never below 4.0, at post-intervention.�Mean scores 2 months later rebounded and were greater than 4.5 for all three subscales.�Conclusions: Although RIPLS was a reliable instrument for this program evaluation, the high pre-intervention scores made it difficult to evaluate substantial change between pre-intervention and post-intervention.�The interprofessional educational program may have produced important changes, but the RIPLS could not detect these changes because of the high pre-intervention ceiling effect.�More research in the area of IPE, particularly in the development of valid and reliable instruments, is needed in order to create interprofessional education models that can transform clinical practice.�The implication of study abroad models of education can also serve to promote interprofessional clinical practice globally.en
dc.subjectinterprofessional educationen
dc.subjectcore competenciesen
dc.subjecttransform healthcareen
dc.date.available2016-03-29T13:10:07Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-29en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-29T13:10:07Zen
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2016en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, and National League for Nursingen
dc.conference.locationWashington, DCen
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference Theme: Research as a Catalyst for Transformative Practiceen
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