Adult Learners Formulate Creative Pediatric Clinical Assignments With Real World Application

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/603804
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Poster
Title:
Adult Learners Formulate Creative Pediatric Clinical Assignments With Real World Application
Author(s):
House Maffett, Jenny; Piras, Sue E.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Xi
Author Details:
Jenny House Maffett, RN, jmaffett@tntech.edu; Sue E. Piras, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, April 9, 2016, and Friday, April 8, 2016: The purpose of this presentation is to assess the effects of problem-based learning activities targeting the adult learner.  This project was developed to supplement a pediatric clinical experience for nursing students enrolled in an accelerated BSN program located in the southeast United States. Linked with their pediatric didactic course, the student’s pediatric clinical experience required the completion of ninety clinical contact hours over the span of one month. Freedom to self-schedule certain clinical components allowed for time management challenges between the students’ personal and degree-required experiences. To address this time management challenge, two open-ended, problem-based learning assignments with stated course objectives and outcomes were introduced during the pediatric clinical orientation. Target dates for in-class or online discussion/feedback coupled with the student flexibility to self-schedule small group or individual work sessions in order to complete these given assignments were presented as well.  The first problem-based assignment was to create a four-hour recreational activity for a local public housing’s summer session series targeting kindergarten through sixth grade students. Requirements for this activity directed the students to develop an age appropriate health educational activity.  This assignment culminated in the class conducting the recreational activity with the target population on a given date. The second assignment was for the class to develop a case study from an initial narrative scenario about a single mother who was living with her boyfriend, the father of her most recent child, as well as two children from a previous marriage. The mother received welfare and state subsidies while staying at home to care for her children. The boyfriend had a steady job, as a truck driver but was away from home much of the time. Results from this assignment would be utilized in the future by our traditional BSN classes as a comparable pediatric learning experience in the event of student group’s missed clinical time. Accelerated students were given the opportunity to draw on their past experiences and create two activities with real-life application while meeting specific clinical course objectives. These pediatric clinical learning experiences targeted the adult learner nursing students.  Adult learning, as described by Knowles’ Theory of Andragogy, is “the art and science of helping adults learn” (Knowles, 1990, p. 53).  In contrast to pedagogy, the premise of andragogy lies in the understanding that adult education is focused more on process than content.  This process is more learner-centered than teacher-centered.  Malcolm Knowles, the “father of andragogy,” specifies six assumptions for successful adult learning transactions: (1) Emergence of a self-concept of self-directedness, (2) Contribution of adult learners’ past life experiences, (3) Readiness to learn for real-life situations, (4) Problem-based learning, (5) Need to know, and (6) Motivation (Knowles et al., 2005).  Our case study and age appropriate health educational activity target the assumption of self-directedness, contribution of past life experiences, readiness to learn for real-life situations, and problem-based learning. A survey was administered to the students upon course completion.  This survey assessed their perceptions toward the effectiveness of the learning techniques employed throughout the semester.  The survey tool, Monson, 2005, was administered to the students to assess the effectiveness of the learning activities. Our teaching team modified this survey tool to include the two active learning activities implemented in the pediatric clinical course.  The open-ended questions were also reworded to reflect the active learning projects our students had undertaken. Survey result data will be analyzed with results helping to shape future experiences for the adult learner in this pediatric clinical expereince.
Keywords:
Andragogy; Learning strategies; Problem-based learning
Repository Posting Date:
29-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
29-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
NERC16PST39
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2016
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, and National League for Nursing
Conference Location:
Washington, DC
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference Theme: Research as a Catalyst for Transformative Practice

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleAdult Learners Formulate Creative Pediatric Clinical Assignments With Real World Applicationen
dc.contributor.authorHouse Maffett, Jennyen
dc.contributor.authorPiras, Sue E.en
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Xien
dc.author.detailsJenny House Maffett, RN, jmaffett@tntech.edu; Sue E. Piras, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/603804en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, April 9, 2016, and Friday, April 8, 2016: The purpose of this presentation is to assess the effects of problem-based learning activities targeting the adult learner.  This project was developed to supplement a pediatric clinical experience for nursing students enrolled in an accelerated BSN program located in the southeast United States. Linked with their pediatric didactic course, the student’s pediatric clinical experience required the completion of ninety clinical contact hours over the span of one month. Freedom to self-schedule certain clinical components allowed for time management challenges between the students’ personal and degree-required experiences. To address this time management challenge, two open-ended, problem-based learning assignments with stated course objectives and outcomes were introduced during the pediatric clinical orientation. Target dates for in-class or online discussion/feedback coupled with the student flexibility to self-schedule small group or individual work sessions in order to complete these given assignments were presented as well.  The first problem-based assignment was to create a four-hour recreational activity for a local public housing’s summer session series targeting kindergarten through sixth grade students. Requirements for this activity directed the students to develop an age appropriate health educational activity.  This assignment culminated in the class conducting the recreational activity with the target population on a given date. The second assignment was for the class to develop a case study from an initial narrative scenario about a single mother who was living with her boyfriend, the father of her most recent child, as well as two children from a previous marriage. The mother received welfare and state subsidies while staying at home to care for her children. The boyfriend had a steady job, as a truck driver but was away from home much of the time. Results from this assignment would be utilized in the future by our traditional BSN classes as a comparable pediatric learning experience in the event of student group’s missed clinical time. Accelerated students were given the opportunity to draw on their past experiences and create two activities with real-life application while meeting specific clinical course objectives. These pediatric clinical learning experiences targeted the adult learner nursing students.  Adult learning, as described by Knowles’ Theory of Andragogy, is “the art and science of helping adults learn” (Knowles, 1990, p. 53).  In contrast to pedagogy, the premise of andragogy lies in the understanding that adult education is focused more on process than content.  This process is more learner-centered than teacher-centered.  Malcolm Knowles, the “father of andragogy,” specifies six assumptions for successful adult learning transactions: (1) Emergence of a self-concept of self-directedness, (2) Contribution of adult learners’ past life experiences, (3) Readiness to learn for real-life situations, (4) Problem-based learning, (5) Need to know, and (6) Motivation (Knowles et al., 2005).  Our case study and age appropriate health educational activity target the assumption of self-directedness, contribution of past life experiences, readiness to learn for real-life situations, and problem-based learning. A survey was administered to the students upon course completion.  This survey assessed their perceptions toward the effectiveness of the learning techniques employed throughout the semester.  The survey tool, Monson, 2005, was administered to the students to assess the effectiveness of the learning activities. Our teaching team modified this survey tool to include the two active learning activities implemented in the pediatric clinical course.  The open-ended questions were also reworded to reflect the active learning projects our students had undertaken. Survey result data will be analyzed with results helping to shape future experiences for the adult learner in this pediatric clinical expereince.en
dc.subjectAndragogyen
dc.subjectLearning strategiesen
dc.subjectProblem-based learningen
dc.date.available2016-03-29T13:10:13Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-29en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-29T13:10:13Zen
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2016en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, and National League for Nursingen
dc.conference.locationWashington, DCen
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference Theme: Research as a Catalyst for Transformative Practiceen
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