2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/603813
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Poster
Title:
Self-Efficacy: Perspectives From Alternate Nursing Students
Author(s):
Swenson, Allison K.; Jensen, Francine B.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Allison K. Swenson, RN, allison.swenson@uvu.edu; Francine B. Jensen, RN
Abstract:

This item is part of a CNE course. The material is freely available in the Henderson Repository. The CNE course (and associated fee, if any) is not part of the Henderson Repository. To access the course please click on the applicable link on the CNE collection homepage: http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/620073. Note the start and end dates for the course. If the links to the CNE collection homepage or course are invalid, the course has ended. The item record and file will remain as a permanent entry in the repository in its original collection.

Session presented on Saturday, April 9, 2016, and Friday, April 8, 2016: The purpose of this qualitative research study is to consider how potential nursing students are affected by the processes used to gain admittance in to an associate degree nursing program.  Over the years, various admissions strategies have been utilized across the United States to admit students to nursing programs.  Many programs have traditionally admitted nursing students whose grade point averages in pre-requisite courses were superior.  On the other hand, some programs have augmented strictly statistical measures of acceptances with an interview process, in an attempt to broaden acceptance criteria beyond TEAS (Test of Essential Academic Skills) scores and grade point averages.  Whatever method is utilized to choose entrants, when students who are accepted into the program are unable to matriculate, vacant spaces are filled by those on a waiting lists.  Does being labeled an “alternate” have an effect on students who are then admitted into competitive nursing programs?  Exploring what this experience is like for students who are admitted from statuses as alternates, will enlighten the knowledge base about their experiences during nursing school. When students are labeled as alternates and ultimately admitted, their self-efficacy and pre-conceived notions in regards to their sense of belonging, strength of qualifications or perceived worthiness may be affected.   These students may often compare themselves to their peers in negative ways.  In addition, findings explore perceptions of being labeled “an alternate” that may linger beyond school into the self-efficacy of newly registered nurses.  The implications of this study may identify unknown biases that students perceive about their qualifications to be successful in both nursing school and potentially beyond into the workforce.  The findings from this study will be used to improve and guide the interview and admission processes for associate degree nursing programs.   This will also allow administrators to make a more conscious approach with students, beginning at the initial contact in a more purposeful and encouraging manner to foster self-efficacy for improved student success.
Keywords:
Alternate; Admission; Self-efficacy
Repository Posting Date:
29-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
29-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
NERC16PST76
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2016
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, and National League for Nursing
Conference Location:
Washington, DC
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference Theme: Research as a Catalyst for Transformative Practice

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleSelf-Efficacy: Perspectives From Alternate Nursing Studentsen
dc.contributor.authorSwenson, Allison K.en
dc.contributor.authorJensen, Francine B.en
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsAllison K. Swenson, RN, allison.swenson@uvu.edu; Francine B. Jensen, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/603813en
dc.description.abstract<p><font color="red"><em>This item is part of a CNE course. The material is freely available in the Henderson Repository. The CNE course (and associated fee, if any) is not part of the Henderson Repository. To access the course please click on the applicable link on the CNE collection homepage: <a href="http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/620073" target="_blank"> http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/620073</a>. Note the start and end dates for the course. If the links to the CNE collection homepage or course are invalid, the course has ended. The item record and file will remain as a permanent entry in the repository in its original collection.</em></font></p>Session presented on Saturday, April 9, 2016, and Friday, April 8, 2016: The purpose of this qualitative research study is to consider how potential nursing students are affected by the processes used to gain admittance in to an associate degree nursing program.  Over the years, various admissions strategies have been utilized across the United States to admit students to nursing programs.  Many programs have traditionally admitted nursing students whose grade point averages in pre-requisite courses were superior.  On the other hand, some programs have augmented strictly statistical measures of acceptances with an interview process, in an attempt to broaden acceptance criteria beyond TEAS (Test of Essential Academic Skills) scores and grade point averages.  Whatever method is utilized to choose entrants, when students who are accepted into the program are unable to matriculate, vacant spaces are filled by those on a waiting lists.  Does being labeled an “alternate” have an effect on students who are then admitted into competitive nursing programs?  Exploring what this experience is like for students who are admitted from statuses as alternates, will enlighten the knowledge base about their experiences during nursing school. When students are labeled as alternates and ultimately admitted, their self-efficacy and pre-conceived notions in regards to their sense of belonging, strength of qualifications or perceived worthiness may be affected.   These students may often compare themselves to their peers in negative ways.  In addition, findings explore perceptions of being labeled “an alternate” that may linger beyond school into the self-efficacy of newly registered nurses.  The implications of this study may identify unknown biases that students perceive about their qualifications to be successful in both nursing school and potentially beyond into the workforce.  The findings from this study will be used to improve and guide the interview and admission processes for associate degree nursing programs.   This will also allow administrators to make a more conscious approach with students, beginning at the initial contact in a more purposeful and encouraging manner to foster self-efficacy for improved student success.en
dc.subjectAlternateen
dc.subjectAdmissionen
dc.subjectSelf-efficacyen
dc.date.available2016-03-29T13:10:26Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-29en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-29T13:10:26Zen
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2016en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, and National League for Nursingen
dc.conference.locationWashington, DCen
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference Theme: Research as a Catalyst for Transformative Practiceen
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