Caring for Vulnerable Populations: Perspectives of Interprofessional Graduate Students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/603830
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Poster
Title:
Caring for Vulnerable Populations: Perspectives of Interprofessional Graduate Students
Author(s):
Moyle Wright, Patricia
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Theta Phi
Author Details:
Patricia Moyle Wright, RN, CRNP, ACNS-BC, CHPN, CNE, patricia.wright@scranton.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, April 9, 2016, and Friday, April 8, 2016: The purpose of this focus group study was to explore graduate students’ clinical experiences with vulnerable populations, perceived barriers to care, and ethical issues related to caring for disenfranchised groups. Further, based on their experiences, the students were asked to share suggestions for curricular changes that could enhance care for vulnerable populations through interdisciplinary collaboration and multidisciplinary projects. The responses of the participants add to what is known about the care of vulnerable populations, offering a first-hand description of students’ preparation for work with vulnerable population and the interdisciplinary team. The results of this study illustrate graduate students’ understanding of the competencies recommended by the Institute of Medicine. Participants viewed patients as part of a vulnerable population if they were unable to easily access health care and follow through with recommended treatments. Although the participants encountered many vulnerable groups during their clinical rotations, they sometimes felt unprepared to meet their multiple and complex needs from their own unique disciplinary perspectives. The participants recognized the value of interprofessional teamwork and education in the development of more holistic, patient-centered plans of care. Additionally, the participants offered their perspective on where gaps in their education could be addressed to help them more easily meet the needs of vulnerable populations. The participants noted that curricular changes within their graduate programs could better prepare them for interdisciplinary teamwork which could, in turn, positively change clinical practice. IP education has been identified as an important part of graduate education, but to date it has not been incorporated into many programs (Hanyok, Walton-Moss, Tanner, Stewart, & Becker, 2013). When placed in interprofessional learning environments, students can observe how others function and then identify how they can contribute to the work of the team from their own unique perspective (Thistlewaite, 2012). This type of educational preparation can lead to better collaboration among health care providers, which can improve clinical care, reduce health care costs, and improve job satisfaction (Bajnok, Puddester, MacDonald, Archibald, & Kuhl, 2012). More research is needed to determine whether the experiences of our students with vulnerable populations is common among graduate students. The suggestions for curricular enhancement may be useful to other educators seeking student perspectives on interdisciplinary education.
Keywords:
Interprofessional Education; Graduation Education; Vulnerable Populations
Repository Posting Date:
29-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
29-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
NERC16PST58
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2016
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, and National League for Nursing
Conference Location:
Washington, DC
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference Theme: Research as a Catalyst for Transformative Practice

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleCaring for Vulnerable Populations: Perspectives of Interprofessional Graduate Studentsen
dc.contributor.authorMoyle Wright, Patriciaen
dc.contributor.departmentTheta Phien
dc.author.detailsPatricia Moyle Wright, RN, CRNP, ACNS-BC, CHPN, CNE, patricia.wright@scranton.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/603830en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, April 9, 2016, and Friday, April 8, 2016: The purpose of this focus group study was to explore graduate students’ clinical experiences with vulnerable populations, perceived barriers to care, and ethical issues related to caring for disenfranchised groups. Further, based on their experiences, the students were asked to share suggestions for curricular changes that could enhance care for vulnerable populations through interdisciplinary collaboration and multidisciplinary projects. The responses of the participants add to what is known about the care of vulnerable populations, offering a first-hand description of students’ preparation for work with vulnerable population and the interdisciplinary team. The results of this study illustrate graduate students’ understanding of the competencies recommended by the Institute of Medicine. Participants viewed patients as part of a vulnerable population if they were unable to easily access health care and follow through with recommended treatments. Although the participants encountered many vulnerable groups during their clinical rotations, they sometimes felt unprepared to meet their multiple and complex needs from their own unique disciplinary perspectives. The participants recognized the value of interprofessional teamwork and education in the development of more holistic, patient-centered plans of care. Additionally, the participants offered their perspective on where gaps in their education could be addressed to help them more easily meet the needs of vulnerable populations. The participants noted that curricular changes within their graduate programs could better prepare them for interdisciplinary teamwork which could, in turn, positively change clinical practice. IP education has been identified as an important part of graduate education, but to date it has not been incorporated into many programs (Hanyok, Walton-Moss, Tanner, Stewart, & Becker, 2013). When placed in interprofessional learning environments, students can observe how others function and then identify how they can contribute to the work of the team from their own unique perspective (Thistlewaite, 2012). This type of educational preparation can lead to better collaboration among health care providers, which can improve clinical care, reduce health care costs, and improve job satisfaction (Bajnok, Puddester, MacDonald, Archibald, & Kuhl, 2012). More research is needed to determine whether the experiences of our students with vulnerable populations is common among graduate students. The suggestions for curricular enhancement may be useful to other educators seeking student perspectives on interdisciplinary education.en
dc.subjectInterprofessional Educationen
dc.subjectGraduation Educationen
dc.subjectVulnerable Populationsen
dc.date.available2016-03-29T13:10:46Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-29en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-29T13:10:46Zen
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2016en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, and National League for Nursingen
dc.conference.locationWashington, DCen
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference Theme: Research as a Catalyst for Transformative Practiceen
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