2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/603841
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Integrating Collaborative Learning in Nursing Education
Other Titles:
Promoting a Culture of Undergraduate Research Through Collaborative Learning [Symposium]
Author(s):
Falvo, Nancy C.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Mu Xi
Author Details:
Nancy C. Falvo, RN, nfalvo1@clarion.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Friday, April 8, 2016: Group work for students in an academic setting is often discouraging for both students and the instructor. Students complain that groups often include students who are not motivated to master a concept or assignment and/or students who do not possess the same skill set as other members of the group. Often a subset of the original group takes responsibility for completing the assignment allowing the remaining students to not participate as required or expected. Instructors are frequently called upon to govern the group when problems with participation occur and are asked to “force non-participating students” to do their share of the work. Collaborative in nursing education encourages students to take an active role in their learning. Evolving from social learning theories and constructivism, collaboratively learning can improve both the process and outcomes of learning in nursing education. When properly implemented, students become responsible for their learning as well as the learning of their group members. Strategies for positive collaborative learning include considering group size in light of the assignment, establishing basic rules for group participation, promoting group communication, maintaining an instructor presence that changes as the project evolves, use of the group charter for group governance, and incorporating appropriate technology to promote group process. Consideration should also be given to assessment methods for the group project from both the instructor and individual group members. Self-assessment promotes a more active ownership in the outcomes of the group. Critical thinking, leadership, and communication skill development is evident in collaborative learning teams.  Self-awareness of personal strengths and weaknesses become evident through open discussions with group members.  Students helping students better reflect the “real world” experiences. These experiences also transfers easily for the graduate nurse to the practice setting of working within a multi-disciplinary team. Examples from both online and face-to-face classrooms will be presented.
Keywords:
Collaborative learning; Undergraduate Nursing Education; Research
Repository Posting Date:
29-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
29-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
NERC16A01
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2016
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, and National League for Nursing
Conference Location:
Washington, DC
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference Theme: Research as a Catalyst for Transformative Practice

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleIntegrating Collaborative Learning in Nursing Educationen
dc.title.alternativePromoting a Culture of Undergraduate Research Through Collaborative Learning [Symposium]en
dc.contributor.authorFalvo, Nancy C.en
dc.contributor.departmentMu Xien
dc.author.detailsNancy C. Falvo, RN, nfalvo1@clarion.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/603841en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Friday, April 8, 2016: Group work for students in an academic setting is often discouraging for both students and the instructor. Students complain that groups often include students who are not motivated to master a concept or assignment and/or students who do not possess the same skill set as other members of the group. Often a subset of the original group takes responsibility for completing the assignment allowing the remaining students to not participate as required or expected. Instructors are frequently called upon to govern the group when problems with participation occur and are asked to “force non-participating students” to do their share of the work. Collaborative in nursing education encourages students to take an active role in their learning. Evolving from social learning theories and constructivism, collaboratively learning can improve both the process and outcomes of learning in nursing education. When properly implemented, students become responsible for their learning as well as the learning of their group members. Strategies for positive collaborative learning include considering group size in light of the assignment, establishing basic rules for group participation, promoting group communication, maintaining an instructor presence that changes as the project evolves, use of the group charter for group governance, and incorporating appropriate technology to promote group process. Consideration should also be given to assessment methods for the group project from both the instructor and individual group members. Self-assessment promotes a more active ownership in the outcomes of the group. Critical thinking, leadership, and communication skill development is evident in collaborative learning teams.  Self-awareness of personal strengths and weaknesses become evident through open discussions with group members.  Students helping students better reflect the “real world” experiences. These experiences also transfers easily for the graduate nurse to the practice setting of working within a multi-disciplinary team. Examples from both online and face-to-face classrooms will be presented.en
dc.subjectCollaborative learningen
dc.subjectUndergraduate Nursing Educationen
dc.subjectResearchen
dc.date.available2016-03-29T13:10:59Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-29en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-29T13:10:59Zen
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2016en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, and National League for Nursingen
dc.conference.locationWashington, DCen
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference Theme: Research as a Catalyst for Transformative Practiceen
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