Leaders Among Us: Leadership Appraisal of Baccalaureate Nursing Students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/603849
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Poster
Title:
Leaders Among Us: Leadership Appraisal of Baccalaureate Nursing Students
Author(s):
Kaylor, Sara K.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Epsilon Omega
Author Details:
Sara K. Kaylor, RN, CNE, skkaylor@ua.edu
Abstract:

This item is part of a CNE course. The material is freely available in the Henderson Repository. The CNE course (and associated fee, if any) is not part of the Henderson Repository. To access the course please click on the applicable link on the CNE collection homepage: http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/620073. Note the start and end dates for the course. If the links to the CNE collection homepage or course are invalid, the course has ended. The item record and file will remain as a permanent entry in the repository in its original collection.

Session presented on Saturday, April 9, 2016, and Friday, April 8, 2016: In today’s fast-paced and technology-driven health care settings, the need for nurse leaders remains a critical demand. Stemming in part because of the Affordable Care Act, health care institutions now face multiple leadership challenges, such as reductions in full-time registered nursing positions, decreased job satisfaction among staff, increased turnover rates, fragmentation of health care team relationships, and negative effects on nurses’ physical and psychological well-being (Miskelly & Duncan, 2014; Yost, 2014). In an effort to combat such challenges while also striving to provide the best quality care to patients, nurses frequently find themselves serving in formal leadership roles without actual formal leadership training (Kerfoot, 2008; Yost, 2014). Instead, an expectation exists for nurses to learn quickly leadership skills, often through trial-and-error experiences, which at times can equate to failure for new nurse leaders (Swearingen, 2009). Not all nurses begin their career with thoughts of becoming a leader yet many find themselves serving in leadership roles without much formalized planning or preparation. The development of such competency and skill is not something that can be taught in a single, one-time occurrence, but rather are abilities that ebb and flow through an ongoing basis, often though practice and successful experience of leading one’s self, others, and organizations (Yost, 2014). Several postgraduate courses do exist that pertain to the development of leadership and management skills, however it is noted that most of these programs target nurses who already hold management or leadership positions (Miskelly & Duncan, 2014). The purpose of this study is to assess a baseline level of leadership competency and skill of students enrolled in a traditional baccalaureate nursing program, and to determine if that baseline level is affected over time by students’ clinical experiences. An understanding of these findings may assist nurse educators in determining if a need exists for more formalized leadership training at the undergraduate level.
Keywords:
Leadership; Baccalaureate Education; Quantitative Research
Repository Posting Date:
29-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
29-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
NERC16PST47
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2016
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, and National League for Nursing
Conference Location:
Washington, DC
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference Theme: Research as a Catalyst for Transformative Practice

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleLeaders Among Us: Leadership Appraisal of Baccalaureate Nursing Studentsen
dc.contributor.authorKaylor, Sara K.en
dc.contributor.departmentEpsilon Omegaen
dc.author.detailsSara K. Kaylor, RN, CNE, skkaylor@ua.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/603849en
dc.description.abstract<p><font color="red"><em>This item is part of a CNE course. The material is freely available in the Henderson Repository. The CNE course (and associated fee, if any) is not part of the Henderson Repository. To access the course please click on the applicable link on the CNE collection homepage: <a href="http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/620073" target="_blank"> http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/620073</a>. Note the start and end dates for the course. If the links to the CNE collection homepage or course are invalid, the course has ended. The item record and file will remain as a permanent entry in the repository in its original collection.</em></font></p> Session presented on Saturday, April 9, 2016, and Friday, April 8, 2016: In today’s fast-paced and technology-driven health care settings, the need for nurse leaders remains a critical demand. Stemming in part because of the Affordable Care Act, health care institutions now face multiple leadership challenges, such as reductions in full-time registered nursing positions, decreased job satisfaction among staff, increased turnover rates, fragmentation of health care team relationships, and negative effects on nurses’ physical and psychological well-being (Miskelly & Duncan, 2014; Yost, 2014). In an effort to combat such challenges while also striving to provide the best quality care to patients, nurses frequently find themselves serving in formal leadership roles without actual formal leadership training (Kerfoot, 2008; Yost, 2014). Instead, an expectation exists for nurses to learn quickly leadership skills, often through trial-and-error experiences, which at times can equate to failure for new nurse leaders (Swearingen, 2009). Not all nurses begin their career with thoughts of becoming a leader yet many find themselves serving in leadership roles without much formalized planning or preparation. The development of such competency and skill is not something that can be taught in a single, one-time occurrence, but rather are abilities that ebb and flow through an ongoing basis, often though practice and successful experience of leading one’s self, others, and organizations (Yost, 2014). Several postgraduate courses do exist that pertain to the development of leadership and management skills, however it is noted that most of these programs target nurses who already hold management or leadership positions (Miskelly & Duncan, 2014). The purpose of this study is to assess a baseline level of leadership competency and skill of students enrolled in a traditional baccalaureate nursing program, and to determine if that baseline level is affected over time by students’ clinical experiences. An understanding of these findings may assist nurse educators in determining if a need exists for more formalized leadership training at the undergraduate level.en
dc.subjectLeadershipen
dc.subjectBaccalaureate Educationen
dc.subjectQuantitative Researchen
dc.date.available2016-03-29T13:11:08Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-29en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-29T13:11:08Zen
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2016en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, and National League for Nursingen
dc.conference.locationWashington, DCen
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference Theme: Research as a Catalyst for Transformative Practiceen
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