Discourse in Ways of Knowing and Engagement: Advancing Nursing Knowledge in Online Environments

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/603856
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Discourse in Ways of Knowing and Engagement: Advancing Nursing Knowledge in Online Environments
Other Titles:
Technology in the Classroom [Session]
Author(s):
Bankert, Esther G.; Dusaj, Tresa Kaur; Madison, Holly Evans; Cannistraci, Patricia
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Iota Delta
Author Details:
Esther G. Bankert, RN, ebankert@excelsior.edu; Tresa Kaur Dusaj, RN-BC, CNE, CHSE, CTN-A; Holly Evans Madison, RN; Patricia Cannistraci, RN, CNE
Abstract:
Session presented on Friday, April 8, 2016: Historically, online discussions were typically designed around course topics or case studies to elicit student participation within academic learning environments. Early discussions were encouraged to afford students ample time to read peer comments before responding to a set number of posts as directed by the faculty facilitator. Evaluations of online participation were rated according to documented sources to support substantial posts early in the week and in meeting a required number of responses to peer’s posts later in the week. However, as seen with adult learners mid-week posts and responses to peers were not always feasible due to family and work commitments. Students consistently reported on course evaluations that these limitations and subsequent performance ratings hampered their participation and motivation to learn. The student grades were inflated as they focused on empirical evidence, APA format for references used to support student comments, and meeting required number of posts within designated timeframes. Anderson-Meger (2014), however, reports if students believe the knowledge is relevant and important to them, they will internalize learning and become motivated to build more knowledge rather than focusing on a grade. As a team of educators we recognized the need for promoting academic conversations that emphasized engagement with peers free from being stifled by arbitrary due dates. We also agreed there was a need to guide these conversations that promoted a deeper understanding of nursing practice and personal experiences and not solely based on empirical evidence. It was our intent that online discussions would  foster nursing knowledge development and promote the application of new learning as students evolve in their practice.  This presentation focuses on one teaching strategy that encourages a reflective discourse when engaged in online discussions. This new direction required students to have a social presence that conveys caring and forming connections (Watson & Smith, 2002); and moving beyond empirical evidence to include reflective dialogue related to personal experiences, opinions, and development of essential nursing knowledge as students progressed in their programs. Carpers’ (1978) seminal work on Four Ways of Knowing and Chinn and Kramer’s (2015) Knowledge Development provides the foundation and the structure for understanding nursing. Therefore, we proposed using patterns of knowing as a new way to guide student discussions into an academic discourse from different perspectives. Through the four Ways of Knowing, a new lens for discovering new nursing knowledge emerged.  Students were guided to focus discussions on uncovering personal knowing; developing new knowledge through shared nursing experiences; and reflecting upon and becoming aware of new ways to practice.  Framing online discussions into ways of knowing facilitated students dialogue with peers to gain a deeper understanding of what is nursing knowledge. Through their lens each student addressed the topic using personal knowing and experiences; empiric knowing as it supports or refutes nursing knowledge and current practices; ethical knowing and values clarification to develop moral reasoning; and discovering a new awareness of nursing experiences through personal AhHa moments of aesthetic knowing.  The new structure also provided the structure for a new rubric when evaluating participation. The criteria was designed to capture ways of knowing and engagement within the learning environment without restrictions to required numbers of posts or due dates for initial posts. One baccalaureate research course and one graduate leadership course were piloted for the initial implementation of this project. After revisiting outcomes with student and faculty input, the decision was made to begin using the new discussion with Ways of Knowing and Engagement across all nursing courses in the baccalaureate and graduate courses. As courses were revised cues were added to the discussion questions prompting different ways of knowing; participation rubrics included short descriptors to illustrate the four ways of knowing and social presence as criteria for evaluating participation.  Webinars for all adjunct faculty was provided and recorded sessions were added to the courses for faculty reference. Evaluations from students and faculty teaching the courses are confirming success regarding this change. Students report positive feedback when exploring topics and using Reflection and Ways of Knowing as a framework. Peer collaboration is evident and greater sense of community is also evolving with peers and faculty. Faculty report the new rubric design is easy to use as they encourage and evaluate student discourse and identify patterns of knowing in student’s dialogue. Faculty are also using prompts from the rubric to facilitate conversations and advance the dialogue as students deliberate and integrate nursing knowledge into their practice. With the implementation of this new strategy for online discussions, we are hopeful new ways of learning will continue to be actualized. References Anderson-Meger, J. (2014). Examining knowledge beliefs to motivate student learning. Faculty Focus, (July 21, 2014). Retrieved from http://www.facultyfocus.com/ Carper, B. A. (1978). Fundamental patterns of knowing in  nursing. ANS Advances in nursing Science, 1(1), 13-23. Chinn, P. L. & Kramer, M. K. (2015). Knowledge development in nursing: Theory and process (9thed.). St. Louis, MO: Elsevier. Watson, J. & Smith, M. (2002). Caring science and the science of unitary human beings: A trans-theoretical discourse for nursing knowledge development. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 37(5), 452-461.
Keywords:
Online Learning; Discussions; Rubric
Repository Posting Date:
29-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
29-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
NERC16C04
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2016
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, and National League for Nursing
Conference Location:
Washington, DC
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference Theme: Research as a Catalyst for Transformative Practice

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleDiscourse in Ways of Knowing and Engagement: Advancing Nursing Knowledge in Online Environmentsen
dc.title.alternativeTechnology in the Classroom [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorBankert, Esther G.en
dc.contributor.authorDusaj, Tresa Kauren
dc.contributor.authorMadison, Holly Evansen
dc.contributor.authorCannistraci, Patriciaen
dc.contributor.departmentIota Deltaen
dc.author.detailsEsther G. Bankert, RN, ebankert@excelsior.edu; Tresa Kaur Dusaj, RN-BC, CNE, CHSE, CTN-A; Holly Evans Madison, RN; Patricia Cannistraci, RN, CNEen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/603856en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Friday, April 8, 2016: Historically, online discussions were typically designed around course topics or case studies to elicit student participation within academic learning environments. Early discussions were encouraged to afford students ample time to read peer comments before responding to a set number of posts as directed by the faculty facilitator. Evaluations of online participation were rated according to documented sources to support substantial posts early in the week and in meeting a required number of responses to peer’s posts later in the week. However, as seen with adult learners mid-week posts and responses to peers were not always feasible due to family and work commitments. Students consistently reported on course evaluations that these limitations and subsequent performance ratings hampered their participation and motivation to learn. The student grades were inflated as they focused on empirical evidence, APA format for references used to support student comments, and meeting required number of posts within designated timeframes. Anderson-Meger (2014), however, reports if students believe the knowledge is relevant and important to them, they will internalize learning and become motivated to build more knowledge rather than focusing on a grade. As a team of educators we recognized the need for promoting academic conversations that emphasized engagement with peers free from being stifled by arbitrary due dates. We also agreed there was a need to guide these conversations that promoted a deeper understanding of nursing practice and personal experiences and not solely based on empirical evidence. It was our intent that online discussions would  foster nursing knowledge development and promote the application of new learning as students evolve in their practice.  This presentation focuses on one teaching strategy that encourages a reflective discourse when engaged in online discussions. This new direction required students to have a social presence that conveys caring and forming connections (Watson & Smith, 2002); and moving beyond empirical evidence to include reflective dialogue related to personal experiences, opinions, and development of essential nursing knowledge as students progressed in their programs. Carpers’ (1978) seminal work on Four Ways of Knowing and Chinn and Kramer’s (2015) Knowledge Development provides the foundation and the structure for understanding nursing. Therefore, we proposed using patterns of knowing as a new way to guide student discussions into an academic discourse from different perspectives. Through the four Ways of Knowing, a new lens for discovering new nursing knowledge emerged.  Students were guided to focus discussions on uncovering personal knowing; developing new knowledge through shared nursing experiences; and reflecting upon and becoming aware of new ways to practice.  Framing online discussions into ways of knowing facilitated students dialogue with peers to gain a deeper understanding of what is nursing knowledge. Through their lens each student addressed the topic using personal knowing and experiences; empiric knowing as it supports or refutes nursing knowledge and current practices; ethical knowing and values clarification to develop moral reasoning; and discovering a new awareness of nursing experiences through personal AhHa moments of aesthetic knowing.  The new structure also provided the structure for a new rubric when evaluating participation. The criteria was designed to capture ways of knowing and engagement within the learning environment without restrictions to required numbers of posts or due dates for initial posts. One baccalaureate research course and one graduate leadership course were piloted for the initial implementation of this project. After revisiting outcomes with student and faculty input, the decision was made to begin using the new discussion with Ways of Knowing and Engagement across all nursing courses in the baccalaureate and graduate courses. As courses were revised cues were added to the discussion questions prompting different ways of knowing; participation rubrics included short descriptors to illustrate the four ways of knowing and social presence as criteria for evaluating participation.  Webinars for all adjunct faculty was provided and recorded sessions were added to the courses for faculty reference. Evaluations from students and faculty teaching the courses are confirming success regarding this change. Students report positive feedback when exploring topics and using Reflection and Ways of Knowing as a framework. Peer collaboration is evident and greater sense of community is also evolving with peers and faculty. Faculty report the new rubric design is easy to use as they encourage and evaluate student discourse and identify patterns of knowing in student’s dialogue. Faculty are also using prompts from the rubric to facilitate conversations and advance the dialogue as students deliberate and integrate nursing knowledge into their practice. With the implementation of this new strategy for online discussions, we are hopeful new ways of learning will continue to be actualized. References Anderson-Meger, J. (2014). Examining knowledge beliefs to motivate student learning. Faculty Focus, (July 21, 2014). Retrieved from http://www.facultyfocus.com/ Carper, B. A. (1978). Fundamental patterns of knowing in  nursing. ANS Advances in nursing Science, 1(1), 13-23. Chinn, P. L. & Kramer, M. K. (2015). Knowledge development in nursing: Theory and process (9thed.). St. Louis, MO: Elsevier. Watson, J. & Smith, M. (2002). Caring science and the science of unitary human beings: A trans-theoretical discourse for nursing knowledge development. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 37(5), 452-461.en
dc.subjectOnline Learningen
dc.subjectDiscussionsen
dc.subjectRubricen
dc.date.available2016-03-29T13:11:16Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-29en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-29T13:11:16Zen
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2016en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, and National League for Nursingen
dc.conference.locationWashington, DCen
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference Theme: Research as a Catalyst for Transformative Practiceen
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