Teaching Test Taking Strategies: An Option or Ethical Requirement for Undergraduate Nursing Students?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/603861
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Poster
Title:
Teaching Test Taking Strategies: An Option or Ethical Requirement for Undergraduate Nursing Students?
Author(s):
Brown, Tamara Jessica
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Delta Nu
Author Details:
Tamara Jessica Brown, RN-BC, PCCN, CMSRN, CNE, tjbrown1987@aol.com
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, April 9, 2016, and Friday, April 8, 2016: Investigators: (1) Tamara Jessica Brown, MSN, RN-BC, PCCN, CNE Institution: Georgian Court University, Lakewood, New Jersey Title: Teaching Test Taking Strategies- An Option or Ethical Requirement for Undergraduate Nursing Students? Purpose: In undergraduate nursing students, how does learning test-taking strategies affect the emotions and thoughts during the preparation and exams, and how they perceive tests? Design: The qualitative design implemented was an intrinsic exploratory multiple case study. Methodology: Purposeful sampling was utilized to identify student nurses who had graduated a Baccalaureate nursing program but had yet to successfully pass the NCLEX exam, after more than a single attempt. A semi-structured interview was held, audio-recorded, and transcribed. Systematic coding and analysis of the yielded data was then completed. Major Findings: Before learning test-taking strategies, the students expressed they perceived tests to be designed to ensure students chose the “wrong answer”.  They attributes this to the nursing programs not teaching test-taking strategies but providing test plans or study guides instead. They explains the emphasis was on content and subjects. As a result, the themes emerged of confusion, inability to focus, and test anxiety during nursing exams prior to learning test-taking strategies. As a result of test taking strategies, the students voiced they are better able to identify their strengths and weakness in nursing theory. They also expressed increased confidence, renewed determination, and decreased anxiety during preparation for and during test-taking. After learning test-taking strategies, they explains perceiving tests as measuring their competency as a registered nurse instead of ensuring she choose incorrect items. They conclude that test taking strategies should be taught “from the door” of a baccalaureate nursing program to ensure student test taking success. Conclusion: These students describe their abilities without test-taking strategies as being set up to fail as the faculty focused more on “subjects” and “content”. Nurse faculty have an ethical responsibility to the public and their pupils, in the wake of nursing shortage, to ensure that students are taught test-taking strategies so they can successfully take formative tests throughout their nursing edification and, cumulatively, by ensuring students have the ability to pass the NCLEX-RN. By upholding this responsibility the ethical principles of beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice and the ethical theories of deontology, utilitarianism, casuist, rights, and virtue are fulfilled by nursing academia.
Keywords:
test-taking; ethics; nursing tests
Repository Posting Date:
29-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
29-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
NERC16PST12
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2016
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, and National League for Nursing
Conference Location:
Washington, DC
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference Theme: Research as a Catalyst for Transformative Practice

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleTeaching Test Taking Strategies: An Option or Ethical Requirement for Undergraduate Nursing Students?en
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Tamara Jessicaen
dc.contributor.departmentDelta Nuen
dc.author.detailsTamara Jessica Brown, RN-BC, PCCN, CMSRN, CNE, tjbrown1987@aol.comen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/603861en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, April 9, 2016, and Friday, April 8, 2016: Investigators: (1) Tamara Jessica Brown, MSN, RN-BC, PCCN, CNE Institution: Georgian Court University, Lakewood, New Jersey Title: Teaching Test Taking Strategies- An Option or Ethical Requirement for Undergraduate Nursing Students? Purpose: In undergraduate nursing students, how does learning test-taking strategies affect the emotions and thoughts during the preparation and exams, and how they perceive tests? Design: The qualitative design implemented was an intrinsic exploratory multiple case study. Methodology: Purposeful sampling was utilized to identify student nurses who had graduated a Baccalaureate nursing program but had yet to successfully pass the NCLEX exam, after more than a single attempt. A semi-structured interview was held, audio-recorded, and transcribed. Systematic coding and analysis of the yielded data was then completed. Major Findings: Before learning test-taking strategies, the students expressed they perceived tests to be designed to ensure students chose the “wrong answer”.  They attributes this to the nursing programs not teaching test-taking strategies but providing test plans or study guides instead. They explains the emphasis was on content and subjects. As a result, the themes emerged of confusion, inability to focus, and test anxiety during nursing exams prior to learning test-taking strategies. As a result of test taking strategies, the students voiced they are better able to identify their strengths and weakness in nursing theory. They also expressed increased confidence, renewed determination, and decreased anxiety during preparation for and during test-taking. After learning test-taking strategies, they explains perceiving tests as measuring their competency as a registered nurse instead of ensuring she choose incorrect items. They conclude that test taking strategies should be taught “from the door” of a baccalaureate nursing program to ensure student test taking success. Conclusion: These students describe their abilities without test-taking strategies as being set up to fail as the faculty focused more on “subjects” and “content”. Nurse faculty have an ethical responsibility to the public and their pupils, in the wake of nursing shortage, to ensure that students are taught test-taking strategies so they can successfully take formative tests throughout their nursing edification and, cumulatively, by ensuring students have the ability to pass the NCLEX-RN. By upholding this responsibility the ethical principles of beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice and the ethical theories of deontology, utilitarianism, casuist, rights, and virtue are fulfilled by nursing academia.en
dc.subjecttest-takingen
dc.subjectethicsen
dc.subjectnursing testsen
dc.date.available2016-03-29T13:11:22Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-29en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-29T13:11:22Zen
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2016en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, and National League for Nursingen
dc.conference.locationWashington, DCen
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference Theme: Research as a Catalyst for Transformative Practiceen
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.