Innovation in Public-Health Nursing Education: A Survey of Student Acquisition of Core Knowledge and Competencies

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/603865
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Innovation in Public-Health Nursing Education: A Survey of Student Acquisition of Core Knowledge and Competencies
Other Titles:
Developing and Researching Nursing Related Competencies [Session]
Author(s):
Burkhard, Agnes M.; Sarsfield, Eileen F.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Epsilon Zeta
Author Details:
Agnes M. Burkhard, RN, APHN-BC, agnes.burkhard@marymount.edu; Eileen F. Sarsfield, RN, PHCNS-BC
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, April 9, 2016: Historically, baccalaureate nursing education programs have collaborated with public health departments in facilitating community/public health clinical learning opportunities for students (Broussard, 2011). Recent changes in funding for community and public health services (Broussard, 2011), along with increased competition for clinical placements (Van Doren & Vander Werf, 2012; Keller, Schaffer, Schoon, Brueshoff, & Jost, 2011) have resulted in fewer public health sector placements for students. Community/public health nursing faculty have subsequently been challenged to identify clinical education opportunities that allow students to participate in the delivery of essential public health functions (Institute of Medicine, 2002), and to acquire core knowledge and basic competencies related to nursing and public health as identified by the Association of Community Health Nurse Educators (2010). These challenges, however, have created opportunities for the development of clinical partnerships with non-health sector community organizations where students have the opportunity to apply the theory and science of population health and public health nursing. The development of new partnerships is supported by the recent IOM (2011) report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change and Advancing Health, which challenged health professionals to create non-traditional and innovative care models among academia, communities, and businesses. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate student (n=26) perceptions of the effectiveness of a collaborative partnership among a university, not-for-profit organization providing employment opportunities for individuals who are underserved, and the organization’s health insurance broker.  This partnership served as the basis of a nontraditional community-based clinical placement for undergraduate nursing students enrolled in a community/public health-nursing course. The innovative partnership focused on an integrated workplace health promotion program for an underserved population who were employed in retail and custodial service settings. Using the Workplace Health Model (CDC, 2012), the undergraduate nursing students assumed roles in the assessment, development, and evaluation of a workplace health promotion program aimed at the identification and reduction of health risks both in and out of the workplace. The student-designed interventions specifically focused on navigation of the health system, promoting use of preventative health services, and health education to prevent and manage chronic disease. Using a survey methodology, students participating in the initiative during the semester reported on their perception of acquisition of core community/public health nursing knowledge and skill competencies gained through this non-traditional clinical learning experience. The core competencies under investigation were communication, epidemiology, community/population assessment, health promotion and risk reduction, illness and disease management, information and health care technology, environmental health, human diversity, ethics and social justice, and care coordination. Data were collected over six semesters. Quantitative findings suggested student acquisition of knowledge and skills in key competency areas including communication, health promotion and risk reduction,  and human diversity.  Qualitative data supported the benefits of this clinical placement as an excellent opportunity to enhance student learning in a community/public health nursing course. This study also suggests that using the core competencies of public health nursing is a useful tool in evaluating appropriate clinical education.
Keywords:
public health nursing; innovative partnerships; core competencies
Repository Posting Date:
29-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
29-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
NERC16F02
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2016
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, and National League for Nursing
Conference Location:
Washington, DC
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference Theme: Research as a Catalyst for Transformative Practice

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleInnovation in Public-Health Nursing Education: A Survey of Student Acquisition of Core Knowledge and Competenciesen
dc.title.alternativeDeveloping and Researching Nursing Related Competencies [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorBurkhard, Agnes M.en
dc.contributor.authorSarsfield, Eileen F.en
dc.contributor.departmentEpsilon Zetaen
dc.author.detailsAgnes M. Burkhard, RN, APHN-BC, agnes.burkhard@marymount.edu; Eileen F. Sarsfield, RN, PHCNS-BCen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/603865en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, April 9, 2016: Historically, baccalaureate nursing education programs have collaborated with public health departments in facilitating community/public health clinical learning opportunities for students (Broussard, 2011). Recent changes in funding for community and public health services (Broussard, 2011), along with increased competition for clinical placements (Van Doren & Vander Werf, 2012; Keller, Schaffer, Schoon, Brueshoff, & Jost, 2011) have resulted in fewer public health sector placements for students. Community/public health nursing faculty have subsequently been challenged to identify clinical education opportunities that allow students to participate in the delivery of essential public health functions (Institute of Medicine, 2002), and to acquire core knowledge and basic competencies related to nursing and public health as identified by the Association of Community Health Nurse Educators (2010). These challenges, however, have created opportunities for the development of clinical partnerships with non-health sector community organizations where students have the opportunity to apply the theory and science of population health and public health nursing. The development of new partnerships is supported by the recent IOM (2011) report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change and Advancing Health, which challenged health professionals to create non-traditional and innovative care models among academia, communities, and businesses. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate student (n=26) perceptions of the effectiveness of a collaborative partnership among a university, not-for-profit organization providing employment opportunities for individuals who are underserved, and the organization’s health insurance broker.  This partnership served as the basis of a nontraditional community-based clinical placement for undergraduate nursing students enrolled in a community/public health-nursing course. The innovative partnership focused on an integrated workplace health promotion program for an underserved population who were employed in retail and custodial service settings. Using the Workplace Health Model (CDC, 2012), the undergraduate nursing students assumed roles in the assessment, development, and evaluation of a workplace health promotion program aimed at the identification and reduction of health risks both in and out of the workplace. The student-designed interventions specifically focused on navigation of the health system, promoting use of preventative health services, and health education to prevent and manage chronic disease. Using a survey methodology, students participating in the initiative during the semester reported on their perception of acquisition of core community/public health nursing knowledge and skill competencies gained through this non-traditional clinical learning experience. The core competencies under investigation were communication, epidemiology, community/population assessment, health promotion and risk reduction, illness and disease management, information and health care technology, environmental health, human diversity, ethics and social justice, and care coordination. Data were collected over six semesters. Quantitative findings suggested student acquisition of knowledge and skills in key competency areas including communication, health promotion and risk reduction,  and human diversity.  Qualitative data supported the benefits of this clinical placement as an excellent opportunity to enhance student learning in a community/public health nursing course. This study also suggests that using the core competencies of public health nursing is a useful tool in evaluating appropriate clinical education.en
dc.subjectpublic health nursingen
dc.subjectinnovative partnershipsen
dc.subjectcore competenciesen
dc.date.available2016-03-29T13:11:27Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-29en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-29T13:11:27Zen
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2016en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, and National League for Nursingen
dc.conference.locationWashington, DCen
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference Theme: Research as a Catalyst for Transformative Practiceen
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.