Development and Use of the Simulation Culture Organizational Readiness Survey (SCORS)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/603882
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Poster
Title:
Development and Use of the Simulation Culture Organizational Readiness Survey (SCORS)
Author(s):
Leighton, Kim; Foisy-Doll, Colette
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Chi Nu
Author Details:
Kim Leighton, RN, ANEF, KLeighton@devry.edu; Colette Foisy-Doll, CHSE
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, April 9, 2016, and Friday, April 8, 2016: The use of simulation in nursing education and in clinical practice has grown dramatically over the past several years. The release of findings from the National Council of State Boards of Nursing’s landmark simulation study (Hayden, et al., 2014) may be the catalyst to further increase use of simulation as results showed that up to 50% of clinical time could be replaced with simulation if specific conditions were met. This may be a crucial part of the answer to the ongoing challenges of lack of adequate clinical sites, restrictions that prevent students from participating in certain tasks or skills on the clinical floors, and the inability to ensure appropriate patient assignments correlated to the level of student ability to provide care. However, despite the increase in simulation acceptance as a teaching/learning strategy, there continues to be widespread reports of organizations that have acquired simulator equipment only to have it remain in unopened boxes, stored in closets, or sit unused in laboratory space. There are many theories about why this happens but overall, a failure to ensure that an organization is ready to make this commitment is often the root cause.   The presenters gained permission from Drs. Fineout-Overholt and Melnyk to adapt the Organizational Culture and Readiness for System-wide Integration of Evidence-based Practice Surveyã (2014) to a survey that examines readiness to integrate simulation-based education. Permission was also granted to adapt items from the TeamSTEPPS Readiness Assessment (AHRQ, 2015). The resulting tool, the Simulation Culture Organizational Readiness Survey (SCORS), was validated by an expert panel of simulation educators and researchers. The SCORS has four subscales and a total of 25 items that are answered using a 5-point Likert scale. Scoring guidelines provide a method to help interpret overall score and item scores. A guidebook was developed for users and provides information to help the participant best respond to each item. This presentation is designed to briefly share the development process for the tool, but more importantly, to help the audience understand why it is vital to address organizational readiness prior to instituting a major curricular change such as integrating simulation, as well as the necessity of addressing logistical challenges before the change is implemented. With thoughtful consideration of organizational culture, readiness for change, and ability to support change, organizations may be more successful when integrating simulation-based learning into their programs.
Keywords:
Organizational Readiness; Simulation-based Education; Tool Development
Repository Posting Date:
29-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
29-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
NERC16PST51
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2016
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, and National League for Nursing
Conference Location:
Washington, DC
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference Theme: Research as a Catalyst for Transformative Practice

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleDevelopment and Use of the Simulation Culture Organizational Readiness Survey (SCORS)en
dc.contributor.authorLeighton, Kimen
dc.contributor.authorFoisy-Doll, Coletteen
dc.contributor.departmentChi Nuen
dc.author.detailsKim Leighton, RN, ANEF, KLeighton@devry.edu; Colette Foisy-Doll, CHSEen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/603882en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, April 9, 2016, and Friday, April 8, 2016: The use of simulation in nursing education and in clinical practice has grown dramatically over the past several years. The release of findings from the National Council of State Boards of Nursing’s landmark simulation study (Hayden, et al., 2014) may be the catalyst to further increase use of simulation as results showed that up to 50% of clinical time could be replaced with simulation if specific conditions were met. This may be a crucial part of the answer to the ongoing challenges of lack of adequate clinical sites, restrictions that prevent students from participating in certain tasks or skills on the clinical floors, and the inability to ensure appropriate patient assignments correlated to the level of student ability to provide care. However, despite the increase in simulation acceptance as a teaching/learning strategy, there continues to be widespread reports of organizations that have acquired simulator equipment only to have it remain in unopened boxes, stored in closets, or sit unused in laboratory space. There are many theories about why this happens but overall, a failure to ensure that an organization is ready to make this commitment is often the root cause.   The presenters gained permission from Drs. Fineout-Overholt and Melnyk to adapt the Organizational Culture and Readiness for System-wide Integration of Evidence-based Practice Surveyã (2014) to a survey that examines readiness to integrate simulation-based education. Permission was also granted to adapt items from the TeamSTEPPS Readiness Assessment (AHRQ, 2015). The resulting tool, the Simulation Culture Organizational Readiness Survey (SCORS), was validated by an expert panel of simulation educators and researchers. The SCORS has four subscales and a total of 25 items that are answered using a 5-point Likert scale. Scoring guidelines provide a method to help interpret overall score and item scores. A guidebook was developed for users and provides information to help the participant best respond to each item. This presentation is designed to briefly share the development process for the tool, but more importantly, to help the audience understand why it is vital to address organizational readiness prior to instituting a major curricular change such as integrating simulation, as well as the necessity of addressing logistical challenges before the change is implemented. With thoughtful consideration of organizational culture, readiness for change, and ability to support change, organizations may be more successful when integrating simulation-based learning into their programs.en
dc.subjectOrganizational Readinessen
dc.subjectSimulation-based Educationen
dc.subjectTool Developmenten
dc.date.available2016-03-29T13:11:48Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-29en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-29T13:11:48Zen
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2016en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, and National League for Nursingen
dc.conference.locationWashington, DCen
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference Theme: Research as a Catalyst for Transformative Practiceen
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