Creating Long-Term Solutions to the Nurse Faculty Shortage: Using Qualitative Data

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/603889
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Poster
Title:
Creating Long-Term Solutions to the Nurse Faculty Shortage: Using Qualitative Data
Author(s):
Fox, Diane Porretta
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Rho
Author Details:
Diane Porretta Fox, LRT, RN, CNE, dfox2@emich.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, April 9, 2016, and Friday, April 8, 2016: This is a time of scarce resources for nursing faculty hiring and retention. A qualitative study used to investigate the nurse faculty shortage identified the necessity of a long term solution. Reflection by nursing education administrators was used to examine the problem. Addressing the nurse faculty shortage has been identified by Benner et al. (2010) as necessary improving nursing education. Qualitative data was gathered using an inductive inquiry, making meaning of the complex nurse faculty shortage. Prior to this study three studies were uncovered reporting long-term strategies as solutions to the nurse faculty shortage (Dunham-Taylor et al., 2007; Stuart et al., 2010; Kowalski & Kelly, 2013). The qualitative data created six cases exploring strategies for dealing with the nurse faculty shortage from a convenience sample in one state. The nursing education leaders were from schools of nursing offering pre-licensure Baccalaureate of Science in Nursing (BSN) degrees. A looming nurse faculty shortage adds urgency to creating long-term solutions to the nurse faculty shortage. A significant barrier to faculty recruitment and retention cited in the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (October, 2013) Special Survey on Vacant Faculty Positions for Academic Year 2013-14 was high faculty workload. The barriers to hiring faculty are known.  More importantly, the ascent of nurse faculty retirements was expected to begin in 2015 (Seila, et al., 2008). This qualitative study found the most common need, identified by the interviewee, was for faculty to replace retiring faculty. Constructing meaning through reflection upon the data gathered resulted in several aspects related to successful strategies to improve the nurse faculty shortage problem. These aspects include the need to identify “nurse faculty trends” (Falk, 2014, p. 41). Also, frequently easy quick fixes are implemented while ignoring root causes of the problem (Kowalski & Kelley, 2013). “Although national strategies to address the nursing shortage continue to emerge, it is often at the state level where practice and education are regulated” (Green, Kishi, & Esperat, 2010, p.2). Ensuring a BSN registered nurse workforce that is adequate to care for U.S. patients depends on creating and implementing long-term solutions to the nurse faculty shortage. This study reveals the need for solutions to the nurse faculty shortage and the strategies to attain them will involve more than just the nursing educational leaders, faculty, and students.
Keywords:
Qualitative; Faculty; Education
Repository Posting Date:
29-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
29-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
NERC16PST30
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2016
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, and National League for Nursing
Conference Location:
Washington, DC
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference Theme: Research as a Catalyst for Transformative Practice

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleCreating Long-Term Solutions to the Nurse Faculty Shortage: Using Qualitative Dataen
dc.contributor.authorFox, Diane Porrettaen
dc.contributor.departmentRhoen
dc.author.detailsDiane Porretta Fox, LRT, RN, CNE, dfox2@emich.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/603889en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, April 9, 2016, and Friday, April 8, 2016: This is a time of scarce resources for nursing faculty hiring and retention. A qualitative study used to investigate the nurse faculty shortage identified the necessity of a long term solution. Reflection by nursing education administrators was used to examine the problem. Addressing the nurse faculty shortage has been identified by Benner et al. (2010) as necessary improving nursing education. Qualitative data was gathered using an inductive inquiry, making meaning of the complex nurse faculty shortage. Prior to this study three studies were uncovered reporting long-term strategies as solutions to the nurse faculty shortage (Dunham-Taylor et al., 2007; Stuart et al., 2010; Kowalski & Kelly, 2013). The qualitative data created six cases exploring strategies for dealing with the nurse faculty shortage from a convenience sample in one state. The nursing education leaders were from schools of nursing offering pre-licensure Baccalaureate of Science in Nursing (BSN) degrees. A looming nurse faculty shortage adds urgency to creating long-term solutions to the nurse faculty shortage. A significant barrier to faculty recruitment and retention cited in the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (October, 2013) Special Survey on Vacant Faculty Positions for Academic Year 2013-14 was high faculty workload. The barriers to hiring faculty are known.  More importantly, the ascent of nurse faculty retirements was expected to begin in 2015 (Seila, et al., 2008). This qualitative study found the most common need, identified by the interviewee, was for faculty to replace retiring faculty. Constructing meaning through reflection upon the data gathered resulted in several aspects related to successful strategies to improve the nurse faculty shortage problem. These aspects include the need to identify “nurse faculty trends” (Falk, 2014, p. 41). Also, frequently easy quick fixes are implemented while ignoring root causes of the problem (Kowalski & Kelley, 2013). “Although national strategies to address the nursing shortage continue to emerge, it is often at the state level where practice and education are regulated” (Green, Kishi, & Esperat, 2010, p.2). Ensuring a BSN registered nurse workforce that is adequate to care for U.S. patients depends on creating and implementing long-term solutions to the nurse faculty shortage. This study reveals the need for solutions to the nurse faculty shortage and the strategies to attain them will involve more than just the nursing educational leaders, faculty, and students.en
dc.subjectQualitativeen
dc.subjectFacultyen
dc.subjectEducationen
dc.date.available2016-03-29T13:11:57Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-29en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-29T13:11:57Zen
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2016en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, and National League for Nursingen
dc.conference.locationWashington, DCen
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference Theme: Research as a Catalyst for Transformative Practiceen
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