Clinical Judgement in Baccalaureate Pre-Licensure Nursing Students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/603895
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Clinical Judgement in Baccalaureate Pre-Licensure Nursing Students
Other Titles:
Clinical Skills Assessment [Session]
Author(s):
Grochowski Manetti, Wendy
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Iota Omega
Author Details:
Wendy Grochowski Manetti, RN, CRNP, NP-C, wendy.manetti@scranton.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, April 9, 2016: Good clinical judgement is an essential component of clinical competence to ensure the delivery of quality, safe nursing care.  Health care administrators and experienced nurses have voiced concerns that novice nurses lack the clinical judgement necessary for entry into practice.  Therefore, nurse educators have the responsibility to foster clinical judgement development in nursing students and to assess its adequacy.  There is a lack of evidence-based tools to evaluate students’ clinical performance and more specifically clinical judgement.  This descriptive, comparative study described and compared the clinical judgement of junior and senior baccalaureate pre-licensure nursing students in the clinical setting using the Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric (LCJR).  Tanner’s Integrative Model of Clinical Judgement (IMCJ) provided the theoretical foundation for this study and the development of the research instrument.  The clinical judgement of 75 junior and 61 senior baccalaureate, pre-licensure nursing students was assessed by clinical faculty using the LCJR in the medical-surgical clinical setting at the end of one semester.  Statistical methods used to analyze the data included descriptive statistics, independent t-tests, and multivariate analysis of variance. Senior baccalaureate, pre-licensure nursing students were found to have significantly higher total and subscale scores of clinical judgement on the LCJR than junior baccalaureate, pre-licensure nursing students.  Additional analyses revealed that both junior and senior students with health care work experience had higher clinical judgement scores than students not working in healthcare.  The findings of this study contributed to the growing body of nursing knowledge about clinical judgement, Tanner’s IMCJ, and Lasater’s LCJR.  Utilization of findings could guide teaching-learning strategies to foster clinical judgement development in nursing students and ultimately produce better prepared novice nurses for the practice setting.  Findings from this study provide nurse managers valuable information about the level of clinical judgement of the new graduate nurse.  This information can provide direction as to the content and length of mentored preceptorships programs and the type of unit a novice is best suited.
Keywords:
clinical judgement; clinical decision making; assessment
Repository Posting Date:
29-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
29-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
NERC16E02
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2016
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, and National League for Nursing
Conference Location:
Washington, DC
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference Theme: Research as a Catalyst for Transformative Practice

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleClinical Judgement in Baccalaureate Pre-Licensure Nursing Studentsen
dc.title.alternativeClinical Skills Assessment [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorGrochowski Manetti, Wendyen
dc.contributor.departmentIota Omegaen
dc.author.detailsWendy Grochowski Manetti, RN, CRNP, NP-C, wendy.manetti@scranton.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/603895en
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, April 9, 2016: Good clinical judgement is an essential component of clinical competence to ensure the delivery of quality, safe nursing care.  Health care administrators and experienced nurses have voiced concerns that novice nurses lack the clinical judgement necessary for entry into practice.  Therefore, nurse educators have the responsibility to foster clinical judgement development in nursing students and to assess its adequacy.  There is a lack of evidence-based tools to evaluate students’ clinical performance and more specifically clinical judgement.  This descriptive, comparative study described and compared the clinical judgement of junior and senior baccalaureate pre-licensure nursing students in the clinical setting using the Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric (LCJR).  Tanner’s Integrative Model of Clinical Judgement (IMCJ) provided the theoretical foundation for this study and the development of the research instrument.  The clinical judgement of 75 junior and 61 senior baccalaureate, pre-licensure nursing students was assessed by clinical faculty using the LCJR in the medical-surgical clinical setting at the end of one semester.  Statistical methods used to analyze the data included descriptive statistics, independent t-tests, and multivariate analysis of variance. Senior baccalaureate, pre-licensure nursing students were found to have significantly higher total and subscale scores of clinical judgement on the LCJR than junior baccalaureate, pre-licensure nursing students.  Additional analyses revealed that both junior and senior students with health care work experience had higher clinical judgement scores than students not working in healthcare.  The findings of this study contributed to the growing body of nursing knowledge about clinical judgement, Tanner’s IMCJ, and Lasater’s LCJR.  Utilization of findings could guide teaching-learning strategies to foster clinical judgement development in nursing students and ultimately produce better prepared novice nurses for the practice setting.  Findings from this study provide nurse managers valuable information about the level of clinical judgement of the new graduate nurse.  This information can provide direction as to the content and length of mentored preceptorships programs and the type of unit a novice is best suited.en
dc.subjectclinical judgementen
dc.subjectclinical decision makingen
dc.subjectassessmenten
dc.date.available2016-03-29T13:12:07Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-29en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-29T13:12:07Zen
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2016en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, and National League for Nursingen
dc.conference.locationWashington, DCen
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference Theme: Research as a Catalyst for Transformative Practiceen
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