Nutrition Education Content in Nurse Practitioner Curricula: What are Michigan NP's Learning About Nutrition?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/610904
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
DNP Capstone Project
Level of Evidence:
Other
Research Approach:
Other
Title:
Nutrition Education Content in Nurse Practitioner Curricula: What are Michigan NP's Learning About Nutrition?
Author(s):
Trapp, Caroline; O'Connor, Nancy; Hasenau, Susan M.; Schmitz, Karen
Additional Author Information:
Caroline Trapp, DNP, ANP-BC, CDE, FAANP, email: ctrapp@pcrm.org
Advisors:
O'Connor, Nancy
Degree:
DNP
Degree Year:
2015
Grantor:
Madonna University
Abstract:

Abstract

Background and Purpose: Unhealthy diets are linked to common chronic diseases in the U.S. and Michigan. Healthy People 2020 calls for more nutrition counseling in primary care office visits. The last known survey of nutrition education in nursing graduate programs was published in 2001. This study describes the current state of adult-gerontology nutrition education within primary care nurse practitioner curricula in Michigan.

Methods: Program chairs (or their designees) at the 11 Michigan universities with Adult-Gerontology (AGNP) and/or Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) programs were asked to complete an anonymous, electronic 21-question survey.?

Conclusions: Six surveys were returned. Respondents, including primarily program directors, indicated that the majority of students receive less than 10 hours of instruction, the majority of which is classroom rather than experiential or clinical. None of the faculty responsible for teaching nutrition content have degrees in nutrition. All of the respondents indicated that nutrition instruction was insufficient.

Implications for Practice: This study identifies a possible gap in the educational preparation of primary care NP graduates to adequately address nutritional issues that underlie many chronic diseases. Additional research is needed.

Keywords:
nutrition education; nurse practitioners education
MeSH:
Education, Nursing; Nurse Practitioners
Note:
This work has been approved through a faculty review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.
Repository Posting Date:
2016-05-27T16:43:26Z
Date of Publication:
2016-05-27

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorO'Connor, Nancyen
dc.contributor.authorTrapp, Carolineen
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Nancyen
dc.contributor.authorHasenau, Susan M.en
dc.contributor.authorSchmitz, Karenen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-27T16:43:26Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-27T16:43:26Z-
dc.date.issued2016-05-27-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/610904-
dc.description.abstract<p class="APA" align="center"><strong>Abstract</strong></p> <p class="APA"><strong>Background and Purpose</strong>: Unhealthy diets are linked to common chronic diseases in the U.S. and Michigan. <em>Healthy People 2020</em> calls for more nutrition counseling in primary care office visits. The last known survey of nutrition education in nursing graduate programs was published in 2001. This study describes the current state of adult-gerontology nutrition education within primary care nurse practitioner curricula in Michigan.</p> <p class="APA"><strong>Methods</strong>: Program chairs (or their designees) at the 11 Michigan universities with Adult-Gerontology (AGNP) and/or Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) programs were asked to complete an anonymous, electronic 21-question survey.?</p> <p class="APA"><strong>Conclusions:</strong> Six surveys were returned. Respondents, including primarily program directors, indicated that the majority of students receive less than 10 hours of instruction, the majority of which is classroom rather than experiential or clinical. None of the faculty responsible for teaching nutrition content have degrees in nutrition. All of the respondents indicated that nutrition instruction was insufficient.</p> <p class="APA"><strong>Implications for Practice</strong>: This study identifies a possible gap in the educational preparation of primary care NP graduates to adequately address nutritional issues that underlie many chronic diseases. Additional research is needed.</p>en
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectnutrition educationen
dc.subjectnurse practitioners educationen
dc.subject.meshEducation, Nursingen
dc.subject.meshNurse Practitionersen
dc.titleNutrition Education Content in Nurse Practitioner Curricula: What are Michigan NP's Learning About Nutrition?en_US
dc.typeDNP Capstone Projecten
thesis.degree.grantorMadonna Universityen
thesis.degree.levelDNPen
dc.description.noteThis work has been approved through a faculty review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.-
dc.primary-author.detailsCaroline Trapp, DNP, ANP-BC, CDE, FAANP, email: ctrapp@pcrm.orgen
thesis.degree.year2015en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.evidence.levelOtheren
dc.research.approachOtheren
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