2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/612438
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
Literature Review
Research Approach:
Translational Research/Evidence-based Practice
Title:
Disposable Blood Pressure Cuffs: A Safer Alternative
Author(s):
Goeckner, Jessica; Lansden, Joseph; Blanke, Katherine; Campbell, Laura; Minnette, Rebekah; Phelps, Reagan; Neidig, Christopher; Robinson, Megan; Schentrup, Samuel; Bailey, Rachel; Hicks, Megan
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Jessica Goeckner, BSN, RN, Jbgoeckner at eagles dot usi dot edu;Joseph Lansden, BSN, RN; Katherine Blanke, SN; Laura Campbell, SN; Rebekah Minnette, SN; Reagan Phelps, SN; Christopher Neidig, SN; Megan Robinson, SN; Samuel Schentrup, SN; Rachel Bailey, SN; Megan Hicks, SN
Abstract:

Background

Health care acquired infections are avoidable and not only cause patient suffering but are also costly to the hospitals.  These unintentional infections cost hospitals approximately 35-45 billion dollars per year. Blood pressure (BP) cuffs are potential reservoirs for bacteria and using disposable cuffs could eliminate one way of transmission of disease from patient to patient.

Clinical Question

Does the use of disposable BP cuffs as opposed to reusable BP cuffs decrease infection rates in inpatient adults during their hospital stay?

Literature Search

A search on Medline, Academic Search Premier and CINAHL revealed one randomized control trial, one controlled trial, four case control studies, one qualitative study pertaining to our topic. The search of literature found research supporting the use of disposable BP cuffs to decrease the spread of bacteria, demonstrated the cost effectiveness of the cuffs and the financial benefits to the hospitals.

Integration into Practice

Students presented findings to an orthopedic unit at a regional hospital in 2014.  Many Registered Nurses were in attendance as well as a manager, human resources representatives, Chief Nursing Officer of the hospital and the Vice President of Operations. Students proposed, based on evidence, to change practice by adopting disposable BP cuffs. 

The presentations validity spurred action.  Our information and suggestions were taken to Lean Six Sigma meeting and considered. Our exact goal was not implemented, but changes were made based on our findings.  BP cuffs were replaced on some units to increase sanitation, but were the reusable type.  The hospital’s microbiologist was prompted to conduct a more extensive literature search.  Furthermore, the nursing students gained knowledge of evidence based practice principles as well as the power of evidence in affecting change in the clinical setting.  

Keywords:
Disposable Equipment; blood pressure cuffs; hospital acquired infection
CINAHL Headings:
Blood Pressure Devices; Disposable Equipment; Cross Infection; Cross Infection--Prevention and Control
Repository Posting Date:
9-Jun-2016
Date of Publication:
9-Jun-2016
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
Research, Evidence-Based Practice and Performance Improvement in Healthcare Conference
Conference Host:
University of Southern Indiana
Conference Location:
Evansville, Indiana, USA
Description:
This item has been submitted to the repository as part of a collective effort of the nursing faculty and students of the University of Southern Indiana (USI), College of Nursing and Health Professions. This broad dissemination effort will increase the visibility and impact of the work of the USI nursing program and benefit nurses and the nursing profession on a global level.
Note:
This work has been approved through a peer-review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelLiterature Reviewen
dc.research.approachTranslational Research/Evidence-based Practiceen
dc.titleDisposable Blood Pressure Cuffs: A Safer Alternativeen_US
dc.contributor.authorGoeckner, Jessicaen
dc.contributor.authorLansden, Josephen
dc.contributor.authorBlanke, Katherineen
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Lauraen
dc.contributor.authorMinnette, Rebekahen
dc.contributor.authorPhelps, Reaganen
dc.contributor.authorNeidig, Christopheren
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, Meganen
dc.contributor.authorSchentrup, Samuelen
dc.contributor.authorBailey, Rachelen
dc.contributor.authorHicks, Meganen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsJessica Goeckner, BSN, RN, Jbgoeckner at eagles dot usi dot edu;Joseph Lansden, BSN, RN; Katherine Blanke, SN; Laura Campbell, SN; Rebekah Minnette, SN; Reagan Phelps, SN; Christopher Neidig, SN; Megan Robinson, SN; Samuel Schentrup, SN; Rachel Bailey, SN; Megan Hicks, SNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/612438-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Background</strong></p> <p>Health care acquired infections are avoidable and not only cause patient suffering but are also costly to the hospitals.  These unintentional infections cost hospitals approximately 35-45 billion dollars per year. Blood pressure (BP) cuffs are potential reservoirs for bacteria and using disposable cuffs could eliminate one way of transmission of disease from patient to patient.</p> <p><strong>Clinical Question</strong></p> <p>Does the use of disposable BP cuffs as opposed to reusable BP cuffs decrease infection rates in inpatient adults during their hospital stay?</p> <p><strong>Literature Search</strong></p> <p>A search on Medline, Academic Search Premier and CINAHL revealed one randomized control trial, one controlled trial, four case control studies, one qualitative study pertaining to our topic. The search of literature found research supporting the use of disposable BP cuffs to decrease the spread of bacteria, demonstrated the cost effectiveness of the cuffs and the financial benefits to the hospitals.</p> <p><strong>Integration into Practice</strong></p> <p>Students presented findings to an orthopedic unit at a regional hospital in 2014.  Many Registered Nurses were in attendance as well as a manager, human resources representatives, Chief Nursing Officer of the hospital and the Vice President of Operations. Students proposed, based on evidence, to change practice by adopting disposable BP cuffs. </p> <p>The presentations validity spurred action.  Our information and suggestions were taken to Lean Six Sigma meeting and considered. Our exact goal was not implemented, but changes were made based on our findings.  BP cuffs were replaced on some units to increase sanitation, but were the reusable type.  The hospital’s microbiologist was prompted to conduct a more extensive literature search.  Furthermore, the nursing students gained knowledge of evidence based practice principles as well as the power of evidence in affecting change in the clinical setting.  </p>en
dc.subjectDisposable Equipmenten
dc.subjectblood pressure cuffsen
dc.subjecthospital acquired infectionen
dc.subject.cinahlBlood Pressure Devicesen
dc.subject.cinahlDisposable Equipmenten
dc.subject.cinahlCross Infectionen
dc.subject.cinahlCross Infection--Prevention and Controlen
dc.date.available2016-06-09T19:06:26Z-
dc.date.issued2016-06-09-
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-09T19:06:26Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameResearch, Evidence-Based Practice and Performance Improvement in Healthcare Conferenceen
dc.conference.hostUniversity of Southern Indianaen
dc.conference.locationEvansville, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionThis item has been submitted to the repository as part of a collective effort of the nursing faculty and students of the University of Southern Indiana (USI), College of Nursing and Health Professions. This broad dissemination effort will increase the visibility and impact of the work of the USI nursing program and benefit nurses and the nursing profession on a global level.en
dc.description.noteThis work has been approved through a peer-review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.en
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