24.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/614098
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
DNP Capstone Project
Level of Evidence:
Clinical Practice Guideline(s)
Research Approach:
Translational Research/Evidence-based Practice
Title:
Procalcitonin as a Prognostic Indicator of Risk for Sepsis in the Neonate
Author(s):
Cecil, Tara L.; Intermountain Healthcare; Saulpaugh, Janine Marie; Umberger III, Paul Repass
Additional Author Information:
Tara L. Cecil, RN, DNP, MSN, BSN, APRN, CPNP-AC
Advisors:
Saulpaugh, Janine; Umberger, Paul; Watkins, Katherine Dolan
Degree:
DNP
Degree Year:
2016
Grantor:
Northern Arizona University
Abstract:

Introduction. Procalcitonin (PCT) is a biomarker that rises at the onset of bacterial infection while remaining relatively low in other inflammatory processes. Diagnosing serious bacterial infection (SBI) in neonates presenting with fever without a source (FWS) is challenging and utilizing PCT can improve this process. This paper presents a synthesis of the evidence supporting PCT as a prognostic indicator in neonates. Methodology. A comprehensive literature review was conducted to develop practice recommendations. A guideline, the Intermountain Healthcare Care Process Model (2013), was modified to include PCT, which was then validated by a panel of clinical experts. Results. Evidence supports the use of PCT as a prognostic indicator. Clinical expert feedback supports using the modified Intermountain Healthcare Care Process Model (2013) in practice. Discussion. PCT is a valuable serum biomarker that should be examined in the workup of neonates presenting with FWS and a modified algorithm to include PCT is presented.

Keywords:
procalcitonin; neonatal; sepsis; serious bacterial infection; fever without a source
CINAHL Headings:
Calcitonin; Calcitonin--Blood; Sepsis--Prognosis; Sepsis; Neonatal Sepsis; Fever of Unknown Origin; Bacterial Infection
Note:
This work has been approved through a faculty review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.
Repository Posting Date:
2016-06-22T15:28:09Z
Date of Publication:
2016-06-22

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorSaulpaugh, Janineen
dc.contributor.advisorUmberger, Paulen
dc.contributor.advisorWatkins, Katherine Dolanen
dc.contributor.authorCecil, Tara L.en
dc.contributor.authorIntermountain Healthcareen
dc.contributor.authorSaulpaugh, Janine Marieen
dc.contributor.authorUmberger III, Paul Repassen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-22T15:28:09Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-22T15:28:09Z-
dc.date.issued2016-06-22-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/614098-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Introduction.</strong> Procalcitonin (PCT) is a biomarker that rises at the onset of bacterial infection while remaining relatively low in other inflammatory processes. Diagnosing serious bacterial infection (SBI) in neonates presenting with fever without a source (FWS) is challenging and utilizing PCT can improve this process. This paper presents a synthesis of the evidence supporting PCT as a prognostic indicator in neonates. <strong>Methodology. </strong>A comprehensive literature review was conducted to develop practice recommendations. A guideline, the Intermountain Healthcare Care Process Model (2013), was modified to include PCT, which was then validated by a panel of clinical experts. <strong>Results.</strong> Evidence supports the use of PCT as a prognostic indicator. Clinical expert feedback supports using the modified Intermountain Healthcare Care Process Model (2013) in practice. <strong>Discussion.</strong> PCT is a valuable serum biomarker that should be examined in the workup of neonates presenting with FWS and a modified algorithm to include PCT is presented.</p>en
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectprocalcitoninen
dc.subjectneonatalen
dc.subjectsepsisen
dc.subjectserious bacterial infectionen
dc.subjectfever without a sourceen
dc.titleProcalcitonin as a Prognostic Indicator of Risk for Sepsis in the Neonateen_US
dc.typeDNP Capstone Projecten
thesis.degree.grantorNorthern Arizona Universityen
thesis.degree.levelDNPen
dc.description.noteThis work has been approved through a faculty review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.-
dc.primary-author.detailsTara L. Cecil, RN, DNP, MSN, BSN, APRN, CPNP-ACen
thesis.degree.year2016en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.evidence.levelClinical Practice Guideline(s)en
dc.research.approachTranslational Research/Evidence-based Practiceen
dc.subject.cinahlCalcitoninen
dc.subject.cinahlCalcitonin--Blooden
dc.subject.cinahlSepsis--Prognosisen
dc.subject.cinahlSepsisen
dc.subject.cinahlNeonatal Sepsisen
dc.subject.cinahlFever of Unknown Originen
dc.subject.cinahlBacterial Infectionen
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