2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/616018
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Preferable Future for Nursing Curriculum
Other Titles:
Development and Revisions of Nursing Curriculum
Author(s):
Korniewicz, Denise
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Tau
Author Details:
Denise Korniewicz, RN, FAAN, denise.korniewicz@atitesting.com
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, July 24, 2016: Purpose: Nursing education continues to be reinventing the same traditional nursing curriculum of the past.' Although today we call it ?concept based nursing curriculum? the content continues to be the same.' The focus of this presentation is to help transition nurse educators into redefining nursing curricula to meet the competencies of the future nurse workforce. What we have done in the past will not meet the workforce needs of the future since the skills of the future are not skills that are being taught in today?s nursing programs.' Methods: A comprehensive review of literature was conducted to determine the content, courses and teaching strategies that were used to develop nursing curricula during the past 50 years.' A simple checklist was created to review the research and descriptive manuscripts that were published to determine nursing curricula content trends.' The checklist included terms used for courses, content, data provided as well as any analysis or results. Results: Over 100 manuscripts associated were reviewed with less than 20% providing data or analysis. Thus, research projects associated with nursing curricula and change in the content or courses remains scant.'' However, several general themes related to nursing education were evident and provided a framework for nurse educators to consider for changing nursing curricula to meet the needs of the future healthcare delivery systems. Conclusion: Nurse Educators need to embrace change and develop nursing curricula that is progressive and meets the needs of the ever changing health workforce.' Specific examples include: co-creating inter-professional clinical teaching learning models, enhancing clinical simulation as a substitute for clinical practice, developing consumer based clinical application patient education models, and enhancing active learning strategies that engage students and faculty as team members.' Nurse Educators need to embrace change and develop nursing curricula that is progressive and meets the needs of the ever changing health workforce.' Specific examples include: co-creating inter-professional clinical teaching learning models, enhancing clinical simulation as a substitute for clinical practice, developing consumer based clinical application patient education models, and enhancing active learning strategies that engage students and faculty as team members.' Nurse Educators need to embrace change and develop nursing curricula that is progressive and meets the needs of the ever changing health workforce.' Specific examples include: co-creating inter-professional clinical teaching learning models, enhancing clinical simulation as a substitute for clinical practice, developing consumer based clinical application patient education models, and enhancing active learning strategies that engage students and faculty as team members.
Keywords:
nursing; curricula; global
Repository Posting Date:
13-Jul-2016
Date of Publication:
13-Jul-2016 ; 13-Jul-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC16L04; INRC16L04
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
27th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Cape Town, South Africa
Description:
Theme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleThe Preferable Future for Nursing Curriculumen
dc.title.alternativeDevelopment and Revisions of Nursing Curriculumen
dc.contributor.authorKorniewicz, Deniseen
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Tauen
dc.author.detailsDenise Korniewicz, RN, FAAN, denise.korniewicz@atitesting.comen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/616018-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, July 24, 2016: Purpose: Nursing education continues to be reinventing the same traditional nursing curriculum of the past.' Although today we call it ?concept based nursing curriculum? the content continues to be the same.' The focus of this presentation is to help transition nurse educators into redefining nursing curricula to meet the competencies of the future nurse workforce. What we have done in the past will not meet the workforce needs of the future since the skills of the future are not skills that are being taught in today?s nursing programs.' Methods: A comprehensive review of literature was conducted to determine the content, courses and teaching strategies that were used to develop nursing curricula during the past 50 years.' A simple checklist was created to review the research and descriptive manuscripts that were published to determine nursing curricula content trends.' The checklist included terms used for courses, content, data provided as well as any analysis or results. Results: Over 100 manuscripts associated were reviewed with less than 20% providing data or analysis. Thus, research projects associated with nursing curricula and change in the content or courses remains scant.'' However, several general themes related to nursing education were evident and provided a framework for nurse educators to consider for changing nursing curricula to meet the needs of the future healthcare delivery systems. Conclusion: Nurse Educators need to embrace change and develop nursing curricula that is progressive and meets the needs of the ever changing health workforce.' Specific examples include: co-creating inter-professional clinical teaching learning models, enhancing clinical simulation as a substitute for clinical practice, developing consumer based clinical application patient education models, and enhancing active learning strategies that engage students and faculty as team members.' Nurse Educators need to embrace change and develop nursing curricula that is progressive and meets the needs of the ever changing health workforce.' Specific examples include: co-creating inter-professional clinical teaching learning models, enhancing clinical simulation as a substitute for clinical practice, developing consumer based clinical application patient education models, and enhancing active learning strategies that engage students and faculty as team members.' Nurse Educators need to embrace change and develop nursing curricula that is progressive and meets the needs of the ever changing health workforce.' Specific examples include: co-creating inter-professional clinical teaching learning models, enhancing clinical simulation as a substitute for clinical practice, developing consumer based clinical application patient education models, and enhancing active learning strategies that engage students and faculty as team members.en
dc.subjectnursingen
dc.subjectcurriculaen
dc.subjectglobalen
dc.date.available2016-07-13T11:01:52Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-13T11:01:52Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.name27th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationCape Town, South Africaen
dc.descriptionTheme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policyen
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