Best Clinical Nursing Education Practices in Sub-Saharan Africa: An Integrative Literature Review

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/616022
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Best Clinical Nursing Education Practices in Sub-Saharan Africa: An Integrative Literature Review
Other Titles:
Evidence-Based Curriculum in Nursing Education
Author(s):
Kpodo, Christmal Jonah; Thurling, Catherine Hilary; Armstrong, Susan Jennifer
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Christmal Jonah Kpodo, RGN, 869108@students.wits.ac.za; Catherine Hilary Thurling, PN; Susan Jennifer Armstrong, NE
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, July 24, 2016: Purpose: The purpose of the study is to evaluate available evidence on clinical nursing education practices in Sub-Saharan Africa and to describe the best clinical nursing education practices in Sub-Saharan Africa to inform practice in the sub region.' Methods: Ganong (1987) framework of integrated literature review was used to review articles published from January 2004 to May 2015 in Science Direct, EBSCO host, PubMed, Wiley Online Library and Google Scholar . Articles were included if they were published in English, on clinical nursing education practices, on pre-registration nursing education and on Sub-Saharan Africa. Author and setting, journal and year, design, population and sample, data collection and analysis method, focus of clinical nursing education, findings and recommendations were extracted from the included articles using Sparbel and Anderson?s (2000) data collection tool. After scanning the titles of 261 975 articles pulled out by various key search words, 204 abstracts were read and 119 full articles retrieved for evaluation. 42 (16 quantitative, 17 qualitative, 3 mixed method and 6 programme evaluation reports) peer reviewed articles were finally included in the study through the consensus of three authors. A five staged thematic analysis (data reduction, data display, data comparison, drawing of conclusions and verification) was used to analyse the data in this study. Results: 'Majority (85.7 %) of the articles included in this study are from Southern Africa, 11.9% from East Africa and 2.4% from West Africa. Curationis recorded the most publications (47.6%) of articles included in this study). Out of the one hundred and sixteen (116) authors that appeared on the articles included in this study, majority (90) came from Sub-Saharan Africa whereas 26 were from institutions outside Sub-Saharan Africa. Out of the 35 multi-authored articles, fourteen (14) were authored from the same institution whereas thirteen (13) articles were published by authors from two different institutions, two (2) articles each were published by authors from three and four different institutions whereas four (4) articles were published by authors from more than four institutions. The following best clinical nursing education themes were identified and described:'Having a well-developed clinical education programme in place; synergy between Nursing Education Institutions (NEI) and clinical facility; roles of institutions, clinical instructors and students in clinical teaching and learning and Continuous Professional Development of clinical instructors. From the findings of the study, best clinical nursing education practices in Sub-Saharan Africa were described in three phases: before, during and after clinical placement in addition to the effective communication, consultation and collaborative practices before, during and after clinical placement.'Conclusion: 'As very important as these practices are to clinical nursing education in SSA, the researchers hold the view that they may not be very responsive to the peculiar health needs of Sub-Saharan Africa as they are universal and not unique to Sub-Saharan Africa. This is asa result of the Eurocentric nature of Clinical nursing education research publications in Sub-Saharan Africa are Eurocentric and are not effectively meeting the peculiar health needs of Sub-Saharan Africa. We therefore recommend that nursing education institutions within Sub-Saharan Africa appraise and inculcate the findings from this study into their clinical nursing education programmes while evaluating the programmes and products on how responsive they are to the peculiar health needs of the sub-region. Further studies should be conducted on how nursing education curriculum could be designed to meet the peculiar health needs of Sub-Saharan Africa. The eastern and western parts of Sub-Saharan Africa need to conduct and publish more works on clinical nursing education within their sub-regions. As very important as these practices are to clinical nursing education in SSA, the researcher holds the view that they may not be very responsive to the peculiar health needs of Sub-Saharan Africa as they are universal and not unique to Sub-Saharan Africa. Clinical nursing education research publications in Sub-Saharan Africa are Eurocentric and are not effectively meeting the peculiar health needs of Sub-Saharan Africa. We therefore recommend that nursing education institutions within Sub-Saharan Africa appraise and inculcate the findings from this study into their clinical nursing education programmes while evaluating the programmes and products on how responsive they are to the peculiar health needs of the sub-region. Further studies should be conducted on how nursing education curriculum could be designed to meet the peculiar health needs of Sub-Saharan Africa. The eastern and western parts of Sub-Saharan Africa need to conduct and publish more works on clinical nursing education within their sub-regions.
Keywords:
best practices; clinical nursing education; Sub-Saharan Africa
Repository Posting Date:
13-Jul-2016
Date of Publication:
13-Jul-2016 ; 13-Jul-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC16L02; INRC16L02
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
27th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Cape Town, South Africa
Description:
Theme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleBest Clinical Nursing Education Practices in Sub-Saharan Africa: An Integrative Literature Reviewen
dc.title.alternativeEvidence-Based Curriculum in Nursing Educationen
dc.contributor.authorKpodo, Christmal Jonahen
dc.contributor.authorThurling, Catherine Hilaryen
dc.contributor.authorArmstrong, Susan Jenniferen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsChristmal Jonah Kpodo, RGN, 869108@students.wits.ac.za; Catherine Hilary Thurling, PN; Susan Jennifer Armstrong, NEen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/616022-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, July 24, 2016: Purpose: The purpose of the study is to evaluate available evidence on clinical nursing education practices in Sub-Saharan Africa and to describe the best clinical nursing education practices in Sub-Saharan Africa to inform practice in the sub region.' Methods: Ganong (1987) framework of integrated literature review was used to review articles published from January 2004 to May 2015 in Science Direct, EBSCO host, PubMed, Wiley Online Library and Google Scholar . Articles were included if they were published in English, on clinical nursing education practices, on pre-registration nursing education and on Sub-Saharan Africa. Author and setting, journal and year, design, population and sample, data collection and analysis method, focus of clinical nursing education, findings and recommendations were extracted from the included articles using Sparbel and Anderson?s (2000) data collection tool. After scanning the titles of 261 975 articles pulled out by various key search words, 204 abstracts were read and 119 full articles retrieved for evaluation. 42 (16 quantitative, 17 qualitative, 3 mixed method and 6 programme evaluation reports) peer reviewed articles were finally included in the study through the consensus of three authors. A five staged thematic analysis (data reduction, data display, data comparison, drawing of conclusions and verification) was used to analyse the data in this study. Results: 'Majority (85.7 %) of the articles included in this study are from Southern Africa, 11.9% from East Africa and 2.4% from West Africa. Curationis recorded the most publications (47.6%) of articles included in this study). Out of the one hundred and sixteen (116) authors that appeared on the articles included in this study, majority (90) came from Sub-Saharan Africa whereas 26 were from institutions outside Sub-Saharan Africa. Out of the 35 multi-authored articles, fourteen (14) were authored from the same institution whereas thirteen (13) articles were published by authors from two different institutions, two (2) articles each were published by authors from three and four different institutions whereas four (4) articles were published by authors from more than four institutions. The following best clinical nursing education themes were identified and described:'Having a well-developed clinical education programme in place; synergy between Nursing Education Institutions (NEI) and clinical facility; roles of institutions, clinical instructors and students in clinical teaching and learning and Continuous Professional Development of clinical instructors. From the findings of the study, best clinical nursing education practices in Sub-Saharan Africa were described in three phases: before, during and after clinical placement in addition to the effective communication, consultation and collaborative practices before, during and after clinical placement.'Conclusion: 'As very important as these practices are to clinical nursing education in SSA, the researchers hold the view that they may not be very responsive to the peculiar health needs of Sub-Saharan Africa as they are universal and not unique to Sub-Saharan Africa. This is asa result of the Eurocentric nature of Clinical nursing education research publications in Sub-Saharan Africa are Eurocentric and are not effectively meeting the peculiar health needs of Sub-Saharan Africa. We therefore recommend that nursing education institutions within Sub-Saharan Africa appraise and inculcate the findings from this study into their clinical nursing education programmes while evaluating the programmes and products on how responsive they are to the peculiar health needs of the sub-region. Further studies should be conducted on how nursing education curriculum could be designed to meet the peculiar health needs of Sub-Saharan Africa. The eastern and western parts of Sub-Saharan Africa need to conduct and publish more works on clinical nursing education within their sub-regions. As very important as these practices are to clinical nursing education in SSA, the researcher holds the view that they may not be very responsive to the peculiar health needs of Sub-Saharan Africa as they are universal and not unique to Sub-Saharan Africa. Clinical nursing education research publications in Sub-Saharan Africa are Eurocentric and are not effectively meeting the peculiar health needs of Sub-Saharan Africa. We therefore recommend that nursing education institutions within Sub-Saharan Africa appraise and inculcate the findings from this study into their clinical nursing education programmes while evaluating the programmes and products on how responsive they are to the peculiar health needs of the sub-region. Further studies should be conducted on how nursing education curriculum could be designed to meet the peculiar health needs of Sub-Saharan Africa. The eastern and western parts of Sub-Saharan Africa need to conduct and publish more works on clinical nursing education within their sub-regions.en
dc.subjectbest practicesen
dc.subjectclinical nursing educationen
dc.subjectSub-Saharan Africaen
dc.date.available2016-07-13T11:02:18Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-13T11:02:18Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.name27th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationCape Town, South Africaen
dc.descriptionTheme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policyen
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