Incorporating Military'and Veteran Culture in Nursing Curricula: Where is Nursing Education?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/616026
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Incorporating Military'and Veteran Culture in Nursing Curricula: Where is Nursing Education?
Other Titles:
What Does Curriculum Development Have to Do With Nursing?
Author(s):
Patterson, Barbara J.; Elliott, Brenda S.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Eta Beta
Author Details:
Barbara J. Patterson, RN, ANEF, bjpatterson@mail.widener.edu; Brenda S. Elliott, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, July 24, 2016: Purpose: The primary purpose of this study was to describe the curricular content that addresses the cultural and healthcare aspects of the military, Veteran, and their families.' While research related to military, Veterans, and their families is growing, there is little published on how pre-licensure nursing education should be approached, specifically if and how care of this unique population should be incorporated into nursing curricula.' Nurses are in a key position to care for military and Veteran service members and their families, especially after separation from the service.' Currently, there are Veterans living from 6 different wars:' World War II, Korea, Vietnam, Desert Strom, Iraq, and Afghanistan. 'Nurses and other healthcare providers are likely interacting with Veterans on a daily or weekly basis and in most cases, not even aware that they have.' Through increasing awareness about the experiences of active military, Veterans, and their families, it is hoped that cultural sensitivity and compassion for their experiences and healthcare needs can be better achieved. Methods: The study was an exploratory descriptive design framed by Purnell's Model for Cultural Competence.' The investigators developed a 28-item survey to capture the six initiatives set forth in the American Association of Colleges Nursing pledge.' The survey had both open- and closed-ended items that included school/college demographics; questions related to past, present, and future military/Veteran healthcare curricular elements; faculty knowledge, comfort, and preparation with teaching the content; whether their school/college had met the Joining Forcesinitiatives, and facilitators and barriers to meeting the initiatives.' A total of 583 email invitations were sent to potential respondents with 123 programs responding to the survey. Results: The findings suggest that some schools/colleges of nursing have exceeded the Joining Forces initiative goals, some who have implemented little, while most are in the process.' Respondents shared approaches used to enhance courses and curricula.' Faculty who were veterans were a strength to program enhancement.' The majority felt incorporating this content was important, although lack of time and a content-laden curriculum were common barriers.' Areas that programs felt they could enhance content were in special topics, community (public) health, and health assessment courses. Conclusion: Healthcare providers need a toolkit of general cultural knowledge so that they can ask specific cultural assessment questions.' Nurse educators have an ethical obligation to teach culturally sensitive care.' The first goal of educating future nurses to care for this population is an area where nurse faculty have the ability and responsibility to incorporate military and Veteran specific content into their curricula. Veteran-centered care is a global issue and the preparation of new nurses is the first step in providing culturally sensitive care to this population.
Keywords:
cultural sensitivity; veteran-centered; nursing curricula
Repository Posting Date:
13-Jul-2016
Date of Publication:
13-Jul-2016 ; 13-Jul-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC16L11; INRC16L11
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
27th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Cape Town, South Africa
Description:
Theme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleIncorporating Military'and Veteran Culture in Nursing Curricula: Where is Nursing Education?en
dc.title.alternativeWhat Does Curriculum Development Have to Do With Nursing?en
dc.contributor.authorPatterson, Barbara J.en
dc.contributor.authorElliott, Brenda S.en
dc.contributor.departmentEta Betaen
dc.author.detailsBarbara J. Patterson, RN, ANEF, bjpatterson@mail.widener.edu; Brenda S. Elliott, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/616026-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, July 24, 2016: Purpose: The primary purpose of this study was to describe the curricular content that addresses the cultural and healthcare aspects of the military, Veteran, and their families.' While research related to military, Veterans, and their families is growing, there is little published on how pre-licensure nursing education should be approached, specifically if and how care of this unique population should be incorporated into nursing curricula.' Nurses are in a key position to care for military and Veteran service members and their families, especially after separation from the service.' Currently, there are Veterans living from 6 different wars:' World War II, Korea, Vietnam, Desert Strom, Iraq, and Afghanistan. 'Nurses and other healthcare providers are likely interacting with Veterans on a daily or weekly basis and in most cases, not even aware that they have.' Through increasing awareness about the experiences of active military, Veterans, and their families, it is hoped that cultural sensitivity and compassion for their experiences and healthcare needs can be better achieved. Methods: The study was an exploratory descriptive design framed by Purnell's Model for Cultural Competence.' The investigators developed a 28-item survey to capture the six initiatives set forth in the American Association of Colleges Nursing pledge.' The survey had both open- and closed-ended items that included school/college demographics; questions related to past, present, and future military/Veteran healthcare curricular elements; faculty knowledge, comfort, and preparation with teaching the content; whether their school/college had met the Joining Forcesinitiatives, and facilitators and barriers to meeting the initiatives.' A total of 583 email invitations were sent to potential respondents with 123 programs responding to the survey. Results: The findings suggest that some schools/colleges of nursing have exceeded the Joining Forces initiative goals, some who have implemented little, while most are in the process.' Respondents shared approaches used to enhance courses and curricula.' Faculty who were veterans were a strength to program enhancement.' The majority felt incorporating this content was important, although lack of time and a content-laden curriculum were common barriers.' Areas that programs felt they could enhance content were in special topics, community (public) health, and health assessment courses. Conclusion: Healthcare providers need a toolkit of general cultural knowledge so that they can ask specific cultural assessment questions.' Nurse educators have an ethical obligation to teach culturally sensitive care.' The first goal of educating future nurses to care for this population is an area where nurse faculty have the ability and responsibility to incorporate military and Veteran specific content into their curricula. Veteran-centered care is a global issue and the preparation of new nurses is the first step in providing culturally sensitive care to this population.en
dc.subjectcultural sensitivityen
dc.subjectveteran-centereden
dc.subjectnursing curriculaen
dc.date.available2016-07-13T11:02:26Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-13T11:02:26Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.name27th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationCape Town, South Africaen
dc.descriptionTheme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policyen
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