Resilience, Coping Styles, Sleep Disturbances, Depression and Anxiety in Females With Breast Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/616037
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Poster
Title:
Resilience, Coping Styles, Sleep Disturbances, Depression and Anxiety in Females With Breast Cancer
Author(s):
Huang, Chiung-Yu; Hung, Chao-Ming; Lai, Hui-Ling; Chen, Chun-I; Tu, Shu-Yun; Yao, YuChun; Shih, Mei-Ling
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Lambda Beta-at-Large
Author Details:
Chiung-Yu Huang, RN, chyh@isu.edu.tw; Chao-Ming Hung; Hui-Ling Lai, RN; Chun-I Chen; Shu-Yun Tu, RN; YuChun Yao, RN; Mei-Ling Shih, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Thursday, July 21, 2016 and Friday, July 22, 2016: Purpose: Influences of resilience on the presence and severity of depression and anxiety following diagnosed breast cancer are largely unknown. Hence, we examined 1). the factors that may enhance and promote resilience in adults with breast cancer; 2) the mediating effects of resilience or three coping styles on depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbances in females with breast cancer were also examined. Methods: Face-to-face, structured interviews were employed to collect information of individuals with breast cancer. Study questionnaires included a demographic sheet, disease characteristics, the modified Resilience scale, the Hospital Depression and Anxiety scale, and the modified Coping scale. Using the structural equation modeling technique analyzed all relationships among factors, mediators, and health outcomes. Results: 'The average age of the participants was 52 years (' 8.9), the mean time since diagnosis of breast cancer was about 22 months, and most females were married. The majority of participants were satisfied their relationship with their couples. For the prevalence of negative health problems of the participants, about 70% with sleep disturbances, 55% had depressive symptoms, and 27.4% had anxiety symptoms. All three coping styles were negatively correlated with depressive symptoms, but only active coping significantly correlated with sleep disturbances. The best fitted structural equation modeling included individual demographics and disease characteristics, coping, and resilience as significant predictors of depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbances; moreover, with resilience acting as a mediator in these relationships. Patients? characteristics and coping both contributed indirect effects on depressive symptoms via resilience. Education, income, and satisfaction of relationship were influential components of an individual?s construct affecting resilience on depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbances.' Conclusion: Disease characteristics and coping both exerted direct and indirect effects on depression/anxiety/sleep disturbances via resilience. If people with breast cancer have used more active and minimizing coping style, it seems that they were more likely to report less depressive symptoms.
Keywords:
sleep disturbances; Resilience; coping
Repository Posting Date:
13-Jul-2016
Date of Publication:
13-Jul-2016 ; 13-Jul-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC16PST44; INRC16PST44
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
27th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Cape Town, South Africa
Description:
Theme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleResilience, Coping Styles, Sleep Disturbances, Depression and Anxiety in Females With Breast Canceren
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Chiung-Yuen
dc.contributor.authorHung, Chao-Mingen
dc.contributor.authorLai, Hui-Lingen
dc.contributor.authorChen, Chun-Ien
dc.contributor.authorTu, Shu-Yunen
dc.contributor.authorYao, YuChunen
dc.contributor.authorShih, Mei-Lingen
dc.contributor.departmentLambda Beta-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsChiung-Yu Huang, RN, chyh@isu.edu.tw; Chao-Ming Hung; Hui-Ling Lai, RN; Chun-I Chen; Shu-Yun Tu, RN; YuChun Yao, RN; Mei-Ling Shih, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/616037-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Thursday, July 21, 2016 and Friday, July 22, 2016: Purpose: Influences of resilience on the presence and severity of depression and anxiety following diagnosed breast cancer are largely unknown. Hence, we examined 1). the factors that may enhance and promote resilience in adults with breast cancer; 2) the mediating effects of resilience or three coping styles on depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbances in females with breast cancer were also examined. Methods: Face-to-face, structured interviews were employed to collect information of individuals with breast cancer. Study questionnaires included a demographic sheet, disease characteristics, the modified Resilience scale, the Hospital Depression and Anxiety scale, and the modified Coping scale. Using the structural equation modeling technique analyzed all relationships among factors, mediators, and health outcomes. Results: 'The average age of the participants was 52 years (' 8.9), the mean time since diagnosis of breast cancer was about 22 months, and most females were married. The majority of participants were satisfied their relationship with their couples. For the prevalence of negative health problems of the participants, about 70% with sleep disturbances, 55% had depressive symptoms, and 27.4% had anxiety symptoms. All three coping styles were negatively correlated with depressive symptoms, but only active coping significantly correlated with sleep disturbances. The best fitted structural equation modeling included individual demographics and disease characteristics, coping, and resilience as significant predictors of depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbances; moreover, with resilience acting as a mediator in these relationships. Patients? characteristics and coping both contributed indirect effects on depressive symptoms via resilience. Education, income, and satisfaction of relationship were influential components of an individual?s construct affecting resilience on depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbances.' Conclusion: Disease characteristics and coping both exerted direct and indirect effects on depression/anxiety/sleep disturbances via resilience. If people with breast cancer have used more active and minimizing coping style, it seems that they were more likely to report less depressive symptoms.en
dc.subjectsleep disturbancesen
dc.subjectResilienceen
dc.subjectcopingen
dc.date.available2016-07-13T11:02:45Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-13T11:02:45Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.name27th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationCape Town, South Africaen
dc.descriptionTheme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policyen
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.