Pediatric Nursing Practice Environment, Job Outcomes and Safety Climate: Structural Equation Modeling Approach

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/616048
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Poster
Title:
Pediatric Nursing Practice Environment, Job Outcomes and Safety Climate: Structural Equation Modeling Approach
Author(s):
Guirardello, Edineis de Brito; Alves, Daniela Fernanda dos Santos
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Rho Upsilon
Author Details:
Edineis de Brito Guirardello, RN, guirar@unicamp.br; Daniela Fernanda dos Santos Alves, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Thursday, July 21, 2016 and Friday, July 22, 2016: Purpose: The nursing practice environment is critical to the wellbeing of professionals and patient safety, as highlighted by national and international studies. However, there is a lack of evidence regarding this issue in pediatric units. The aim of this study was to assess correlations between the characteristics of nursing practice environment, emotional exhaustion, job satisfaction, intention to leave the job, and safety climate. Methods: A cross-sectional study in fifteen inpatient units and three intensive care units of two pediatric hospitals in Brazil. The study was conducted from December 2013 to February 2014. For data collection, we used the Nursing Work Index - Revised, the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire - Short Form 2006, and the Maslach Burnout Inventory. The analysis was performed using Spearman?s correlation coefficient and Structural Equation Modeling. Results: The sample consisted of two hundred and sixty-seven nursing professionals. The results showed that professionals with greater autonomy, good working relationships with the medical staff, control over the work environment, and organizational support have lower levels of emotional exhaustion, higher job satisfaction, less intention of leaving the job, and a positive safety climate. The structural equation modelling showed satisfactory levels of adjustment and indicated that the variables of the nurse work environment are predictors of job outcomes and safety climate. The values obtained in the Pearson?s coefficient determination indicated that emotional exhaustion was the variable that was best explained by the predictors, while the safety climate and job satisfaction were presented as the mean effect. Conclusion: Autonomy, control over the work environment and relationship between nursing and medical staff are factors associated with emotional exhaustion, job satisfaction, safety climate, and intention to leave the job. Organizational investments - such as initiatives for reduction or relief of burnout, professional involvement in decision-making related to patient care, professional recognition, support of the nursing manager, and a learning through failures approach - contribute positively to the development of a favorable work environment and have significant impact on job satisfaction and safety climate.
Keywords:
Nurse Practice Environment; Safety Climate; Job Outcomes
Repository Posting Date:
13-Jul-2016
Date of Publication:
13-Jul-2016 ; 13-Jul-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC16PST27; INRC16PST27
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
27th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Cape Town, South Africa
Description:
Theme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titlePediatric Nursing Practice Environment, Job Outcomes and Safety Climate: Structural Equation Modeling Approachen
dc.contributor.authorGuirardello, Edineis de Britoen
dc.contributor.authorAlves, Daniela Fernanda dos Santosen
dc.contributor.departmentRho Upsilonen
dc.author.detailsEdineis de Brito Guirardello, RN, guirar@unicamp.br; Daniela Fernanda dos Santos Alves, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/616048-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Thursday, July 21, 2016 and Friday, July 22, 2016: Purpose: The nursing practice environment is critical to the wellbeing of professionals and patient safety, as highlighted by national and international studies. However, there is a lack of evidence regarding this issue in pediatric units. The aim of this study was to assess correlations between the characteristics of nursing practice environment, emotional exhaustion, job satisfaction, intention to leave the job, and safety climate. Methods: A cross-sectional study in fifteen inpatient units and three intensive care units of two pediatric hospitals in Brazil. The study was conducted from December 2013 to February 2014. For data collection, we used the Nursing Work Index - Revised, the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire - Short Form 2006, and the Maslach Burnout Inventory. The analysis was performed using Spearman?s correlation coefficient and Structural Equation Modeling. Results: The sample consisted of two hundred and sixty-seven nursing professionals. The results showed that professionals with greater autonomy, good working relationships with the medical staff, control over the work environment, and organizational support have lower levels of emotional exhaustion, higher job satisfaction, less intention of leaving the job, and a positive safety climate. The structural equation modelling showed satisfactory levels of adjustment and indicated that the variables of the nurse work environment are predictors of job outcomes and safety climate. The values obtained in the Pearson?s coefficient determination indicated that emotional exhaustion was the variable that was best explained by the predictors, while the safety climate and job satisfaction were presented as the mean effect. Conclusion: Autonomy, control over the work environment and relationship between nursing and medical staff are factors associated with emotional exhaustion, job satisfaction, safety climate, and intention to leave the job. Organizational investments - such as initiatives for reduction or relief of burnout, professional involvement in decision-making related to patient care, professional recognition, support of the nursing manager, and a learning through failures approach - contribute positively to the development of a favorable work environment and have significant impact on job satisfaction and safety climate.en
dc.subjectNurse Practice Environmenten
dc.subjectSafety Climateen
dc.subjectJob Outcomesen
dc.date.available2016-07-13T11:03:04Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-13T11:03:04Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.name27th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationCape Town, South Africaen
dc.descriptionTheme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policyen
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.