2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/616053
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Motivations and Barriers for Saudi Nurses to Pursue a Doctoral Degree
Other Titles:
Trends in Graduate Nursing Education
Author(s):
Cavanagh, Stephen J.; Alshehry, Abdualrahman
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Lambda
Author Details:
Stephen J. Cavanagh, RN, FACHE, FInstLM, FAAN, dean@scavanagh.net; Abdualrahman Alshehry, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, July 25, 2016: Purpose: A shortage of Saudi PhD prepared nursing school faculty and a limited number of advanced degree programs in Saudi Arabia are preventing the education of sufficient nurses to meet growing healthcare demands and prepare nurses for faculty roles.' The purpose of this study was to identify motivation and barrier factors that may influence the decision of a nurse to seek further education at the doctorate level. Methods: A mixed method design was used for this study based upon the Chain-of-Response Model (Cross, 1981). A questionnaire was distributed to four groups of nurses using email and social media methods. Respondents included nurses who were working in either clinical practice and academia and who had either made the decision to study for a PhD or were currently undecided. A total of 161 responses were obtained from nurses either working or studying in Saudi Arabia or internationally. The analysis strategy included descriptive statistics, ANOVA, ANCOVA, and factor analysis methods. Qualitative data analysis involved creating codes and themes to create categories of responses that could be compared with the quantitative data. Results: There was a statistically significant difference between the decided and undecided groups of nurses, based upon institutional or family barriers. There was no statistically significant difference between the motivation scores of the four groups or gender. Further analysis indicated, however, that institutional barriers were more important to female nurses in making the decision to seek a PhD. The length of time in practice or experience did not statistically impact the decision to pursue a doctoral degree, nor was it associated with motivation or barrier scores. Analysis of the qualitative data identified important motivation and barriers factors including prior success in study or work, the need to advance nursing knowledge, personal and work aspirations, and a belief in the importance of improving professional nursing and care outcomes. Support from family members, work colleagues and fellow students were important in deciding to study for a PhD. Conclusion: This study identified motivation and barrier factors that were important to Saudi Arabian nursing students considering international study for a PhD. Findings from this study may inform students from other nations who are considering overseas education. Results from this study can be used to reform policy and practice aimed at increasing the number of PhD prepared nursing'faculty necessary to grow the Saudi nursing workforce and develop its nursing research infrastructure.
Keywords:
Motivation; Doctorate; International
Repository Posting Date:
13-Jul-2016
Date of Publication:
13-Jul-2016 ; 13-Jul-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC16O05; INRC16O05
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
27th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Cape Town, South Africa
Description:
Theme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleMotivations and Barriers for Saudi Nurses to Pursue a Doctoral Degreeen
dc.title.alternativeTrends in Graduate Nursing Educationen
dc.contributor.authorCavanagh, Stephen J.en
dc.contributor.authorAlshehry, Abdualrahmanen
dc.contributor.departmentLambdaen
dc.author.detailsStephen J. Cavanagh, RN, FACHE, FInstLM, FAAN, dean@scavanagh.net; Abdualrahman Alshehry, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/616053-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, July 25, 2016: Purpose: A shortage of Saudi PhD prepared nursing school faculty and a limited number of advanced degree programs in Saudi Arabia are preventing the education of sufficient nurses to meet growing healthcare demands and prepare nurses for faculty roles.' The purpose of this study was to identify motivation and barrier factors that may influence the decision of a nurse to seek further education at the doctorate level. Methods: A mixed method design was used for this study based upon the Chain-of-Response Model (Cross, 1981). A questionnaire was distributed to four groups of nurses using email and social media methods. Respondents included nurses who were working in either clinical practice and academia and who had either made the decision to study for a PhD or were currently undecided. A total of 161 responses were obtained from nurses either working or studying in Saudi Arabia or internationally. The analysis strategy included descriptive statistics, ANOVA, ANCOVA, and factor analysis methods. Qualitative data analysis involved creating codes and themes to create categories of responses that could be compared with the quantitative data. Results: There was a statistically significant difference between the decided and undecided groups of nurses, based upon institutional or family barriers. There was no statistically significant difference between the motivation scores of the four groups or gender. Further analysis indicated, however, that institutional barriers were more important to female nurses in making the decision to seek a PhD. The length of time in practice or experience did not statistically impact the decision to pursue a doctoral degree, nor was it associated with motivation or barrier scores. Analysis of the qualitative data identified important motivation and barriers factors including prior success in study or work, the need to advance nursing knowledge, personal and work aspirations, and a belief in the importance of improving professional nursing and care outcomes. Support from family members, work colleagues and fellow students were important in deciding to study for a PhD. Conclusion: This study identified motivation and barrier factors that were important to Saudi Arabian nursing students considering international study for a PhD. Findings from this study may inform students from other nations who are considering overseas education. Results from this study can be used to reform policy and practice aimed at increasing the number of PhD prepared nursing'faculty necessary to grow the Saudi nursing workforce and develop its nursing research infrastructure.en
dc.subjectMotivationen
dc.subjectDoctorateen
dc.subjectInternationalen
dc.date.available2016-07-13T11:03:12Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-13T11:03:12Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.name27th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationCape Town, South Africaen
dc.descriptionTheme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policyen
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