Nurse Preceptors' Perceptions of Benefits, Rewards, Support and Commitment to Their Preceptor Role

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/616059
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurse Preceptors' Perceptions of Benefits, Rewards, Support and Commitment to Their Preceptor Role
Other Titles:
Developing Nurses: From Student to Nurse Leader
Author(s):
Viljoen, Alida Hettie
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Alida Hettie Viljoen, RN, RM, RCC, Alida.Viljoen@netcare.co.za
Abstract:
Session presented on Friday, July 22, 2016: Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is to examine the relationships between preceptor?s perceptions of benefits, rewards, supports and commitment to the preceptor role. Methods: A non-experimental, descriptive, correlational and quantitative survey design and a non-probability purposive sampling method were applied and utilised in this study. The setting for the research is the Intensive Care Units (n=13) of four major academic hospitals in Gauteng Province. The sample comprised of 80 (n=80) Intensive Care registered nurses, employed throughout the Intensive Care Units (n=13). Data was collected by means of a self-administered checklist (Dibert & Goldenberg, 1995) and participants were asked to rate all the items independently on a 4-point Likert scale. 'Data analysis determined the incidence of preceptor?s perceptions of the benefits, rewards, support and commitment to the preceptor role. Preceptors perceive there are benefits for the preceptor in preceptorship. Results: Preceptors use the preceptorship relationship to assist a student/newly qualified nurse in the transition and adaption to the new role and environment in which they are placed. It is an educational relationship between a skilled and experienced individual and a preceptee in need of support in the environment of placement. 'It offers a period of support and socialisation into the new role being taken by the student upon achieving their qualification. Preceptorship is a time-limited teaching and learning strategy in the clinical environment where clinical staff act as role models. Primarily, preceptors engage in preceptorsship to share knowledge, obtain recognition and achieve job satisfaction. 'Preceptors are highly qualified and valued staff, who undertake this role in addition to their clinical responsibilities and the risk of burnout exists if asked to assume additional obligations without appropriate rewards and support. Consequently, needs and expectations necessitate understanding so that preceptors, preceptees and clinical facilities may benefit from such programmes. The study indicated that if preceptors perceive there to be support for them in the preceptor role, their commitment to the role of preceptorship increases. Years of experience, age and gender had no significant role in the preceptor commitment. Conclusion: Preceptors in the intensive care environment in Gauteng are committed to their role. It is the responsibility of the education, institutions and nursing practice to provide benefit, rewards and support to sustain this role.
Keywords:
preceptorship; Critical care; Quantitative
Repository Posting Date:
13-Jul-2016
Date of Publication:
13-Jul-2016 ; 13-Jul-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC16E09; INRC16E09
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
27th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Cape Town, South Africa
Description:
Theme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleNurse Preceptors' Perceptions of Benefits, Rewards, Support and Commitment to Their Preceptor Roleen
dc.title.alternativeDeveloping Nurses: From Student to Nurse Leaderen
dc.contributor.authorViljoen, Alida Hettieen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsAlida Hettie Viljoen, RN, RM, RCC, Alida.Viljoen@netcare.co.zaen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/616059-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Friday, July 22, 2016: Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is to examine the relationships between preceptor?s perceptions of benefits, rewards, supports and commitment to the preceptor role. Methods: A non-experimental, descriptive, correlational and quantitative survey design and a non-probability purposive sampling method were applied and utilised in this study. The setting for the research is the Intensive Care Units (n=13) of four major academic hospitals in Gauteng Province. The sample comprised of 80 (n=80) Intensive Care registered nurses, employed throughout the Intensive Care Units (n=13). Data was collected by means of a self-administered checklist (Dibert & Goldenberg, 1995) and participants were asked to rate all the items independently on a 4-point Likert scale. 'Data analysis determined the incidence of preceptor?s perceptions of the benefits, rewards, support and commitment to the preceptor role. Preceptors perceive there are benefits for the preceptor in preceptorship. Results: Preceptors use the preceptorship relationship to assist a student/newly qualified nurse in the transition and adaption to the new role and environment in which they are placed. It is an educational relationship between a skilled and experienced individual and a preceptee in need of support in the environment of placement. 'It offers a period of support and socialisation into the new role being taken by the student upon achieving their qualification. Preceptorship is a time-limited teaching and learning strategy in the clinical environment where clinical staff act as role models. Primarily, preceptors engage in preceptorsship to share knowledge, obtain recognition and achieve job satisfaction. 'Preceptors are highly qualified and valued staff, who undertake this role in addition to their clinical responsibilities and the risk of burnout exists if asked to assume additional obligations without appropriate rewards and support. Consequently, needs and expectations necessitate understanding so that preceptors, preceptees and clinical facilities may benefit from such programmes. The study indicated that if preceptors perceive there to be support for them in the preceptor role, their commitment to the role of preceptorship increases. Years of experience, age and gender had no significant role in the preceptor commitment. Conclusion: Preceptors in the intensive care environment in Gauteng are committed to their role. It is the responsibility of the education, institutions and nursing practice to provide benefit, rewards and support to sustain this role.en
dc.subjectpreceptorshipen
dc.subjectCritical careen
dc.subjectQuantitativeen
dc.date.available2016-07-13T11:03:22Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-13T11:03:22Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.name27th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationCape Town, South Africaen
dc.descriptionTheme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policyen
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