2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/616087
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Making the Process of Policy Making Transparent
Other Titles:
Symposium: Giving Nurses Voice in Shaping Evidence-Based Health Policy: Lessons Learned From the Front Lines
Author(s):
Brooks, Teresa A.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Teresa A. Brooks, adcnative@gmail.com
Abstract:
Session presented on Thursday, July 21, 2016: Healthcare policy development in the United States is a patchwork quilt of complex issues complicated by legislative, regulatory and judicial activities.' Over the last twenty-five years healthcare policy has been challenged to address the impact of mandatory spending for healthcare and social security on the federal and state budgets.' Changes in healthcare have reverberated from the national, regional, to the state and local levels.' Yet, those directly affected by these changes fail to understand and engage in influencing the new structures, processes and payment models. Mistaken assumptions about how the healthcare policy process works, including the major drivers in formulating, reviewing and adopting changes in healthcare laws and regulation, are ?missed opportunities? that leave nurses outside of the process. Over the last several decades nurses have'recognized the importance of advocacy and expanded their efforts and focused lobbying by professional organizations including the American Nurses Association, American'Association of Colleges of Nursing, American Organization of Nurse Executives and the National League of Nursing.'Working together these four major organizations have'been a'strong'and united voice ?as advocates for nursing and'patients.?''During the Clinton administration?s health reform effort, nurses'were involved in meaningful ways.' That experience helped nurses to realize that the visibility and access to policy makers was worthwhile, and it helped to lay the groundwork for the future.'''Leaders of nursing organizations were asked to prepare white papers on specific aspects of health care reform legislation and major nursing and other health related organizations were active at the national, regional and local levels, participating in focus groups to identify and describe what were key components needed to make the legislation work.' Nurses served on major task forces to address such issues as access, cost, quality and safety, in addition to the new and expanded role of nursing in increasing access to primary care. 'Major health care reform legislation did not pass during the Clinton administration but nursing?s substantial contribution to the debate has borne fruit over the years culminating in the enactment of the Patient Protection and Affordable Health Care Act under President Obama.''Nurses are positioned to assume their roles in addressing the challenges of twenty-first century healthcare.' Appreciating the complexity and understanding the need for their ongoing involvement have given nurses the voice to advocate for change, including state scope of practice laws, promoting and funding graduate education, and the need for genuine collaboration and partnership with physicians and other inter-professional colleagues to achieve care coordination.'
Keywords:
Advocacy; Influence; Resilience
Repository Posting Date:
13-Jul-2016
Date of Publication:
13-Jul-2016 ; 13-Jul-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC16A12; INRC16A12
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
27th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Cape Town, South Africa
Description:
Theme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleMaking the Process of Policy Making Transparenten
dc.title.alternativeSymposium: Giving Nurses Voice in Shaping Evidence-Based Health Policy: Lessons Learned From the Front Linesen
dc.contributor.authorBrooks, Teresa A.en
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsTeresa A. Brooks, adcnative@gmail.comen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/616087-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Thursday, July 21, 2016: Healthcare policy development in the United States is a patchwork quilt of complex issues complicated by legislative, regulatory and judicial activities.' Over the last twenty-five years healthcare policy has been challenged to address the impact of mandatory spending for healthcare and social security on the federal and state budgets.' Changes in healthcare have reverberated from the national, regional, to the state and local levels.' Yet, those directly affected by these changes fail to understand and engage in influencing the new structures, processes and payment models. Mistaken assumptions about how the healthcare policy process works, including the major drivers in formulating, reviewing and adopting changes in healthcare laws and regulation, are ?missed opportunities? that leave nurses outside of the process. Over the last several decades nurses have'recognized the importance of advocacy and expanded their efforts and focused lobbying by professional organizations including the American Nurses Association, American'Association of Colleges of Nursing, American Organization of Nurse Executives and the National League of Nursing.'Working together these four major organizations have'been a'strong'and united voice ?as advocates for nursing and'patients.?''During the Clinton administration?s health reform effort, nurses'were involved in meaningful ways.' That experience helped nurses to realize that the visibility and access to policy makers was worthwhile, and it helped to lay the groundwork for the future.'''Leaders of nursing organizations were asked to prepare white papers on specific aspects of health care reform legislation and major nursing and other health related organizations were active at the national, regional and local levels, participating in focus groups to identify and describe what were key components needed to make the legislation work.' Nurses served on major task forces to address such issues as access, cost, quality and safety, in addition to the new and expanded role of nursing in increasing access to primary care. 'Major health care reform legislation did not pass during the Clinton administration but nursing?s substantial contribution to the debate has borne fruit over the years culminating in the enactment of the Patient Protection and Affordable Health Care Act under President Obama.''Nurses are positioned to assume their roles in addressing the challenges of twenty-first century healthcare.' Appreciating the complexity and understanding the need for their ongoing involvement have given nurses the voice to advocate for change, including state scope of practice laws, promoting and funding graduate education, and the need for genuine collaboration and partnership with physicians and other inter-professional colleagues to achieve care coordination.'en
dc.subjectAdvocacyen
dc.subjectInfluenceen
dc.subjectResilienceen
dc.date.available2016-07-13T11:04:04Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-13T11:04:04Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.name27th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationCape Town, South Africaen
dc.descriptionTheme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policyen
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