Theory-Practice Gap: Perceptions of Nurse Faculty, Nursing Students and Clinicians in Ghana

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/616121
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Poster
Title:
Theory-Practice Gap: Perceptions of Nurse Faculty, Nursing Students and Clinicians in Ghana
Author(s):
Salifu, David Abdulai
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
David Abdulai Salifu, RGN, salifudavid@gmail.com
Abstract:
Poster presented on Thursday, July 21, 2016 and Friday, July 22, 2016: Purpose: Globally, the theory-practice gap in nursing has been the subject of much debate within the profession. Despite attempts by nurse faculty to respond to changes in nursing education, the dichotomy between classroom theoretical input and what is practiced or experienced on the wards continue to defy resolution. Although well documented globally, there is a paucity of published research work originating from sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Moreover, experiences may be varied due to the differences in pedagogical approaches and health care environments in the more technologically advanced western countries and the resource constrained SSA countries such as Ghana. Pertinent issues relating to the theory-practice gap include: defining characteristics of the theory-practice gap, whether it is a positive or negative phenomenon, factors that may contribute to the existence of a gap, and what attempts have been made or should be made to bridge it. This research work is exploring the theory-practice gap by investigating it from the perspectives of three diverse key groups: nurse faculty and nursing students, and clinicians of University for Development Studies and Teaching Hospital, Tamale respectively. Combining the perspectives of these diverse groups will allow for a more holistic picture of the theory-practice gap in Ghana to emerge. Methods: A descriptive phenomenological qualitative study design has been adopted. A purposive sampling technique has been used to select participants and data is currently being collected through separate focused group discussions with each group. Each focus group consists of 6 participants.' Results: Thematic content analysis is being done concurrently with data collection and is expected to be completed by early March 2016.' Conclusion: The theory-practice gap in nursing 'has existed for over four decades and it is projected to continue in some manner.' Two major factors in the theory-practice gap are the challenges of nurse faculty to engage fully in contemporary clinical practice and the patterns of student involvement in clinical learning experiences (Sullivan, 2010). Many initiatives have been introduced in an effort to bridge the theory-practice gap. Most of the initiatives have evolved in geographic areas such as the US, UK, and other developed nations. Little research addressing the issues is evident in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Given the unique context of nursing and healthcare in Ghana and other nations of SSA, identification of the nature and scope of the theory-practice gap needs to be undertaken. 'Without this requisite knowledge effective strategies to address the theory-practice gap may not be developed.
Keywords:
Theory-practice gap; Nursing education and practice; Perceptions of nurse faculty, clinicians and nursing students
Repository Posting Date:
13-Jul-2016
Date of Publication:
13-Jul-2016 ; 13-Jul-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC16PST76; INRC16PST76
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
27th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Cape Town, South Africa
Description:
Theme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policy
Note:
This item was accepted for inclusion in the 2016 International Nursing Research Congress, but was not presented at the event.; This item was accepted for inclusion in the 2016 International Nursing Research Congress, but was not presented at the event.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleTheory-Practice Gap: Perceptions of Nurse Faculty, Nursing Students and Clinicians in Ghanaen
dc.contributor.authorSalifu, David Abdulaien
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsDavid Abdulai Salifu, RGN, salifudavid@gmail.comen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/616121-
dc.description.abstractPoster presented on Thursday, July 21, 2016 and Friday, July 22, 2016: Purpose: Globally, the theory-practice gap in nursing has been the subject of much debate within the profession. Despite attempts by nurse faculty to respond to changes in nursing education, the dichotomy between classroom theoretical input and what is practiced or experienced on the wards continue to defy resolution. Although well documented globally, there is a paucity of published research work originating from sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Moreover, experiences may be varied due to the differences in pedagogical approaches and health care environments in the more technologically advanced western countries and the resource constrained SSA countries such as Ghana. Pertinent issues relating to the theory-practice gap include: defining characteristics of the theory-practice gap, whether it is a positive or negative phenomenon, factors that may contribute to the existence of a gap, and what attempts have been made or should be made to bridge it. This research work is exploring the theory-practice gap by investigating it from the perspectives of three diverse key groups: nurse faculty and nursing students, and clinicians of University for Development Studies and Teaching Hospital, Tamale respectively. Combining the perspectives of these diverse groups will allow for a more holistic picture of the theory-practice gap in Ghana to emerge. Methods: A descriptive phenomenological qualitative study design has been adopted. A purposive sampling technique has been used to select participants and data is currently being collected through separate focused group discussions with each group. Each focus group consists of 6 participants.' Results: Thematic content analysis is being done concurrently with data collection and is expected to be completed by early March 2016.' Conclusion: The theory-practice gap in nursing 'has existed for over four decades and it is projected to continue in some manner.' Two major factors in the theory-practice gap are the challenges of nurse faculty to engage fully in contemporary clinical practice and the patterns of student involvement in clinical learning experiences (Sullivan, 2010). Many initiatives have been introduced in an effort to bridge the theory-practice gap. Most of the initiatives have evolved in geographic areas such as the US, UK, and other developed nations. Little research addressing the issues is evident in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Given the unique context of nursing and healthcare in Ghana and other nations of SSA, identification of the nature and scope of the theory-practice gap needs to be undertaken. 'Without this requisite knowledge effective strategies to address the theory-practice gap may not be developed.en
dc.subjectTheory-practice gapen
dc.subjectNursing education and practiceen
dc.subjectPerceptions of nurse faculty, clinicians and nursing studentsen
dc.date.available2016-07-13T11:04:55Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-13T11:04:55Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.name27th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationCape Town, South Africaen
dc.descriptionTheme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policyen
dc.description.noteThis item was accepted for inclusion in the 2016 International Nursing Research Congress, but was not presented at the event.-
dc.description.noteThis item was accepted for inclusion in the 2016 International Nursing Research Congress, but was not presented at the event.en
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.